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I only read a short bit of the topic, and feel it doesn't apply to me, as my mind is fine with my doing what I must to survive

I for one don't plan on a up close /personal fight nor do I plan to use a knife for protection but would if necessary. With that said I have given more than enough thought to staying alive and since I've never been in that position to actually defend myself I still believe that if I did have to take anothers life in self defense I do NOT think it would bother me near as much as most say it would. What that says about me personally I don't know nor care. Those hear that don't believe what I say are entitled to their opinion, and I WILL live mine.
 

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ARCS you've brought up a point that I tend to mentally avoid. I believe I'm tough enough to do what has to be done. Afterwards? I don't know. I was raised Catholic, after all, and we all have that bag of guilt that we carry whether we deserve to or not. I think I would be good, but would fight feelings of guilt, and depression. Depending on the situation. If I'm fighting for my life, I believe I could deal. If it was a situation that someone was trying to take something from me, that my family needs, but the other person also obviously needs; I don't know how I'd feel after. It's good not to hide from this issue, but look it head on and think, really think about how to handle things.

I also don't want to get in a situation that I had to get up-close and personal. But I did buy a Big Ass Knife, just in case. That's what this site is for. Prepparing: mentally, physically, stores, equipment. It's all important. I don't know one thing that will be more important then another.

Thanks for the link. Good food for thought.
 

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'Know what's funny? My son talked to me just last week about me being "Intimidating" to other people. What a laugh. Apparently, I made his 60 year old coworker nervous, when I went to talk to my son at work. I was in pigtails, no shoes and smiled at the guy. Maybe it was my farociouse pigtails. Go figure.
 

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The article is well thought out on the psychological effects of violence. No matter what one may think, the reality of performing massively violent acts upon another is a lesson that comes AFTER the test is given.

As for defensive training, yes it's important, but I have issues with most martial arts training. Our daughter trained and fought tournamentsstatewide for years. When she was younger I decided I might as well be in the class if I was going to be sitting there watching the class any way. Martial arts is fun, healthy from a work out point of view, improves flexibility, and worth the effort. Spending time practicing Kata;s is a very relaxing thing to do, and it is even artistic to watch.

Most schools, dojo's, whatever's, do not venture into the "Destroy" techniques until you reach a really senior belt level, ans then as the article suggests, most intructors are reluctant to show the really devastating moves due to liability issues. Having been thru more than one type of hand to hand combat training classes and sessions in the military it was sometimes a mental struggle during sparring or tournament rounds, lol.

In my opinion, if you are looking for training that gets right to the point and isn't all that worried about the pagentry of the "Art", find a Krav Maga instructor. It's the hand to hand fighting technique of the Israeli Defense Forces. It doesn't mess around, and gets right to the point of ending a conflict, or creating an opportunity to escape, in the quickest way possible. It does not worry about how elegantly you perform the strike, block, or kick, it is concerned with how effectively you can do so.

Just one man's opinion.
 

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'Know what's funny? My son talked to me just last week about me being "Intimidating" to other people. What a laugh. Apparently, I made his 60 year old coworker nervous, when I went to talk to my son at work. I was in pigtails, no shoes and smiled at the guy. Maybe it was my farociouse pigtails. Go figure.
Just not gonna go there, lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I feel it is important to truly be as prepared as possible as opposed to just saying "well I'm pretty sure I can do whatever I have to, to protect myself or my family" then brushing it off and moving on to more comfortable subject. You have to ask yourself if you can truly take away every minute, every second, in the future forever from a person if you must. Post incident you will have your own feelings to deal with, but you will also have the authorities to deal with. ALL 911 calls are recorded...do you know what to say, and sometimes more importantly what NOT to say? In the minutes after an attack there are tons of emotions flowing, and in all the excitement you could say something during that 911 call that could severely damage your ability to claim self defense. Things like " I was scared for my life, or the life of my child.....please send the cops....send an ambulance he is hurt bad....I'm hanging up to try to help him, give CPR, etc..... Then GET OFF THE PHONE! You have shown a need for your actions but you have also shown that you are a human with good intentions that even though you were attacked you re now calling for help and aid for the person that you had to fight off. . Then NO OTHER STATEMENTS (ZERO) until you have had the chance to consult with an attorney. Again this will not fit all situations, but it is something that should be considered now rather than trying to sort through it all on the spot in the heat of the moment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I agree! I teach traditional karate for myself and a very few number os select students who do it for the love of the art. I know very few other traditional arts instructors who actually can teach and use their as a combat art for self preservation against the average determined attacker on the street. I teach my karate as a combat art, as it was taught to me, and I avoid competition like the plague because of the bad habits that tournaments breed. Competition is very counter productive to a true combat art because it teaches you to "pull" your techniques rather than hitting with intent to injure, all the "good" real world targets are prohibited, etc. I have studied and taught several versions of combatives as a civilian, in the military, as a law enforcement officer, and in Israel with the IDF as a contractor. The "self defense" I teach for the street is a blend of WWII military combatives/Defendo and the Krav Maga which I earned an instructorship in while in Israel. I focus heavily on using your natural reflexes (startle/flinch response) as a "bridge" into your combatives techniques because no matter how much you train you'll never eliminate that startle/flinch that happens to you when you are surprised and stressed. So why not use it, right?
The article is well thought out on the psychological effects of violence. No matter what one may think, the reality of performing massively violent acts upon another is a lesson that comes AFTER the test is given.

