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Baking powder starts to react after being opened. And continues until it’s inactive.

A reliable substitute is cream of tartar and baking soda. Two parts cream of tartar to one part baking soda by volume. ( 2 tsp to 1 tsp )

If you do a search for baking powder substitute you’ll turn up several.

My opinion, for LTStorage the baking soda and cream of tartar one works best.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Baking powder starts to react after being opened. And continues until it’s inactive.

A reliable substitute is cream of tartar and baking soda. Two parts cream of tartar to one part baking soda by volume. ( 2 tsp to 1 tsp )

If you do a search for baking powder substitute you’ll turn up several.

My opinion, for LTStorage the baking soda and cream of tartar one works best.

Thank you so much for that tip.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
I found this!!!


Baking powder is widely used to leaven baked products. The industry standard for baking powder shelf-life is eighteen to twenty-four months, but little information is available on baking powder functionality when stored beyond this time. A longer shelf-life would prove beneficial in certain situations, such as personal food storage, disaster relief efforts, and space missions. The objective of this research was to determine the effect of long-term storage on baking powder functionality.

The objective of this research was to determine the effect of long-term storage on baking powder functionality.
Six samples of double-acting baking powder in original commercial packaging were obtained from donors and two fresh samples were purchased.
Samples ranged in age from 0.25-29 years and were stored in cool (15-25º C) and dry conditions.

Under optimal storage conditions, it appears that baking powder retains its functionality as a leavening agent for many years and can be included in applications requiring long-term food storage.




Once the container is opened the baking powder shelf life is reduced to about 18 months. Moisture in the air will cause the baking powder to react slowly, releasing some of its leavening ability over a period of time.



Baking powder is easy to test for functionality. It is activated by a combination of heat and moisture. Test your baking powder by mixing 1 teaspoon of baking powder with 1/3 cup hot water. Fresh baking powder should produce lots of carbon dioxide bubbles. Cold water will not work for this test, use warm or hot water. The more bubbles the fresher the baking powder.

 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I found baking powder sold in individual packets at WalMart, and thinking that it's best to stock up on it long-term in the coolest part of the house.
Individual packets means using only what I'll need without opening the rest.
 

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Baking powder starts to react after being opened. And continues until it’s inactive.

A reliable substitute is cream of tartar and baking soda. Two parts cream of tartar to one part baking soda by volume. ( 2 tsp to 1 tsp )

If you do a search for baking powder substitute you’ll turn up several.

My opinion, for LTStorage the baking soda and cream of tartar one works best.
Thanks a lot. I got a recipe for ceam of tartar biscuits not long back and couldnt figure out what it added to the equation. Must be acidic enough to triggr the soda. I cant find any at Walmart except maybe in a tiny jar that costs four bucks. How about some vinegar in canned milk to trigger the soda? That might work too by cracky.
 
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