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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
An opportunity of a lifetime has come up. Your great uncle Chester has died and left you his Prevost motor home. The lazy lawyer calls you and tells you the keys are in it, along with a notarized transfer of title in your name. You can pick it up anytime, it’s in trust at a local storage yard. Just show your ID to the guard to gain access, before he hangs up.

You work out time off, and transportation to the next state to pick it up. En route along the five hundred mile trip you dream of cruising the highways in luxury, the envy of all other R-V’ers. While at the same time you can barely remember what uncle Chester looked like. But you decide he’s your favorite uncle anyway.

You arrive without a hitch and you are given access to the stunning million dollar luxury motor coach. That starts easily, and runs like a dream. As you pull onto the highway, it’s like riding on a cloud barreling along at seventy miles an hour.

Half an hour into the five hundred mile return trip home. The engine mysteriously dies, as does every other car and truck on the freeway.

Are you truly prepared?
 

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Sounds like the character in your story is truly prepared... to die.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
All right I see where at first blush this looks like a do the best one can with the available resources and a bit of luck type of scenario. It is and it is even more than that too. Lets say you get home in a week, the real question are you truly prepared to be away from your home for a week when the SHTF. Have you given any thought about that? Because you can do something about that now.

CT.
 

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If SHTF occurs I would not be home in a week. I'd be on my way to my BOL and I know the best ways by foot, bike, vehicle and if I had to by Cessna ok. I would not travel 500 miles from home to pick up anything unless I was prepared for most anything.
 

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Let's see. You are now stuck 465 miles from home. Hopefully you are in decent shape and have brought your "GHP" (Get Home Pack). Assuming you can walk 3 MPH, it will take you 155 hours to get home. If you can walk around 20 miles per day, that is almost 8 days of walking. On day one and two, most people will be too stunned to have much of an impact on your travels. I guarantee that by days 6-8 you better be checking your six and moving covertly or you will never make it back.
 

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Moving cross country in the daytime, military planners assume 2.4 KPH or about 1.5 MPH. Night movement is 1.6 KPH or 1 MPH.

This assumes you are supplied with sufficient water and food. If you are foraging and have to find water, you would be lucky to cover 8 miles a day if you move in the daylight hours or 5 miles moving at night.

This works out to 58 days if you're moving in the daytime or 93 days if you move at night.

Like I said, yer gonna die. :)

If you stick to roads, you could move 2.5 MPH day or 2 MPH night, but that would probably be unwise.

By the way Go2, if you could walk 20 miles a day, it would take just over 23 days, not 8. (23 X 20 = 460)

Source: INFANTRY TACSOP
 

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Moving cross country in the daytime, military planners assume 2.4 KPH or about 1.5 MPH. Night movement is 1.6 KPH or 1 MPH.

This assumes you are supplied with sufficient water and food. If you are foraging and have to find water, you would be lucky to cover 8 miles a day if you move in the daylight hours or 5 miles moving at night.

This works out to 58 days if you're moving in the daytime or 93 days if you move at night.

Like I said, yer gonna die. :)

If you stick to roads, you could move 2.5 MPH day or 2 MPH night, but that would probably be unwise.

By the way Go2, if you could walk 20 miles a day, it would take just over 23 days, not 8. (23 X 20 = 460)

Source: INFANTRY TACSOP
Debbie Downer... :grin: I was trying to enjoy the thought of Uncle Chester's RV, smell of leather, a working bathroom...Thanks Doodle. :roll:
 

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Moving cross country in the daytime, military planners assume 2.4 KPH or about 1.5 MPH. Night movement is 1.6 KPH or 1 MPH.

This assumes you are supplied with sufficient water and food. If you are foraging and have to find water, you would be lucky to cover 8 miles a day if you move in the daylight hours or 5 miles moving at night.

This works out to 58 days if you're moving in the daytime or 93 days if you move at night.

Like I said, yer gonna die. :)

If you stick to roads, you could move 2.5 MPH day or 2 MPH night, but that would probably be unwise.

By the way Go2, if you could walk 20 miles a day, it would take just over 23 days, not 8. (23 X 20 = 460)

Source: INFANTRY TACSOP
A pretty good estimate because it agrees with my own. I figure it would take about a month it I had to walk the whole thing. Covering that much distance I figure I could scrounge a working bicycle or motorcycle in the confusion and speed up the process.
 

