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Currently reading this book by local Arizonan Cody Lundin. At first I didn't really like it but once I learned that it is less of an instruction manual and written more like a casual conversation that Cody is having with the reader, I got to like it a lot more. I'd recommend it.

But here is the question it has me asking...

What is your comfortable house temp (not exposed to the elements) with shorts and a T-Shirt?
I'm talking no heating, no air-conditioner, but in your own home and sheltered away from the elements?


For me I can comfortably do 80 degrees F on the high end and 60 degrees on the low end. I could probably push that by 10 degrees either way and sacrifice a little comfort.

Obviously your answer will be entirely dependent on where you have lived the last 10 years and what you have become accustomed to. For me it is 4 years in the Phoenix Desert and Foothills Transition Zone and then before that almost 20 years on the Third Coast in hot, humid Houston Texas. So the heat I get. The dry air of AZ is a blessing to me.

I know some people here that set their AC at 90 and never run a heater. I'd love to get to that kind of tolerance but the wife and daughter would never go for it.
 
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I can handle past 40c but don't like below 8c (104F to 46.4F)
 

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I'm happiest at 0C, Winter is optimal for me..

+40C is INSANE, I suffer at +30C.

I would gladly move to Russian Siberia but my husband is not interested.
 

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IMG_2679411378383.jpeg
Been itching to use this pic here, thank you :)

I'm happiest at 0C, Winter is optimal for me..

+40C is INSANE, I suffer at +30C.

I would gladly move to Russian Siberia but my husband is not interested.
 

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Our outside temps range from 0 to 100. With no AC and a kitchen wood stove, the kitchen is in the mid 80s in both summer and winter. Once you're adapted, it's not that bad. We *could* install an AC, but it's another thing to depend on.

I worry for elderly and children who are used to a more moderate climate control because they are the ones who will suffer most if the grid is down. It wouldn't be a bad idea to adapt now to save the stress after, but then again, we could all live out our lives with no grid down event and AC sure is nice. :)
 

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Our outside temps range from 0 to 100. With no AC and a kitchen wood stove, the kitchen is in the mid 80s in both summer and winter. Once you're adapted, it's not that bad. We *could* install an AC, but it's another thing to depend on.

I worry for elderly and children who are used to a more moderate climate control because they are the ones who will suffer most if the grid is down. It wouldn't be a bad idea to adapt now to save the stress after, but then again, we could all live out our lives with no grid down event and AC sure is nice. :)
I made that comment on another forum a while ago, I doubt your stalking me but... :D Lol its true tho, we didn't need air con in the 1800s and its a matter of time (but a opinion chat left for another time, its way past bed time :) )
 

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I love World history and have been immersed in it since I learned how to read. I remember reading about ancient Indian kings who had their staff suspend several thin ropes from the windows with small glass containers of water lining down each rope, the wind cools evaporating water, which cools the room by several degrees. Cleapatra the VII'th later learned of this method and used it successfully.

Another method used by poorer Indians was to place a thin net over the house entrance and windows, fill it with straw soaked in water, the wind will cool evaporating water, which will cool the building by up to 10 degrees.

There are many other methods, it would be interesting to try some of them.
 

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I live in the heat currently so I can handle it to a degree...:-D

Seriously tho I can tolerate for long periods about 95 degrees once it starts getting hotter than that i feel like a California raisin minus the cool shades...In direct sunlight I do not fair very well. I'm made for the cold.

Inside I keep my thermostat at 70 Fahrenheit during the warm and hot months. I am most comfortable at 70 to 72 degrees. any warmer i become uncomfortable. for cold I can tolorate cold much better than heat and love the cold. coldest I've felt is -28C in Canada.
 

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First of all -- I hate humidity, and we get our fair share of it here in the mid-Atlantic. So, we are just now entering what I consider to be the best time of the year -- October. The humidity slides away while the daytime temps stay great, usually in the 60s to low 70s. (I'll let you folks who are metric challenged do the conversions ::clapping::)
I walk 365 days a year -- minus just a few days. I love the Fall, Winter, and early Spring. In the Winter, I dress for whatever the conditions are. I can stay warm AND DRY even when the temps approach 0 degrees F, with a stiff breeze and/or snow. During the summer months, I am uncomfortable, but still walk -- we just go late in the evening.