As for defensive training, yes it's important, but I have issues with most martial arts training. Our daughter trained and fought tournamentsstatewide for years. When she was younger I decided I might as well be in the class if I was going to be sitting there watching the class any way. Martial arts is fun, healthy from a work out point of view, improves flexibility, and worth the effort. Spending time practicing Kata;s is a very relaxing thing to do, and it is even artistic to watch.

Most schools, dojo's, whatever's, do not venture into the "Destroy" techniques until you reach a really senior belt level, ans then as the article suggests, most intructors are reluctant to show the really devastating moves due to liability issues. Having been thru more than one type of hand to hand combat training classes and sessions in the military it was sometimes a mental struggle during sparring or tournament rounds, lol.

In my opinion, if you are looking for training that gets right to the point and isn't all that worried about the pagentry of the "Art", find a Krav Maga instructor. It's the hand to hand fighting technique of the Israeli Defense Forces. It doesn't mess around, and gets right to the point of ending a conflict, or creating an opportunity to escape, in the quickest way possible. It does not worry about how elegantly you perform the strike, block, or kick, it is concerned with how effectively you can do so.

Just one man's opinion.
 

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I agree! I teach traditional karate for myself and a very few number os select students who do it for the love of the art. I know very few other traditional arts instructors who actually can teach and use their as a combat art for self preservation against the average determined attacker on the street. I teach my karate as a combat art, as it was taught to me, and I avoid competition like the plague because of the bad habits that tournaments breed. Competition is very counter productive to a true combat art because it teaches you to "pull" your techniques rather than hitting with intent to injure, all the "good" real world targets are prohibited, etc. I have studied and taught several versions of combatives as a civilian, in the military, as a law enforcement officer, and in Israel with the IDF as a contractor. The "self defense" I teach for the street is a blend of WWII military combatives/Defendo and the Krav Maga which I earned an instructorship in while in Israel. I focus heavily on using your natural reflexes (startle/flinch response) as a "bridge" into your combatives techniques because no matter how much you train you'll never eliminate that startle/flinch that happens to you when you are surprised and stressed. So why not use it, right?
Excellent! If only you were a tad bit closer, lol. I do have a Krav Maga studio in the area, but I haven't checked it out yet due to recovering from recently aquiring some new hardware to keep me upright and mobile, lol. Due to the area it's in I worry it's more about catching a trend more than true training, but it's unfair to jump to conclusions. Can't blame the folks who run the place for establishing a studio in an affluent area.

I would like to point out that taking a martial arts class is a good thing, but do fall into a mind set that a tradional martial arts class is the be all end all in self defense against a determined attack. In fact, it just might get you dead.
 
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I found this book really useful:

Self Defense Guide | Target Focus Training - Target Focus Training

They used to give it away as a free e-book. But I did not see the link for the free version anymore. It is very similar to the piece your friend wrote in that it is primarily a discussion on the nature of violence vs a barroom fistfight. When I read it, I took a lot of breaks to digest what each chapter was saying. Thinking about it took me to some really dark places. But I think it was well worth the time.
 
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The one problem that I have is that he actually strikes first - that in a court could be a problem. Just because someone approaches you and seems menacing to you is not justification for a violent outburst. (legally)

Before you use force you must be sure that it is necessary and prudent. Yes, you should use adequate force to stay alive and as unhurt as you can but if you step over the boundary of prudent force you can find yourself in jail on a felony assault charge.

