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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Would anyone on here shoot someone elses reloads? I mean, not knowing the person, say Joe blow on this forum was offering some reloaded 9mm, at a fair price..
 

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No offence to Joe blow but i wouldn't touch his stuff because in a survival situation you want only the very best ammo which can only come from a proper manufacturer where they have rigorous quality checks all along the manufacturing line even if it is more expensive than Joe's stuff.
I mean, if you're faced with a nasty zomb or mutant, the last thing you want to hear when you pull the trigger is the click-click-click of misfire after misfire.
And apart from doubts about bullet and casing quality, how can we be sure that Joe has used top quality powder, or that he hasn't been storing his ammo in damp or humid conditions?

Here are 3 excerpts by explorer Henry Savage Landor about his 1911 trek in the Amazon jungle, the first shows how dampness can degrade ammo (he had a Mauser rifle), the second shows how we need to buy food from only trustworthy suppliers, and the third shows that skimping on money by buying cheap is not a good idea because when it hits the fan we can't eat money..:)

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
yes sir, i fully understand the need for survival equipement to be of quality, and tested, before a bad situation..
I meant just for plinking around, I have some 9mm shells, and just purchased my fiance a nice 9mm, but shes never qualified for her training with a semi- always been a .357 revolver. That particular pistol is not available, so instead of a ring, i got her a lifetime warrantied 9mm. She is nervous about the "requals" and i want to be able to have many days "on the range" with her, and the date is quickly approaching. Probably not worth it though, becouse at .50 a round, thats still cheaper than "peace of mind" knowing about the quality you referred to. I couldn't stand the thought of " a cheap reload" hurting my baby.
 

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Reloads today are not junk. I would want to get them from someone I knew.
You still need range time , use your reloads for that save the new stuff.
 
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I have shot off lots of reloads by people I did not know,
Brown Bear
Silver Bear
Tulla
Wolf
Hornady
Remington Peters
Winchester
Federal
Black Hills
CCI
All loaded and distributed by individuals working differing shifts on different days, of the above list there are Russian manufactured rounds, in which I guarantee you the workers were drunk on cheap Vodka.
 

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I would not do that - if something happens to your firearm (KABOOM!) and you're lucky enough to survive the injuries to your hand, etc., you very likely just voided your warranty just as you blew up your gun.

Just like I would only pack my own parachute, I would only rely on my own reloads.

But I do not reload - I have guns with lifetime warranties for a reason...and I only shoot factory ammo for that reason.
 

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If it is someone you dont know, buy one box to try out. If they work well, then buy more. It is different right now. Beggers cant be choosers. I mean we can't find anything around here in stores, so get what you can ,within reason.
 

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I would for target shooting but nothing else.
I've done quite a bit of reloading myself, not to be cheap but for improved accuracy. Different powders, bullets & loads produce different results so trial & error comes into play to dial in the perfect combination. But... once you get it, the results are amazing compared to factory ammo.
I have never had an issue with consistency. For each given "recipe" all of my reloads are identical. I can't say that for factory loads.
 

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I have bought some millwall reloads, its a company though not a private party. If I trusted the individual and had personal knowledge of them - yeah.
 

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Even the commercial reloaders have occassional problems with their ammo but to use a stranger's reloads? Not me! I have seen too many people who completely ignore the maximum loads in the manuals and keep putting powder in until you had to beat the cases out of the chamber with a hardwood dowel.

I reload all my ammo and I have had no trouble with any of it after the first year of reloading my own. There is a learning curve to anything new and reloading is no different. I have a system for my loading and I don't allow interuptions.
1. inspect the case
2. size and deprime (bell pistol cases)
3. trim and tumble to clean the cases
4. inspect the case
5. Prime the case
6. charge the case (put in the powder)
7. compare the level of the powder charges in all the cases to each other
8. seat the bullets
9. inspect the cartridge

What this list doesn't tell you is that the scale is checked for zero and then the powder charge is adjusted to my notes and compared to the latest manuals by throwing 10 charges and adjusting until it throws the correct charge of THAT powder for THAT bullet in THAT case. I typically use +/- .01 grain tollerance for the powder charges. The dies used to process the cartridges are all set to duplicate what the manuals list as tested specs. The cartridge overall length (COL) is held to +/- .01" of the manuals listed tested COL and +/-.0015 of each other.
all powders purchased are top quality but I select powders that work best in my cartridges and guns for me. I never use maximum loadings - I always work a load up from the minimum charge recommended until I get less than MOA accuracy. My rifles shoot groups that are from less than one bullet diameter from center to center up to about 3/4" at 100 yards consistantly. There is no "off the shelf" ammo that will do that. My 357 will group to less than one inch at 25 yards and about 1.6" at 50 yards.

