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9 Cities In America Running Out Of Water - | Intellihub.com

Below are 9 examples of different cities that are running dangerously low on water, hopefully you don't call one of these cities home.



Water is one of our most precious and neglected natural resources. Without an abundant water supply life as we know would not exist. Everyday we take for granted the fact that we turn on the faucet and an unlimited supply of blue gold is delivered to our door step.

Unfortunately that day may soon come to an end as the water supply in many U.S. cities are dangerously low due to extreme drought. I can only imagine the future where water restrictions will dwarf the regulations you see today.

Below are 9 examples of different cities that are running dangerously low on water, hopefully you don't call one of these cities home.

9. Santa Fe, N.M.
> Extreme drought coverage (2013): 76.7%
> Exceptional drought coverage (2013): 16.7%
> Population: 89,284

The entirety of the Santa Fe area has been in a state of exceptional drought - the worst possible type - for the past five weeks. Already, the area has been consistently under extreme drought - the second-worst level - since mid-February. The drought in much of the state contributed to the rapid spreading of the Tres Lagunas fire which burned 16 square miles of land - the equivalent of close to a third of the size of the Santa Fe urban area - near the city earlier this summer. However, according to the NOAA, drought conditions in much of the state are expected to improve through the end of the summer and into the fall.

8. Albuquerque, N.M.
> Extreme drought coverage (2013): 76.7%
> Exceptional drought coverage (2013): 43.3%
> Population: 741,318

The majority of the state of New Mexico is in a state of extreme drought. The state's largest city, Albuquerque, has been completely under the worst possible level of drought since the end of April. This is the city's second major drought in the last three years - it was under extreme drought for most of 2011. Much-needed heavy storms hit the area last week, but experts caution this is likely not enough to help the parched land fully recover. National Weather Service meteorologist Chuck Jones told the Associated Press, "It's making a little dent in places … but [the drought] is something that developed over several years … and it will take several years for the state to recover, assuming we get normal or above normal monsoons."Jones also noted that Albuquerque was roughly a year behind its average three-year rainfall.

7. Corpus Christi, Texas
> Extreme drought coverage (2013): 79.1%
> Exceptional drought coverage (2013): 14.1%
> Population: 320,069

Nearly all of Corpus Christi has been in a state of extreme drought since early March. As a result, the city enacted restrictions on the use of water in late June. Among the mandatory restrictions are a ban on the residential use of sprinklers and car washing more than once a week, as well as the restriction of washing sidewalks and homes, unless expressly done for business or public-health purposes. In the city of Kenedy, about halfway between Corpus Christi and San Antonio, water shortage and well failures led to the city diverting water from the local prison. This left inmates unable to shower for a week.

6. Brownsville, Texas
> Extreme drought coverage (2013): 81.1%
> Exceptional drought coverage (2013): 10.1%
> Population: 217,585

Since 2011, there has been a total of two weeks in which Brownsville, Texas, was not in at least a state of low-level drought. There have been extreme drought conditions for past the 23 straight weeks. According to The Brownsville Herald, as of early July, the last substantial rain in the area was April 28. The city announced a voluntary water restriction in April, asking residents to avoid non-essential use, particularly for lawn irrigation. Brownsville is the largest city in the Rio Grande Valley in southern Texas, which has had an ongoing dispute with Mexico for the country's failure to deliver water to the valley as agreed in a 1944 treaty.

5. Harlingen, Texas
> Extreme drought coverage (2013): 83.6%
> Exceptional drought coverage (2013): 11.5%
> Population: 135,663

The entirety of the Harlingen urban area has been in a state extreme drought since early March. In fact, more than 56% of the area on average has been under extreme drought since the start of 2011. Many farmers have found that they are unable to grow cotton and corn due to the drought, or raise livestock because of the rising cost of animal feed. The area's drought is expected to persist through the fall, according to the NOAA.

4. Colorado Springs, Colo.
> Extreme drought coverage (2013): 89.2%
> Exceptional drought coverage (2013): 4.7%
> Population: 559,409

For roughly a year straight, at least some part of the Colorado Springs urban area has been in a state of extreme drought. The city's water capacity was just 57% as of July 21, a time of year when it is normally nearly 85%. Colorado Springs Utilities spokesperson Patrice Lehermeier noted, "We don't want to say it's becoming the norm, but dry conditions in Colorado is something we're going to be facing, especially in Colorado Springs, for a long time," As a local news station quoted. The NOAA projects that most of Colorado, including the Colorado Springs area, will be in a state or continued or worsening drought at least through the fall. Heavy rains in southern Colorado last week have eased some of the residents' worries, but officials have cautioned that the region is by no means out of the woods.

3. McAllen, Texas
> Extreme drought coverage (2013): 100%
> Exceptional drought coverage (2013): 56.5%
> Population: 728,825

Like much of the southern part of Texas bordering Mexico - known as the Rio Grande Valley - McAllen has been in a state of severe, prolonged water shortage. Excepting a four-week period in late May/early June, at least some part of the area has been in a state of severe drought for 127 straight weeks. Portions of the area have been affected by the worst possible level of drought since September, 2012. The NOAA projects that drought conditions in the area will persist or intensify at least through October. In April, the city implemented phase 2 of its drought contingency plan. The plan includes mandatory water conservation, which limits the washing of vehicles, irrigation of lawns, and the refilling of swimming pools.