The laws are different from state to state so know what the law says in your state so you don't become the criminal.
 
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The one problem that I have is that he actually strikes first - that in a court could be a problem. Just because someone approaches you and seems menacing to you is not justification for a violent outburst. (legally)

Before you use force you must be sure that it is necessary and prudent. Yes, you should use adequate force to stay alive and as unhurt as you can but if you step over the boundary of prudent force you can find yourself in jail on a felony assault charge.

The laws are different from state to state so know what the law says in your state so you don't become the criminal.
I'm new to this forum and don't want to ruffle any feathers but I have to disagree with some of what I read here. Like waiting to strike first...here is how I few this. If someone pulls a knife or gun on me I will not hesitate to attack at my first opportunity, I'm not going to wait for a knife thrust or for him to fire. The mere fact that someone pulled a weapon on me is enough of a reason for me to feel threatened to the point that I need to defend myself no matter what his actual intentions are.

The same is true for the attacker that tells me he is going to kick my ass, kill me or whatever hes says and he appears about to take that next step...I'll attack first and hard. It's those little ques that violence is about to erupt that we need to be aware. If some one just running their gums and there is nothing to indicate (by his body language) that he about about to attack, he gets a pass.

But I guarantee you this, I will not start on defense unless I'm completely surprised. By doing so I'm allowing the attacker to dictate how the confrontation will go and that is just bad juju.

I know many will disagree with this but at the end of the day I want to go home to see my family.
 

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In the videos there were no weapons. He attacked when someone got "too close" to him. That is assault where I live. Granted, he didn't use a weapon but he was the one who decided to strike first without what I would call prudent judgement. If the guy reaches out to grab you or pulls a weapon then it is self defense. That is what I meant when I said you should wait to be sure and not make the first aggressive move.
 

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In the videos there were no weapons. He attacked when someone got "too close" to him. That is assault where I live. Granted, he didn't use a weapon but he was the one who decided to strike first without what I would call prudent judgement. If the guy reaches out to grab you or pulls a weapon then it is self defense. That is what I meant when I said you should wait to be sure and not make the first aggressive move.
The question here is what is an aggressive first move? I'm standing on the sidewalk and someone walks up to me asking for some money because he's broke, he has one hand out and I can not see the other because of the way he is standing. I have asked him a couple time not to come any closer to me as I take a step back. He continues to advance on me asking for money. Is he being aggressive? Do I feel threatened? Questions that need to be answered before it happens.

Most of the time it's a panhandler that means no harm...or is it a meth head looking for a way to pay for his next fix? I have my personal space based on my experiences of working in the inner city and dealing with all kinds of people, I will attempt to keep that distance between me and someone else.

But I will defend myself if some continues into that space. This doesn't me I just beat the shit out of some homeless guy if he gets to close, but I will push him away and if he continues to move forward after repeated warnings I will put him on the ground. This I can easily justify if I ever have to go to court. But I can not justify knocking him on his ass and then kicking his head in. I don't have the right to past judgement and deliver punishment but I do have the right to defend myself.
 

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I have a pat answer for panhandlers - "I never carry cash" - If they start with " I need to feed my kids.. etc. I tell them I would be happy to take then to the store and pay for some food - they always walk away at that point..... I don't believe for a moment that they want food.
 

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In answer to the question as it is presented; Yes. I am prepared to do whatever it takes to survive, should someone want to deprive me of it.
 

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I would like to think that during an unarmed confrontation I would immediately react to whatever the threat is. Although I got a black belt in Tae-Kwon-do when I was 16. I'm now 48 and don't stretch or practice. A good stepping side kick to the side of the knee, or perhaps a sweep would be more to my liking. My days of a wheel kick or a reverse crescent to the face are gone lol.
 

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I would like to think that during an unarmed confrontation I would immediately react to whatever the threat is. Although I got a black belt in Tae-Kwon-do when I was 16. I'm now 48 and don't stretch or practice. A good stepping side kick to the side of the knee, or perhaps a sweep would be more to my liking. My days of a wheel kick or a reverse crescent to the face are gone lol.
I'm starting Tang Soo Do training at sixty I'm thinking mat work is more likely to injure me than in my youth and I want training to enhance my abilities not degrade them.
 
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