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Cooking with your stockpile

This is a discussion on Cooking with your stockpile within the Recipes forums, part of the Food, Health and Fitness Survival category; I found that thread: https://www.prepperforums.net/forum/g...ner-preps.html...

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Thread: Cooking with your stockpile

  1. #11
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    Annie likes this.

  2. #12
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    Mung Beans is popular in the Asian community. I'm cooking some right now, to use up what I found sitting at the back of the pantry (old, half a bag with no due date). I know I hadn't had mung beans in at least 2 years, so this opened bag must really be old. I followed a soup recipe way back, and it was really good.

    The cooking instructions in some of those packages are exaggerated. This one (from Australia) says to soak them overnight, and cook for 2-3 hours. I didn't soak mine, and I bet they'll be done in 30 minutes, or even less.
    Just checked them out, they're already soft to be edible and they've been simmering only for 15 minutes or less! Imagine how much less time it would've been had I soaked them overnight!

    It can be eaten as soup, or poured on steamed jasmine rice (that's how I was introduced to it, and that was a heavy stick-to-your-ribs meal).


    MUNG BEAN SOUP

    1. Boil 1 cup mung beans (I'm using the green kind) in 3 cups water, using a larger pot. Add a little salt and simmer until soft (it will take about 20-30 minutes). Set aside.

    2. In another sauce pan, saute' lots of garlic and onions with oil. Add any meat you want (I'm using chicken thigh boneless meat, cut into pieces). I would've used shrimps, but I'm out of it. Add one can of diced tomatoes, and salt, and pepper. Cook and stir until bubbling. Remove from heat.

    3. Now we go back to the mung beans. Pulse the beans in a food processor, or process it with a stick wand (like the one used by cooks) to puree the beans. If you don't puree the beans, the skin of the beans will affect the texture of the soup. You can still eat it, but I find it really good without that skin. Try it and see how you like it with the skin.

    4. When the beans is pureed enough to your liking, add the sauteed tomatoes into it. Stir. If it's too thick, add broth, or tomato juice, or water. Adjust the consistency to your liking.
    Heat it again on low, and let it simmer for a few minutes, adjust the seasonings to your liking.

    I'm adding chopped fresh spinach, and was going to add parsley (which I just found out I don't have!). Anyway, it's done, and ready to serve.
    Last edited by charito; 09-02-2017 at 06:16 AM.

  3. #13
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    Since mung beans is the beans I'm going to stock a lot of (need less time cooking and the protein content isn't that different from the other kinds of beans), I'll find various ways to use them. Years ago, a co-worker brought this dish and it was sooooo good.
    I tried cooking this before, but it was an epic fail!
    Now when I saw this video, I knew where I'd gone wrong. I'll do this again one of these days.


    Toasted Mung Beans in Coconut Milk (with sticky rice)





    It can be eaten without the coconut milk (can substitute powdered milk). It's that toasty taste to it that makes it good.

    I wonder if it will be good with oats instead of sticky rice? Just boil the cracked toasted beans until they're soft before adding the oats? I'll have to try that one out.
    Last edited by charito; 09-02-2017 at 06:26 AM.

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  5. #14
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    Mung beans, huh? That's a new one on me. I'll look it up.

  6. #15
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    I've found that getting the rice cooked well is key to a lot of great prepper meals. I learned rice turns out really well if you saute it first in a little oil, then add spices (some I like are chili pwdr, onion pwdr, garlic pwdr, and salt but you can mix it up with others for the sake of variety). Then add the water. Cover, bring to a boil, keep the pot covered and turn the heat down as low as you can get it while it finishes cooking. Comes out really well this way. Thanks katzcradul!


    charito likes this.
    “Our business is to gain heaven. Everything else is a sheer waste of time.”
    -St. Vincent DePaul

  7. #16
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    My wife is pretty touchy about eating "expired" foods. No amount of explaining seems to work. So, all our canned foods are rotated thru our regular pantry to use them before they "expire". I remember in service around 1968 eating my first C-ration. It was dated 1954. I guess it doesn't bother me because my mother canned everything we grew on the farm and later in her huge garden in town. My dry foods are all put in aluminized Mylar bags. I consider myself lucky in that I have the equipment to do a Nitrogen purge (like commercial food processors) on the bags before putting the Oxygen absorbers in the bags. One thing I found was Mylar bags with ziplock seals. Helps to keep the Nitrogen in the bag, and keeps the Oxygen out until I heat seal the bag. And of course, once I open the bag, it keeps critters and dirt out of the bag.
    Annie and charito like this.
    I really want one of these!Hidden Content

