Prepper Forum / Survivalist Forum banner
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,086 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This would be a place where folks could share their own ways to get around buying supplies and products they use in daily living and for prepping.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,112 Posts
I think it's a tremendous idea.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,068 Posts
The greatest screw-lube ever.

No, not that kind; get your mind out of the gutter.

I was finishing up building another shop cabinet today and had to install two 4 foot piano hinges to hang the doors. - Read that to mean there were a LOT of little #4 screws to put in. Normally I use a wax ring for seating a toilet as a good screw lube, but I did not have one on hand. Bar soap works in a pinch, but not real well and since these were going into some REALLY hard red elm, I did not want to take the chance twisting them off.

So, I took some bees wax, shaved it into small strips, then mixed in a small amount of mineral spirits until it was about the consistency of soft butter. It worked better than anything I have ever used. It had the added benefit of being REALLY easy to clean up the squeeze-out as well. Just a rag with some mineral spirits and the squeeze-out came right off.
 
  • Like
Reactions: hayden

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,068 Posts
Maybe some recipes for homemade liquid board straightener..
I have used steam, but it is a long SLOW process. Also, depending on why the board warped in the first place you may not able to do much about it. If the board warped because the sawyer misread the grain, you may as well use it for small part where the warping won't matter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,207 Posts
The greatest screw-lube ever.

No, not that kind; get your mind out of the gutter.

I was finishing up building another shop cabinet today and had to install two 4 foot piano hinges to hang the doors. - Read that to mean there were a LOT of little #4 screws to put in. Normally I use a wax ring for seating a toilet as a good screw lube, but I did not have one on hand. Bar soap works in a pinch, but not real well and since these were going into some REALLY hard red elm, I did not want to take the chance twisting them off.

So, I took some bees wax, shaved it into small strips, then mixed in a small amount of mineral spirits until it was about the consistency of soft butter. It worked better than anything I have ever used. It had the added benefit of being REALLY easy to clean up the squeeze-out as well. Just a rag with some mineral spirits and the squeeze-out came right off.
No disrespect but "screw lube?!)"

I thought that went out after the advent of a cordless drill, seriously I've driven thousands and thousands of screws and never thought I needed a better system, could be just me.

But seriously I wouldn't visit such a web site, each specific need for a Jerry rig would be too specific to learn anything from is you have any decent refashioning skills yourself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,068 Posts
No disrespect but "screw lube?!)

I thought that went out after the advent of a cordless drill, seriously I've driven thousands and thousands of screws and never thought I needed a better system, could be just me.
None taken.

When putting screws into dense hardwoods, maple is particularly bad, but elm and birch will do it too, if you try to use a cordless drill or even by hand, you will often twist the head of the screw right off. So yes, when I am doing cabinetry or furniture, I ALWAYS drill the correct sized pilot holes and put the screws in by hand the first time.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,678 Posts
The greatest screw-lube ever.

So, I took some bees wax, shaved it into small strips, then mixed in a small amount of mineral spirits until it was about the consistency of soft butter. It worked better than anything I have ever used. It had the added benefit of being REALLY easy to clean up the squeeze-out as well. Just a rag with some mineral spirits and the squeeze-out came right off.
I thought that was what pilot holes were for.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,678 Posts
This would be a place where folks could share their own ways to get around buying supplies and products they use in daily living and for prepping.
I kinda thought this went along with prepping. Being able to DYI will be essential since calling in a tradesman could be kinda tough in a SHTF scenario. This is the perfect spot for it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,068 Posts
I thought that was what pilot holes were for.
Pilot holes only work fine in oak and hickory, sometimes even cherry and walnut. But if you get into maple, birch, or some other dense hardwood, not so much. That is especially true if you are using brass screws or even small (#4 or #6) steel screws. I never worry about it with plywood (of course) or any course grained hardwood. But otherwise it is far easier to take an extra few seconds to apply some wax than it is to spend a half hour or better working a broken screw out of the hole.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
425 Posts
I have a rather complete workshop and can do many tasks at home, from ASE certified master tech for vehicles, diesels, metal machining and fabrication (multiple welding techniques & equipment), light gunsmithing, carpentry and light cabinetry/furniture, and of course cooking, canning, farming, horticulture, and I'm sure a few other things I'm forgetting like electronics, computers, and electrician.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,068 Posts
I consider myself a steel man, I can heat and bend, drill, grind, weld, braze, cut, thread or tap it. But I can't hardly hammer a nail in a 2x4 without it splitting down the middle.
That is the next frontier. I worked my way through college working in a machine shop, so I know the basics. But I have not done much with metal fabrication since. I simply do not have the room right now to set up a proper metal shop with all of my woodworking tools. But hopefully soon...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,595 Posts
Yay, start running off simple bulletproof vests for a fraction of the price of store-bought ones and you'll make a mint, something like this Russian WW2 doods..:)
I thought about that myself it is well known that many bullet resistant vest is made of AR500 steel plate. I don't know how much a sheet of 4'x8' x1/4" would be but cutting it with a plasma torch would be very easy, and putting a bend for better fit would also be easy with a hydraulic press. AR500 steel is used in a lot of mining trucks like the bottom of dump truck beds. Leaf springs may be another source to make bullet resistant armor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,086 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Modern long arms will penetrate 1/4" AR500 easily. At the range I go to we have 1/2" AR500 plates for practice and competition and even though no rifles are allowed they dish up pretty good after a month or so just using pistol ammo - 9mm, 40S&W, 38, 357, and 45ACP. Steel in the appropriate thickness would be way too heavy to wear as armor. To use as plates behind fabric armor they are helpful in spreading the impact shock over a wider area but that is about all.

The newest technology in body armor is ceramic and non-Newtonian fluids. They show greater success in stopping higher velocity rounds without needing backing plates to spread impact loads. On the downside you need very high tech machines to make them effectively.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,595 Posts
Modern long arms will penetrate 1/4" AR500 easily. At the range I go to we have 1/2" AR500 plates for practice and competition and even though no rifles are allowed they dish up pretty good after a month or so just using pistol ammo - 9mm, 40S&W, 38, 357, and 45ACP. Steel in the appropriate thickness would be way too heavy to wear as armor. To use as plates behind fabric armor they are helpful in spreading the impact shock over a wider area but that is about all.

The newest technology in body armor is ceramic and non-Newtonian fluids. They show greater success in stopping higher velocity rounds without needing backing plates to spread impact loads. On the downside you need very high tech machines to make them effectively.
I believe this is one of the best test of different body armor that I have seen.

Also one of the not so funny properties of ceramic armor is that it will stop a high powered rifle but if you drop it is can break.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top