2. Pueblo, Colo.
> Exceptional drought coverage (2013): 71.2%
> Extreme drought coverage (2013): 100%
> Population: 136,550

Arguably, no large urban area has faced worse drought than Pueblo this year. The entire area has been in a state of at least the second-worst possible drought level from the start of the year through the third week of July. On average, more than 70% of the Pueblo was affected by exceptional drought, higher than any other area with a population of 75,000 or more. According to KOAA, Pueblo had received just 3.77 inches of rainfall through July 22, nearly half of the 7.15 inches on average it normally receives by that date. The NOAA expects drought to remain a problem in the Pueblo area through the fall.

1. Lubbock, Texas
> Exceptional drought coverage (2013): 62.8%
> Extreme drought coverage (2013): 100%
> Population: 237,356

Nearly half of the Lubbock area on average has been in a state of exceptional drought since 2011, worse than anywhere else in the nation with a population of more than 75,000. During that time, more than three quarters of the area was under exceptional drought in an average week, also worse than anywhere else in the nation. In April, to encourage water conservation, the city of Lubbock changed its water rate structure to penalize heavier users. Nothing illustrates the area's water problems better than White River Lake, which is located 70 miles south of Lubbock. The lake may be just a few weeks away from being unable to deliver water to 10,000 residents, according to The Associated Press.
 

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Interesting,no prob here,we live next to the largest fresh water lake in CONUS,I feel sorry for all the thirsty people though.time for desalinazationplants.
 

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It's sad. Most desert territories still see 3-6 inches a year which is plenty if people would just learn to collect it. A 1000 sq ft roof yields a years supply I think with just a few inches. The math is out there.
 

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And I have been complaining about all the rain we have had this summer in the south. It its the first year in sometime that we have not been in a drought.
 

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LOL :)

You haven't heard? Moonbeam is going to build them a new canal "under" the delta for $30 billion to ship So Cal more of Nor Cal's water; and the best part is Nor Cal helps pay to ship So Cal their water. What a country right!

It was funny a few farmers in Nor Cal posted political message signs on their properties denouncing the plan, and Moonbeam ordered them taken down and the property owners cited for displaying campaign signs outside of campaign season. So much for free campaign speech.

I'm surprised southern California isn't on the list nor cities in Arizona like Phoenix.
 

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How's this for irony? The West Texas area indicated on the map is also where a large concentration of the Fracking boom is at/

What do they use to Frack? Yep, water.

I'm not anti fracking in any way, but that area needs to find a safe alternative medium other than what is their precious elixir of life.
 

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LOL :)

You haven't heard? Moonbeam is going to build them a new canal "under" the delta for $30 billion to ship So Cal more of Nor Cal's water; and the best part is Nor Cal helps pay to ship So Cal their water. What a country right!

It was funny a few farmers in Nor Cal posted political message signs on their properties denouncing the plan, and Moonbeam ordered them taken down and the property owners cited for displaying campaign signs outside of campaign season. So much for free campaign speech.
Unbelievable!

I haven't kept up with the news in California since leaving there 10 years ago. I remember in San Diego having water restrictions and some really crazy ideas on how the city was going to replace the dwindling supply of water to include recycling the water from the treated sewage.
 

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PLENTY of solar energy, PLENTY of salt water to refine... Californians seriously struggling over a palatable water supply is just... Lets just say it's hard to have sympathy.

Christ! Does NOBODY out there realize how easy and cheap it is to distill water? Sure they do. But there are political pockets to be lined here!

In case the technology is eluding.. Yeah, they may choose something on a bit of a larger scale than a 2 litter pop bottle. :D

View attachment 2331
 

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Australians are investing heavily in De-salination plants - but its an awfully expensive way to get fresh drinking water

The alternative is what they do in Vegas I guess recycle all water

My mother and father visited Papa New Guinea in the 1960s they said even back then tribes would go to war over who owns the local watering hole.
 

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Australians are investing heavily in De-salination plants - but its an awfully expensive way to get fresh drinking water

The alternative is what they do in Vegas I guess recycle all water

My mother and father visited Papa New Guinea in the 1960s they said even back then tribes would go to war over who owns the local watering hole.
Recycled, filtered, purified, no matter what they do, I think the desalinated sea water at any expense is just going to go down smoother than "Old Poo Water". That's just me though. :D
 

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Want to hear something else sad about this. We live 20 miles from Lubbock,TX. As preppers we constantly look for way to conserve resources and make do with less. Lubbock has NO water rationing!! They say they do such as odd even watering and fining big users. This summer every fire hydrant was flushed sending about 1000 gal down the street. I know they have to be serviced but there has to be a better way. Also the farms (cotton and milo(used for ethenol) use huge amounts. Like 5-6 million gallons per field per year. It seems no one worrys about the long term here.
 

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High capacity wells are being drilled like crazy for all kinds of things, irrigation and fracking are the two big ones. Some of that water does not ever reenter the evaporative cycle in the area it was taken from.
 

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Australians are investing heavily in De-salination plants - but its an awfully expensive way to get fresh drinking water

The alternative is what they do in Vegas I guess recycle all water

My mother and father visited Papa New Guinea in the 1960s they said even back then tribes would go to war over who owns the local watering hole.
I was in Canberra not long ago and noted that the house downspouts went into some type of drain and not out into the street like in the US. I asked and was told that the water is captured back into the water treatment facility.
 

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How Much Water Can You Collect in Rain Barrels During a Rainfall

600 gallon 1 inch from. 1000' sq foot roof. 2 inches enough for two people and a k9
I have a 10k gallon catchment system in my back yard. I do know that with just the square footage of the pool it collects quite a bit of water. 2" yesterday alone after a storm. I also know that rigging the water to flow from my roof into the pool would significantly add to that in a SHTF scenario.

I've also filled a 150gallon water tank on a boat in very little time with a hard rain by spreading out a large tarp across the boat.
 
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