  8. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by paraquack View Post
    My wife is pretty touchy about eating "expired" foods. No amount of explaining seems to work. So, all our canned foods are rotated thru our regular pantry to use them before they "expire". I remember in service around 1968 eating my first C-ration. It was dated 1954. I guess it doesn't bother me because my mother canned everything we grew on the farm and later in her huge garden in town. My dry foods are all put in aluminized Mylar bags. I consider myself lucky in that I have the equipment to do a Nitrogen purge (like commercial food processors) on the bags before putting the Oxygen absorbers in the bags. One thing I found was Mylar bags with ziplock seals. Helps to keep the Nitrogen in the bag, and keeps the Oxygen out until I heat seal the bag. And of course, once I open the bag, it keeps critters and dirt out of the bag.
    I hear your wife loud and clear.
    I opened a can of expired red kidney beans to use for chili (not long-expired either) - it's full of bubbles. Bubbles are a red flag - but mind you, beans are full of gas! So I opened a new one to compare - no bubbles at all.
    Food poisoning would be one of the killlers in SHTF.

    Anyway, rotating the canned stuff will ensure the quality of your food.
    Last edited by charito; 10-13-2017 at 06:03 AM.
    sideKahr likes this.

  9. #18
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    SKILLET RICE #1

    Ingredients:

    Parboiled rice (this is like converted rice, but a whole lot cheaper than buying Uncle Ben's)
    Spam - cut into cubes (browned, and set aside)
    Cream of chicken (or soup powder or bouillion)
    Water (depends on how much rice you're using)
    Carrots
    Corn
    Garlic powder, black pepper, salt to taste
    a little bit of sugar (substitute for msg)
    A little bit of cooking oil (use the oil that you used for browning the Spam)


    1. Lightly toast the rice on the oil. Add the water, scraping off bits from skillet. Bring to boil.
    2. Add the cream of chicken (or your powder), and the garlic powder, black pepper, and sugar. Bring to simmer. Cover.
    3. When rice is half-done, add the spam and the vegetables. Bring to simmer, and cover until rice is done.

    If you want your dish with some sauce in it, add more liquid like milk (powdered milk). If you want it dry, remove the cover in the last few minutes of cooking, stirring every now and then.



    You can substitute Tomato-based ingredients like pasta sauce with the cream of chicken, and use stock or water, as added liquid.

  10. #19
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    SKILLET RICE #2



    Ingredients:

    Parboiled rice
    Corned beef (broken apart in chunks)
    green beans (drained. save the juice)
    Chick peas, or any cooked beans (optional)
    Soup powder, or bouillion
    tomatoes or tomato-based items like tomato juice (optional)
    Water
    Garlic powder, salt, onion powder, black pepper, and a little bit of sugar


    1. Lightly toast rice in a little oil. Add the chickpeas, and a little salt. Stir around.
    2. Add water, green bean juice, tomatoes and soup powder. Bring to boil, then lower to simmer for about 10 minutes, covered.
    3. Add the corned beef, stirring. Cover again and let simmer till rice is done.
    4. Add the green beans, stir and cook until heated through.

  11. #20
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    Use Kraft Dinner to make copycat Hamburger Helper. Save those cheese packets (write expiration date), if you're not going to use them.


    CHEESE-BURGER "Hamburger Helper"


    Brown, and drain excess fat off medium ground beef. Saute chopped onions, garlic and any color peppers into it.
    Add some diced tomatoes (including some of its juice), and some stock or soup powder and water. Season with Italian seasoning, or any spice you want. Add salt. Bring to boil. Simmer long enough to get the flavor of the beef to come out.

    Add the Kraft Dinner macaroni. Add some milk (optional). Adjust seasonings to your liking.
    Bring to boil, then lower heat to simmer. Cover. Kraft Dinner macaroni doesn't take too long to get cooked - check for doneness.
    When it's done, remove from heat. Add the cheese powder.



    I tend to add either Chiz Whiz or some Kraft cheese slices to it, to give it an extra cheese flavor.

    This dish is versatile, depending on the ingredients and spices you use. You can make it saucy by adding more
    liquid (and thickening it with corn starch). You can even turn it into a comfort-food soup dish.
    Last edited by charito; 01-31-2018 at 06:51 AM.

 

 
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