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Standardized Amateur Radio Prepper Communications Plan

In the event of a nationwide catastrophic disaster, the nationwide network of Amateur Radio licensed preppers
will need a set of standardized meeting frequencies to share information and coordinate activities between various prepper groups. This Standardized Amateur Radio Communications Plan establishes a set of frequencies on the 80 meter, 40 meter, 20 meter, and 2 meter Amateur Radio bands for use during these types of catastrophic disasters.

Preppers are encouraged to monitor conventional Amateur Radio and non-Amateur Radio frequencies for sources of information, including: National Traffic System nets, state ARES/RACES HF nets, global Centers of Activity (CoA), local VHF/UHF repeaters, CB channel 19, and national simplex calling frequencies. However, these standardized frequencies and channels provide a place for preppers to meet and exchanges information relevant to those of a prepper mindset after a catastrophic disaster.

Routine nets will not be held on all of these frequencies, but preppers are encouraged to use them when coordinating with other preppers on a routine basis. Routine nets may be conducted by The American Preparedness Radio Net (TAPRN) on these or other frequencies as they see fit. However, TAPRN will promote the use of these standardized frequencies by all Amateur Radio licensed preppers during times of catastrophic disaster. The promotion of this Standardized Amateur Radio Communications Plan is encouraged by all means within the prepper community, including via Amateur Radio, Twitter, Facebook, and various blogs.

Standardized Frequencies and Modes

80 Meters - 3.818 MHz LSB (TAPRN Net: Sundays at 9 PM ET)
40 Meters - 7.242 MHz LSB
40 Meters Morse Code / Digital - 7.073 MHz USB
20 Meters - 14.242 MHz USB
20 Meters Morse Code / Digital - 14.073 MHz USB
2 Meters - 146.420 MHz FM
440 (70 cm) - 446.420 MHz FM
FRS/GMRS - Channel 4 (462.6375 MHz)
CB - Channel 4 (27.005 MHz)
MURS - Channel 4 (154.570 MHz)

The communication of critical information using the AM mode is encouraged on the standard 80, 40, and 20 meter voice frequencies at the top of each hour so that those who do not have SSB capable receivers may obtain pertinent information using the AM mode.

Nets and Network Etiquette

In times of nationwide catastrophic disaster, the ability of any one prepper to initiate and sustain themselves as a net control may be limited by the availability of power and other resource shortages. However, all licensed preppers are encouraged to maintain a listening watch on these frequencies as often as possible during a catastrophic disaster. Preppers may routinely announce themselves in the following manner:

This is [Your Callsign Phonetically] in [Your State], maintaining a listening watch on [Standard Frequency] for any preppers on frequency seeking information or looking to provide information. Please call [Your Callsign Phonetically].

Preppers exchanging information that may require follow up should agree upon a designated time to return to
the frequency and provide further information. If other stations are utilizing the frequency at the designated time
you return, maintain watch and proceed with your communications when those stations are finished. If your communications are urgent and the stations on frequency are not passing information of a critical nature, interrupt with the word "Break" and request use of the frequency.

For More Information

Catastrophe Network:
http://www.catastrophenetwork.org or @CatastropheNet on Twitter

The American Preparedness Radio Network:
The American Preparedness Radio Net or @TAPRN on Twitter

© 2012 Catastrophe Network, Please Distribute Freely
 

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That's some excellent information Prepadoodle. Thanks.

I have come to think that we have enough of a presence here on the board in my general area that we can cover 3 of the 4 corners of the Dallas/Ft Worth metroplex with "eyes and boots" on the perimeter and if we all were HAM'ed up could provide SitReps in a catastrophic scenario. Of course, I AM just guessing on general locations of other members.

As far as I can tell, no one is unfortunate enough to have their ass stuck in the middle of the box!
 

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Hey guys, quick question. I'm wanting to get some information on getting started with some radio equipment. As far as Amateur Radio goes, what kind of licensing/permits are required? I was just on FCC.gov and was looking at various sections on "who needs a license", etc. I have held a Restricted Radiotelephone Operator Permit since 2007 and was just reading when you need one and when you don't. I see that there are 3 different "levels" of Amateur Radio licenses; Technician, General, and Extra. I noticed that each gives you privileges on different frequency bands and ranges, and that there are tests involved for each. Though on FCC.gov, I cannot find any info on getting licensed.

I'm hoping you guys can lead me on the right path. Thanks a lot and I look forward to your responses.
 

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I hate to say it but I have no plan, but my next door neighbor (only 350 yards away has a HAM license and a bunch of antenna's, If I cannot charm him into helping me (which he should since I plow out his driveway several times a year) doesn't help me I can always barter for groceries!
 
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Hey guys, quick question. I'm wanting to get some information on getting started with some radio equipment. As far as Amateur Radio goes, what kind of licensing/permits are required? I was just on FCC.gov and was looking at various sections on "who needs a license", etc. I have held a Restricted Radiotelephone Operator Permit since 2007 and was just reading when you need one and when you don't. I see that there are 3 different "levels" of Amateur Radio licenses; Technician, General, and Extra. I noticed that each gives you privileges on different frequency bands and ranges, and that there are tests involved for each. Though on FCC.gov, I cannot find any info on getting licensed.

I'm hoping you guys can lead me on the right path. Thanks a lot and I look forward to your responses.
This is the site with all you need to know ARRL | Licensing, Education & Training | Getting on the Air There is also a study guide that runs about $25 or so.

You can buy the guide, go take practice tests, comprised of the actual test questions from real test question bank, take the test and get your license. This is how I'm doing it but I honestly think the best route is to find a local club that offers classes and testing. You will need them for the test anyway. Pretty much any club will also offer a mentor or two, called Elmers, which will help you along the way.
 

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This is the site with all you need to know ARRL | Licensing, Education & Training | Getting on the Air There is also a study guide that runs about $25 or so.

You can buy the guide, go take practice tests, comprised of the actual test questions from real test question bank, take the test and get your license. This is how I'm doing it but I honestly think the best route is to find a local club that offers classes and testing. You will need them for the test anyway. Pretty much any club will also offer a mentor or two, called Elmers, which will help you along the way.
Thanks a million for the reply. The ARRL website was what I was checking out earlier. I will look to see if there is a local club in my area. Thanks again!
 

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*Update* So, I found that I have an Amateur Radio Club just a few miles from my house. They offer classes and training, as well as testing for both Technician and General Licenses. I'll post another update as I get stuff rolling. Thanks again everyone
 

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*Update* So, I found that I have an Amateur Radio Club just a few miles from my house. They offer classes and training, as well as testing for both Technician and General Licenses. I'll post another update as I get stuff rolling. Thanks again everyone
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*Update* So, I found that I have an Amateur Radio Club just a few miles from my house. They offer classes and training, as well as testing for both Technician and General Licenses. I'll post another update as I get stuff rolling. Thanks again everyone
If you have any radio knowledge, you might not need a class to get thru technician. Go to Callsign Database by QRZ.COM under resources you'll find practice tests. They cover every question in the FCC test. they even mix the answers around so they are in different A, B, C, D locations.
 
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