Prepper Forum / Survivalist Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Portable vegetable garden? No I'm not drunk. Lol.

I'm currently renting a house in the city. Our lot is of typical size, maybe 1/5th or 1/4 of an acre.

I want to start growing some of my own food. But.....

---I dont trust the soil in my yard. I'd rather control my soil content.
---I do not want to dig up all the bad soil and replace it with good soil.
---I plan on moving withing a couple of years.
---I like the idea of being able to segregate a contaminated container.

So my plan is to have a modular container garden. I do not want to completely replace my current food supply (grocery store), I just want to supplement my supply.

I plan on using the blue tubs with white rope handles available at Lowes/HomeDepot. They are approx 20 gals.

For soil, I'm going to go with a mix I've seen in other places; 1 part compost, 2 parts rose soil.

Does anyone else grow vegetables like this?
What vegs will NOT work in 20 gals of soil?
What vegs will yield the most food?
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,829 Posts
Very nice! I did that last year and only did tomatoes and herbs. Here is what I learned: Where I didn't punch holes in the bottom of the containers, it would be over watered and at one point the tomates and herbs wouldn't grow anymore. Also, the ones that I did have holes in the bottoms, I overwatered those as well, leading to (I think its called blossum end rot) or rather a lack of calcium on the bottom of the tomatoes (looks like a blister, hence the term "blossum end rot"). Some people told me to put epson salts in there next time or crushed egg shells (calcium). Other ways is to put compost tea and even TUMs in your plants. I found out this also happened to some peppers my neighbor had as well.

Keep up the great work my friend!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
What a great link. Thank you.

I plan on making my first purchase of tubs (4) in the next couple of weeks and will update the thread then. I'm leaning toward 2 tubs of tomatos, 1 of broccoli, and 1 of carrots.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
We did a deck/tub garden for several years and only graduated to tilled soil three years ago. Now we have over 1000sqft and feel cramped. There’s always one more thing to add every year until you’re out of space again.

Pole beans work well out of tubs if you have some structure for them to climb on. Their footprint is relatively small, but they'll provide many square feet of producing vines and produce for quite a while. A simple wood or PVC trellis or deck railing is enough to support them. I like the Kentucky Wonder and Blue Lake varieties best… about 65 days from seed to harvest-ready.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Container gardening like that definitely can be very productive. I'm doing something similar, and I wish I had as much space to fill with containers as you do! Totally jealous. I focus mostly on super-efficient use of the space I have, so I have just a couple tips from that angle.

-Always have a pack of radish seeds. Radishes are small and come up super-quick, so you can actually plant them around the outside edges of your large containers while the plants in them are still smallish and sprouting. By the time your tomato plant actually needs the space at the edges, the radishes will be out of there - maybe even two batches of them. Some varieties mature in only about 3 weeks from sowing. I have a constant supply of radishes without actually devoting any particular container to them.
-Salad leaf mixes are another great little space filler, and also do perfectly well in shallow soil - so if you wanted them but didn't have any container space for them, you can actually grow them just fine in some shallow guttering along the top of a railing or attached to the side of a fence. I get a constant supply of fresh salad from an old cracked casserole dish! I've heard strawberries are very good for this too.
-One thing you might look at is getting one or two minarette fruit trees. A lot of them are small enough to keep in containers like that, but they still produce quite a lot of fruit. I've certainly heard of people taking their minarettes with them when they moved. Plenty of self-fertile ones available too, if that's a concern. I'm definitely planning on getting a couple when I have space to keep them outdoors, it would be great to have an efficient little orchard, stock up some big piles of dried apples and cherries!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
183 Posts
This is a great topic and great responses. I have learned from this year that my soils SUCKS!!! The only thing I can get to grow are cucumbers and melons. I have started a aquaponics system but that will take another 3 months to get going. So I will be switching to a container set up for outside next year. At least until I can get my compost pile broke down and ready to till in. So as always thanks everyone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
One of the best methods I have seen is of a market gardener that sells fresh produce during the season at his mechanic shop in Grapeland he uses the long black cattle feed troughs that have a metal frame to get them off the ground from fire ants. Each trough has around six feet of usable row space. Stick to bush type plants, determinate tomato varieties, and hybrids that are meant for containers and your yields will be good. Also remember to use some type of fertilize and that to much will burn plants in containers. Best fertilize for containers in miracle grow mixed in water and applied when the container is watered, or compost tea will do the same thing.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top