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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok.
I dropped two water oaks today after work and limbed them up.
Tomorrow I will drag the trunks and big limbs off for splitting. (Yes I know I am a month behind schedule but I figure it will be dry enough for fire wood by January)
The rest will either get piled up for compost later or burned as trash.
The whole point of this post is this, the tree was heavy with acorns.
I remember the old timers had a saying about big acorn crops mean a bad winter or something like that. Am I just off base or has anyone else heard something like that before?
BoF
 

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I've never heard of that, but my latitude is not that much south of yours, and I'd love to see a cold winter.
We haven't had one in a few years.
 
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It is called a Mast year. Scientists believe it does not indicate a colder winter. Old timers believe it is going to be a colder than normal winter. I will reserve my opinion until I hear about the wooly worms.
 

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Saw my first wooly worm a few nights ago...in DE.
I was surprised to see it.
 

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I'd be more worried about this long hot dry summer. Record number of days above 90 in our area. After basically no winter last year. I'd say we are do for a nasty winter for a change.

This is based on averages not a nut or furry caterpillar.
 

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I'd be more worried about this long hot dry summer. Record number of days above 90 in our area. After basically no winter last year. I'd say we are do for a nasty winter for a change.

This is based on averages not a nut or furry caterpillar.

Do you believe the Native Americans?

It was late fall and the Indians on a remote reservation in South Dakota asked their new chief if the coming winter was going to be cold or mild.

Since he was a chief in a modern society, he’d never learned the old tribal secrets. He couldn’t look at the sky to predict what the winter was going to be like.

"It's going to be a very cold winter."

So just to be on the safe side, he told his tribe that the winter was indeed going to be cold and that the members of the village should collect firewood to be prepared.

But after several days, he had an idea. He went to the reservation’s phone booth, called the National Weather Service and asked, “Will it be cold this winter?”

“Oh, yes,” the meteorologist at the Weather Service replied, “It looks like this winter is going to be quite cold.”

So the chief went back to his people and told them to collect even more firewood in order to be prepared.

A week later, he called the National Weather Service again. “Does it still look like it is going to be a very cold winter?”

“Yes,” the meteorologist again replied, “It’s going to be a very cold.”

The chief again went back to his people and ordered them to collect every scrap of firewood they could find.

Two weeks later, the chief called the National Weather Service again. “Are you sure it’s going to be very cold winter?”

“Absolutely,” the man replied. “It’s looking more and more like it is going to be one of the coldest winters we’ve ever seen.”

“How can you be so sure?” the chief asked.

“Simple,” the weatherman replied, “The Indians are collecting a sh!tload of firewood.”
 

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Ok.
I dropped two water oaks today after work and limbed them up.
Tomorrow I will drag the trunks and big limbs off for splitting. (Yes I know I am a month behind schedule but I figure it will be dry enough for fire wood by January)
The rest will either get piled up for compost later or burned as trash.
The whole point of this post is this, the tree was heavy with acorns.
I remember the old timers had a saying about big acorn crops mean a bad winter or something like that. Am I just off base or has anyone else heard something like that before?
BoF
If you have access to a whole lot of acorns, if processed correctly, they can be a good food source.
They have been used around the world as they keep well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I’ve heard of acorn flour before.
I never thought about harvesting them. I just usually set up a deer stand close by and try to catch one coming in for a meal.
 

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