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Converting Your Lawn to More Practical Uses...

This is a discussion on Converting Your Lawn to More Practical Uses... within the Recycling, Composting, Reducing, Reuse, Environment forums, part of the Off-Grid Lifestyle category; Originally Posted by Old SF Guy Do trees follow normal biology, in that it takes two to tango and bear fruit? Not an arborist, but ...

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Thread: Converting Your Lawn to More Practical Uses...

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Old SF Guy View Post
    Do trees follow normal biology, in that it takes two to tango and bear fruit? Not an arborist, but I've done some messed up stuff in trees.....just sayin ?
    Excellent Question!

    Some fruit bearing plants like Blue Berries need more than one Blueberry Bush to produce fruit. Others do not.

    A Lemon Tree does not need two trees but for some damn reason our's only produces fruit every other year but then again we are in a USDA Planting Zone much farther north than recommended and our tree is in a container which causes some additional challenges with soil goodness.

    All fruit bearing trees and plants NEED POLLINATORS. Like bees.

    There is a chance that @Inor 's tree is a non fruit bearing hybrid Lemontree in which case he should go to the hippy that sold him it and punch them in the face.
    Last edited by Slippy; 08-08-2019 at 06:42 PM.
    bigwheel, Old SF Guy and Inor like this.

  2. #22
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    Converting Your Lawn to More Practical Uses...-img_1525.jpg

    This is Spike. Spike is our non-fruit bearing Lemon Tree. We grew Spike from a Lemon Seed and he grew to about 6' tall and smelled wonderful and seemed to be a natural mosquito repellant. Spike never grew a lemon. One day, we left Spike out on the back porch and a huge storm came and knocked Spike over and broke his trunk.

    I trimmed it but it has not grown one millimeter since the storm. I keep Spike fertilized with simple 10-10-10 Fertilizer. Spike still smells good but looks pretty sad.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigwheel View Post
    Yall need to get busy and plan turnips. Last batch I did we had fresh turnipes all winter to go in in stew.
    And the greens are very good, too.
    I like to dice up turnips and cook them in a pot of rice.
    Denton and bigwheel like this.
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  5. #24
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    Left unchecked, many fruit trees will get into a rhythm of heavy fruit production one year followed by a lousy yield the next year. Peach is a good example of this. In the good year the trees will ofter over produce to the point of the excess fruit breaking the tree limbs. This over stresses the tree so production the following year is poor. Professional growers try to even out annual production by thinning fruit and properly trimming the tree limbs. I have been trying to master this technique for years without success. Last year I had tons of peaches on one tree. This year I got one peach! Not sure about lemon trees.
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  6. #25
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    I plant all my peppers and tomatoes along the back back fence behind the garage, ( Only good place to plant ) the last two or three years I was getting a good crop except this year. I am not sure what happened, All the peppers where going gang busters till a couple of weeks ago and then they all died, like over night. Tomato plants too. Kept them well watered and fed them, not sure what happened. I guess I go back to the drawing board next year.
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  7. #26
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    This year has been tough in the garden. My sweet peppers are not doing very good. Tomatoes are fair but nothing to brag about. I’m chocking it up to the extremely wet spring and early summer. That, and it’s probably Trump’s fault!

  8. #27
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    For larger lemons and oranges you need to remove (pinch off) excess fruit so the tree and concentrate it's energy on producing larger fruit. Generally about 2-3 fruit per limb. Lemons require a ton of nitrogen or the leaves turn yellow and the fruit stays green.

    We have potted lemons so we can bring them inside the sunroom during the colder months.
    Last edited by Elvis; 08-09-2019 at 07:53 PM.
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  9. #28
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    We need to make better use of our open land. I got tired of bush hogging it so I fenced most of it and tossed a few cows in leaving me about 3 acres to mow which is still too much. I'm now considering putting cows on half the remaining unused land to further reduce the grass cutting.
    bigwheel likes this.

  10. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slippy View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_1525.JPG 
Views:	9 
Size:	2.26 MB 
ID:	99577

    This is Spike. Spike is our non-fruit bearing Lemon Tree. We grew Spike from a Lemon Seed and he grew to about 6' tall and smelled wonderful and seemed to be a natural mosquito repellant. Spike never grew a lemon. One day, we left Spike out on the back porch and a huge storm came and knocked Spike over and broke his trunk.

    I trimmed it but it has not grown one millimeter since the storm. I keep Spike fertilized with simple 10-10-10 Fertilizer. Spike still smells good but looks pretty sad.
    I'm sure spike is fixing to grow his roots. He looks very healthy.

  11. #30
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    All fruit bearing trees and plants NEED POLLINATORS. Like bees.
    There are many self-pollinating plants. Tomatoes come to mind.

    All the peppers where going gang busters till a couple of weeks ago and then they all died, like over night.
    Do you by chance have a problem with moles? The overnight part suggests that something's happening to the root system. I can't think of anything top side that would kill peppers over night. And unchecked population of hornworms could devastate plants seemingly over night, but not kill them out right.

 

 
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