As for inside - we keep our house between 66 in the winter and 76 in the summer.
 

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I enjoyed Cody's book as well and recommend it.

When I built the home at Slippy Lodge we asked our architect to research Passive Solar Designs. Since we are in the SouthEastern US, heat is our concern. Wide porches on the SW and NE exposure help keep the sun from directly coming through our windows. Our main room allows us to open windows and doors that are protected by screened windows or screened porches and allow for a cross breeze to help cool the house. We also put in unconventional Transom Style windows on one side of the home. The smaller windows allow for less heat or cool loss through the walls and less sun to enter into the room. We also have high ceilings which allow for the heat to rise and comfortably cool the rooms.

Even when its 100 F outside and 90% humidity, our home feels much cooler than it is when the air conditioning is set at 78-82 F. In a grid down situation, my plan is to have solar to power a few ceiling fans which help cool a person. As long as we had a breeze, 90 F would be tolerable given a "break in period".

The humidity would be our biggest enemy without air conditioning.

As far as cold, anything below 50 F inside would be difficult until you got used to it.
 

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Our temps here can go to -35 f. in winter to about 95 f. in summer.winter is not so bad in that range,a little snow throwing,a little snowshoeing while walking the dog(she loves the snow)its all good. the summers and other two seasons are not so bad,we hang around lake Superior and swim,hang at the beach,hike.its all good.
 

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Temperature does not bother me much. I am plenty happy with any temp between -30F and +90F as long as I do not have to deal with humidity. The first time I spent any significant time in the desert SW, I was surprised at how comfortable 95F feels in the shade with a slight breeze. I am also surprised how miserable 75F can feel in the summer if the humidity is high.
 

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Temperature does not bother me much. I am plenty happy with any temp between -30F and +90F as long as I do not have to deal with humidity. The first time I spent any significant time in the desert SW, I was surprised at how comfortable 95F feels in the shade with a slight breeze. I am also surprised how miserable 75F can feel in the summer if the humidity is high.
Amen Inor,humidity is the devil near the lake here.when I was growing up in the central valley of commiefornia,(before it was commie)95-105 was not bad at all it was so dry there you could work a field all day and never really bring on a sweat
 

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I thrive in the cold and merely survive through the Alabama summers.

Before getting married, the heater was used only to keep the indoor plants from dying. Now, things are different in the Denton House.
 

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Summer in the panhandle of Florida can be brutal. This August my truck registered a temp of 101 at the house and as we got closer to town it went up to 107 add in 70 to 80% humidity and you get a heat index of 120 or so. That being said in summer the thermostat is at 78 and in winter 70, ceiling fans go year round we just reverse them in the winter. Our place in the mountains of Tennessee we have no air conditioning and heat is from a wood burning stove, even when it gets to 90 in the summer it will get down to 70 at night. When we get too hot in the summer we just go down to the creek with a cold beverage and have a seat in the water. Water temp is usually between 58 and 65 degrees, depending on recent rains. More rain = colder water. My wife and I have murphy beds on the front porch and usually sleep there summer and winter. A good sleeping bag one dog each in the winter and we sleep like babys.
 

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I can handle the heat just fine. I am acclimated to temps over 100 degrees. The biggest tips I can give for extreme heat is to drink lots and lots of water and slow down. That is a double edged sword to be acclimated to high heat though. I get cold when it's below 70 in the house. I just put on a long sleeved shirt or a jacket. As for the cold, when it's 5 am and under 30 degrees in the deer stand I am nice and toasty in my coveralls. That's the one thing I like about cold, you can dress right and remain comfortable. When it's hot, there's only so much clothing you can take off.

I read both of Codys books on kindle and I liked them so much I ordered the hard copy of 98.6. Lots of good info in it and it's very readable. He sends his message with humor. I like the guy, he's alright for a hippy.
 
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