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I would bring my get home bag. Good pair of hiking boots and several pairs of socks. I don't have enough food for a 500 mile hike though. Not sure I could carry that much. On the other hand I do have 30-40 pounds to lose. Looks like that would come in handy...
 

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I dont think that there is anyone that is prepared for a SHTF scenario. We all stock up on our stuff, get our BOL set and all the other stuff that we do but if it does actually happen, I dont think we are mentally prepared for it no matter how hard we try. If the SHTF I am sure I would survive along with my family and friends but I would always be thinking... I really cant believe it happened! We are so used to our way of life where we go to the store to get milk and bread, to go to the gas station to get fuel to use in our cars and lawnmowers..... It will be an experience if and when it does happen and I think most people that prep will be able to survive as long as they get away from civilization where they can grow their own food and live off the land.... but thats just my .02 and I have been wrong before...


Doc
 

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The hardest parts will be recognizing that it has happened and then accepting that it is ok that you survived.
 
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An opportunity of a lifetime has come up. Your great uncle Chester has died and left you his Prevost motor home. The lazy lawyer calls you and tells you the keys are in it, along with a notarized transfer of title in your name. You can pick it up anytime, it's in trust at a local storage yard. Just show your ID to the guard to gain access, before he hangs up.

You work out time off, and transportation to the next state to pick it up. En route along the five hundred mile trip you dream of cruising the highways in luxury, the envy of all other R-V'ers. While at the same time you can barely remember what uncle Chester looked like. But you decide he's your favorite uncle anyway.

You arrive without a hitch and you are given access to the stunning million dollar luxury motor coach. That starts easily, and runs like a dream. As you pull onto the highway, it's like riding on a cloud barreling along at seventy miles an hour.

Half an hour into the five hundred mile return trip home. The engine mysteriously dies, as does every other car and truck on the freeway.

Are you truly prepared?
I would hire someone to go get it for me. ::clapping::
 

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I would have put it up for sale at auction through the lawyer. I have no need of, or use for, a luxury motor home.
I would use the money for the next project on the list.
 
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I'll take the different path

How many of us have assets tied up in "crap" like the uncles RV instead of being truly prepared?

Don't wait for the silver bullet of a inheritance to have a chance, start now and work at it
 
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An opportunity of a lifetime has come up. Your great uncle Chester has died and left you his Prevost motor home. The lazy lawyer calls you and tells you the keys are in it, along with a notarized transfer of title in your name. You can pick it up anytime, it's in trust at a local storage yard. Just show your ID to the guard to gain access, before he hangs up.

You work out time off, and transportation to the next state to pick it up. En route along the five hundred mile trip you dream of cruising the highways in luxury, the envy of all other R-V'ers. While at the same time you can barely remember what uncle Chester looked like. But you decide he's your favorite uncle anyway.

You arrive without a hitch and you are given access to the stunning million dollar luxury motor coach. That starts easily, and runs like a dream. As you pull onto the highway, it's like riding on a cloud barreling along at seventy miles an hour.

Half an hour into the five hundred mile return trip home. The engine mysteriously dies, as does every other car and truck on the freeway.

Are you truly prepared?
As prepared as always, I wouldn't even think of going to town without a pistol in the truck, so, yeah, I would grab my pistola and head "back towards that lazy lawyers town". then regroup, situate, gearup and head home.
 

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I agree, we cannot be completely prepared for everything, but mental preparedness is a good investment. I started getting my basic BOB/ kits, tactical, and food storage from survivorsworld.com. Started with a 1 month crate (broken into smaller BOBs) for a family of 5, some knives and axes (Bushmaster hunting axe and knife), and freeze dried food, with MREs. Still building.
 

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I would have driven my bov to pick up the rv it still has points and a carb,and towed the rv home after it died of emp.plenty of fuel and cool stuff to cram in the motor home on the way home.
 

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I would have driven my bov to pick up the rv it still has points and a carb,and towed the rv home after it died of emp.plenty of fuel and cool stuff to cram in the motor home on the way home.
No way you would tow that monster with a pickup. You wouldn't get more than a mile, if that. We're talking waay too much weight. Even the newest pickups don't have tow ratings much over 16-18K #. That motor home would weigh at least double that.

Plus if your truck has points, it runs on gas. The motorhome is diesel.
 

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No, not even close to being ready. Not enough food, no power to run the well pump, No long term sustainability... yet. Plenty of Ammo though.
 
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