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Discussion Starter #1
Curious if anyone has had success painted a synthetic gun stock. I have a couple rifles with the ugly gray synthetic stocks and I want to paint them. I'm thinking Desert Tan for one of them. I've heard people talk about using Krylon spray paints. At Home Depot today I looked at the Rustoleum camouflage paints that say they will also work on plastic. Wondering if anyone has painted a synthetic stock, what did you use and how did it hold up? Thanks.
 

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I painted my Mosin stock (synthetic).
I bought the paint (spray) from Lowes and it is plastic specific Valspar.
It worked great with one caveat; it took forever to cure.
I lightly sanded it with 500, and then degreased it.
sprayed 2 coats and waited for it to dry.
The can says fully cured in 2 days, but toucheable in 12 hours (or something like that).
A week later, the paint was still tacky and had a strong paint odor. I contacted valspar and they said that this MAY happen.
2 weeks later it finally dried out and was no longer tacky.
It stunk for about a month, but now its good.
Over a year later, it has some rub to it in the grip areas, but holding up well!
 

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I painted my brother's rifle stock, and his Kel-Tec .380. They were both the ugly grey they like making stocks/frames out of these days. I used the Krylon "camouflage" paint, mostly OD, but with a few streaks of tan and brown on the rifle, and OD on the pistol. After that a coat or two of lacquer and thus far, it's held up wonderfully.
 

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I've done a fair amount. Not as much as Karsten who did it as a business though. Krylon Fusion is good and a few other standard paints like Aervo and Rustuleum in my experience, but nothing has been as tough as Alumahyde II. All the stocks I've done look almost the same as the day they finished curing. It's very hard to scuff being basically colored epoxy unlike Krylon and the others that a quick rub on a table top can scuff them. This is OD green Alumahyde II done years back and put through lots of use. It takes longer to fully cure, but it's worth it in my opinion if you want a really tough stock finish.

ALUMA-HYDE® II | Brownells

 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for the info everyone. I'm going to try it first on one of my ugly grey Remington 597's before I do the good rifles.
 

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IMO, if you don't camo whole rifle why camo anything......
Because the object is to break-up the silhouette, not necessarily try to make the rifle invisible. If you are in a hide, sure you might want your entire stick camo'd, but in all likelihood you are going to have your bipod and barrel broken-up by natural camo from your specific surroundings, and you'll have your glass ghillied-up in one way or the other.
 

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You can indeed paint everything if you have the time and are willing to do it. My 1st Gen FNH USA SPR



I can find a pic of my Savage 110FB

Karsten
 

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Another option is hydrographics or "dipping." It's really fairly simple, and there's lots of patterns to choose from. It's a little more expensive than painting, but if you're after a pattern that would be difficult to paint, it's a great option. I dipped my old service rifle in desert MARPAT: (only picture I could find at the moment)



The kits can be ordered from "mydipkit.com." Be forewarned though; dipping stuff is addictive, and you'll be looking around the house for other stuff that would look better in camo...
 

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P.S. Most commercial camo guns you buy are 'dipped'.
 
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