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There are some conditions that are like on opposite magnetic poles of anemia, where they must avoid both non heme and heme iron. These are the individuals that produce too much red blood cells which in turn creates an abundance of iron in their blood.

I should note, that Carbon pans contain more iron then cast iron pans do, and thus leach more iron into the foods, especially newly seasoned Carbon pans.
 

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Just checked out the obit column from the News paper where I grew up. Almost no one under 80. Makes you wonder if all our stuff is bad for us what kept the m alive so long. Sure wasn't doctors My Old Man Saw Three primary doctors to the cemetery before he got there. Smoked drank right up to the end
 

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As kids we'd eat some of the Swanson TV dinners, had food cooked in the first Microwaves made by Litton, Black & White TV we'd set a few feet away, ate food cooked in Cast Iron, Copper and Aluminum pans, Veggies sprayed with DDT, used leaded gas, sat in the bed of pickups going down the Freeway, vehicles with no seatbelts, used Chemicals & Paint that is banned now etc; everything was deemed bad after awhile but somehow we survived.
 

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According to today's regulators and bureaucrats, those of us who were kids in the 40s, 50s and 60s probably should not have survived.

Our baby cribs were covered with bright colored lead-based paint.

There was nothing to stop us from sticking a fork in an electrical outlet.

We had no childproof lids on medicine bottles, doors or cabinets, and when we rode our bikes, we had no helmets. (Not to mention the risks we took hitchhiking.)

As children, we would ride in cars with no seat belts or air bags and metal dashboards.

Riding in the back of a pickup truck on a warm day was always a special treat.

We drank water from the garden hose and not from a bottle. Horrors!

We ate cupcakes, bread and butter, and drank soda pop with sugar in it, but we were never overweight because we were always outside playing.

We shared one soft drink with four friends, from one bottle, and no one actually died from this.

We would spend hours building go-carts out of scraps and then rode down the hill, only to find out we forgot the brakes.

After running into the bushes a few times, we learned to solve the problem.

We would leave home in the morning and play all day, as long as we were back when the street lights came on. No one was able to reach us all day. No cell phones. Unthinkable!

We did not have Playstations, Nintendo 64, X-Boxes, no video games at all, only 3 TV channels, no video or DVD movies, surround sound, personal cell phones, personal computers, or internet chat rooms.

We had friends! We went outside and found them.

We played dodge ball, and sometimes, the ball would really hurt. We fell out of trees, got cut, and broke bones and teeth, and there were no lawsuits from these accidents. They were accidents. No one was to blame but us. Remember accidents?

We had fights and punched each other and got black and blue and learned to get over it.

We made up games with sticks and tennis balls and ate worms and mud pies, and although we were told it would happen, we did not put out very many eyes, nor did the worms live inside us forever.

We rode bikes or walked to a friend's home and knocked on the door, or rang the bell or just walked in and talked to them.

Little League had tryouts and not everyone made the team. Those who didn't had to learn to deal with disappointment.

Some students weren't as smart as others, so they failed a grade and were held back to repeat the same grade. Horrors!

Tests were not adjusted for any reason.

Our actions were our own. Consequences were expected.

The idea of a parent bailing us out if we broke a law was unheard of. They actually sided with the law. Imagine that!

This generation has produced some of the best risk-takers and problem solvers and inventors, ever. The past 50 years have been an explosion of innovation and new ideas. We had freedom, failure, success, and responsibility, and we learned how to deal with it all.

And, if you're one of them, congratulations.

Kind of makes you want to run through the house with scissors, doesn't it?
 

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Some day, someone will claim watching Sesame Street as a kid causes cancer because a study shows people with cancer watched Sesame Street at a kid.
 

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Some day, someone will claim watching Sesame Street as a kid causes cancer because a study shows people with cancer watched Sesame Street at a kid.
I wouldn't let my dog watch Sesame Street. Take it from me, it's not what it used to be. Let a kid watch Sesame Street ,and they might well end up some gender fluid communist with purple hair. They're indoctrinating pretty darned early these days. Sad to say.
 

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I wouldn't let my dog watch Sesame Street. Take it from me, it's not what it used to be. Let a kid watch Sesame Street ,and they might well end up some gender fluid communist with purple hair. They're indoctrinating pretty darned early these days. Sad to say.
OUR Sesame Street causes cancer. TODAYS' Sesame Street causes leftism.
 

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So I take it the general consensus is, "no." ;) Thanks, guys.
Want to see how popular cast iron is today? Check out Griswold & Wagner Cast Iron on Ebay and I think you will get some sticker shock. The demand is off the charts. Nothing better than some fresh (not dried) Pinto Beans, Buttermilk Cornbread, or some Texas Chili cooked in an old Griswold cast iron "Tite-Top" Dutch Oven. Most of this cast iron cookware is over 100 years old. Nothing better for on or off the grid cooking.
 

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I love being GenX....

Anyway, one of the comments on this thread got me thinking.... what's the best way to treat/condition a new cast iron skillet?
If it is a new skillet, it's probably Lodge. Typically they leave the factory already seasoned. That said, I would give it a good scrubbing with some hot soapy water and set it aside to dry. Next rub it down with a "very" thin coat of oil. I use peanut oil. This where most people make their mistake. Too much oil. Very thin means just that. Put a little on with a paper towel. Let it sit for a few minutes and then wipe it off with the same paper towel. Put it in a cool oven and bring it up to about 250 degrees for an hour or so. Turn off the oven and let it cool to room temperature. Take it out, wipe it down and coat it again with a very thin coat of oil. Repeat this procedure several times. After that, only clean it with hot water. Never soap. Over time it will out perform any non-stick skillet.
 

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After that, only clean it with hot water. Never soap. Over time it will out perform any non-stick skillet.
When I got married I had to memorize the sacred laws for handling my wife's cast iron, it was like memorizing my 11 General Orders in boot camp.

I think the surface on a properly seasoned piece of cast iron is incredibly durable and doesn't need to be babied but... I credit my 34 years of happy marriage to obeying the law anyway.
 
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