I have owned only one gun that I could not get to shoot well and I got rid of it after two weeks.
When I carry concealed I carry my reloads - they are the most accurate ammo that I can get.
 

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I don't bother resizing my own brass. It fit my chamber before so it should still fit.
 

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Would anyone on here shoot someone elses reloads? I mean, not knowing the person, say Joe blow on this forum was offering some reloaded 9mm, at a fair price..
Absolutely not, if I don't know them I ain't shooting their reloads. Here's the thing, you have no idea what their reloading practices might or might not be. He can tell you all day long how careful he is but that doesn't mean he really is. You might get squib loads in the mix and you might end up with a double charge depending on what he's loading, some powders are easier to double charge and not notice. Best case scenario in a double charge is the gun takes a beating, worst case is the gun blows up and you end up in the hospital having little pieces of shrapnel surgically removed from your body or worse. The individual probably has the best of intentions and is probably very careful in his reloading practices but it's just not worth the chance to find out otherwise.

As a side note, I've been approached in the past about loading for other people and the subject makes me very uncomfortable. First of all there is the legal ramifications of selling reloads and how that would be interpreted by the BATFE, secondly there's the liability issue if there's an issue with my reloads in someone else's guns. Should something happen more than likely I would be sued into oblivion not to mention I wouldn't be able to live with myself if someone ended up being hurt or killed shooting my reloads.

-Infidel

Edited to add:
You would be far better served investing in your own equipment and stocking up on components when they become available again than to purchase someone else's reloads. I would find someone knowledgeable in the art of handloading locally (try your local gun club) and ask for some guidance. Buy a couple of reloading manuals and read through the steps, try Lyman and Speer manuals and then buy some equipment either used or new depending on your budget. Lee makes pretty good equipment for someone starting out on a budget. Buy a single stage press and load up a little at a time in your spare time, you'll be amazed at how fast the ammo piles up especially if you have all the components on hand.
 

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In the early 70's I owned a Rossi 5 shot .38 that would nearly fit in the palm of you hand. I don't remember exactly where I got the ammo but it was from an individual. One shot was so hot it took the cylinder slightly out of round. I have never used any I couldn't buy commercially since.
 

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The guy I learned from taught me well......You shot what you reload and you are Responsible for it so be careful and pay Flipping Attention. I am going to guess 2000 rounds a month each for ISPC Comps and never an issue. I loaded mine to make a 195 PF using 230 LRN and they were hot.

As careful as he was one day the worse happened...He was shooter and I was RO when he tapped off a double charge and the World seemed to have stopped for a moment.

I learned a lesson that day that I will never forget. I will also teach someone to reload and even use my equipment but my Reloads are mine and only good for my guns.

Now Re manufactured ammo done out of the plant is totally different than roll or own stuff one at a time.

I am still shooting my IPSC loads from years ago now and then to break in a new 1911 but I don't let others shoot them even to this day and I have never had an Issue.

In short, if you mess up and blow your gun up it is your fault. If I sell, give, own you My Reloads and your gun blows up I am at fault and responsible.

Learn to roll your own and do it well.

Just my opinion

Karsten
 

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I have several rounds of 44 mag ammo from a "MAJOR" manufacture that have not fired. Four out of the first 10 I tried didn't work. So much for quality control and I will never buy ammo from them again. I also have a couple boxes 270 win with the tips of the bullets bent over. Brand new boxes with NO damage to the outside of the box, with damaged bullets inside, same manufacture.

I won't shoot factory ammo anymore. Not worth the cost or risk. I prefer to reload so "I" can control the quality. Plus I can reload bullet/powder weight combos that I can't buy that are more accurate than factory crap. For a lot less money. I know for a fact my ammo is more reliable and is better quality than factory.
Can't vouch for Joe Blow though.
 

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Apart from ammo, are guns best bought brandnew or can we trust second hand ones? I mean, it could be a zillion years old and badly worn with metal fatigue setting in, and might have also been accidentally dropped down a mountain or run over by a truck or whatever
 

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Apart from ammo, are guns best bought brandnew or can we trust second hand ones? I mean, it could be a zillion years old and badly worn with metal fatigue setting in, and might have also been accidentally dropped down a mountain or run over by a truck or whatever
Jim,You should probably start a new thread with a new question but used guns can be checked out by a competent smith and you will know what you are buying. You can check some guns out yourself with a few tools and some knowledge but it is always best to get a professional involved. If the seller won't let you have the gun checked out before you buy then don't buy it.
 
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