Here's a site with TONS of Dutch Oven Recipes
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Here's a site with TONS of Dutch Oven Recipes

This is a discussion on Here's a site with TONS of Dutch Oven Recipes within the Recipes forums, part of the Food, Health and Fitness Survival category; Just Dutch Oven Recipes. Has tons of recipes, many that that would work for prepers! Just Dutch Oven Recipes - 6,643 recipes for you to ...

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  • 9 Post By itstimetobunker
  • 2 Post By SOCOM42
  • 3 Post By Mad Trapper
  • 4 Post By SOCOM42
  • 1 Post By shooter

Thread: Here's a site with TONS of Dutch Oven Recipes

  1. #1
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    Here's a site with TONS of Dutch Oven Recipes

    Just Dutch Oven Recipes. Has tons of recipes, many that that would work for prepers! Just Dutch Oven Recipes - 6,643 recipes for you to browse.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by itstimetobunker View Post
    Just Dutch Oven Recipes. Has tons of recipes, many that that would work for prepers! Just Dutch Oven Recipes - 6,643 recipes for you to browse.
    Now that is a lot!

    Have two #5? Griswold's with Lodge trivets.

    I remove the fire ring plate from my stove and insert.

  3. #3
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    You're set up then. Bought a wood-burning cook stove years ago, but have never test-run it. Plenty of iron skillets for summer cooking over a fire pit when firing up a wood stove would be brutal. One of my favorite recipes on the site is under venison-- I-44 Road Kill Stew : )

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  5. #4
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    I use mine during the winter when the wood is burning, stove serves a dual purpose then.

    Mostly stews are done and with a roast every other week or so.

    A piece of greased aluminum foil on top of the trivet works well for doing biscuits, they don't burn that way.
    Last edited by SOCOM42; 05-23-2020 at 04:13 PM.

  6. #5
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    Thanks for the link!

    Dutch ovens are a very useful cooking utensil, and nearly indestructible.

    I like using them outdoors next to the fire, placing hot coals on the lid, and raking out coals underneath as needed.

    From E. N. Woodcock, Fifty Years a Hunter and Trapper.

    Say, boys, the question of pork and beans leads me to ask how
    many of you who have a fireplace in your camp have a bean hole?
    Now, Bill and I had one in our camp, and I tell you we thought it
    fine and we did it in this way. We dug a hole in one corner of
    the fireplace about two and a half feet deep and about eighteen
    inches in diameter, using the regular old style of bake kettle. This
    is merely an iron pot, with a close fitting flange lid so as to seclude
    all dust and ashes, and we used it in this way. We would first
    rake a good lot of live coals from the fireplace into the bean hole,
    having the beans already in the kettle. Then we would put the
    kettle down in the hole and rake the hole full of live embers, being
    careful to cover the hole over with plenty of ashes.
    We prepared the beans about in this fashion: After washing
    we soaked them for about twelve hours. The water was drained
    off and the beans were then put into the kettle with the necessary
    trimmings, which consisted of a good chunk of pork put in the
    center of the beans, and two or three smaller pieces laid on top, a
    pinch of salt providing that the pork was not sufticiently salty.
    A spoonful of brown sugar or rather a little baking molasses and
    a little pepper. Now this kettle was allowed to remain three or
    four days in the hole without disturbing farther than to cover
    over occasionally with hot embers. You ask if beans are good
    baked this way—we guess yes. We have heard a great deal about
    the famous Boston baked beans, but we wish to say that they are
    not in it compared to beans baked in a bean hole.

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mad Trapper View Post
    Thanks for the link!

    Dutch ovens are a very useful cooking utensil, and nearly indestructible.

    I like using them outdoors next to the fire, placing hot coals on the lid, and raking out coals underneath as needed.

    From E. N. Woodcock, Fifty Years a Hunter and Trapper.

    Say, boys, the question of pork and beans leads me to ask how
    many of you who have a fireplace in your camp have a bean hole?
    Now, Bill and I had one in our camp, and I tell you we thought it
    fine and we did it in this way. We dug a hole in one corner of
    the fireplace about two and a half feet deep and about eighteen
    inches in diameter, using the regular old style of bake kettle. This
    is merely an iron pot, with a close fitting flange lid so as to seclude
    all dust and ashes, and we used it in this way. We would first
    rake a good lot of live coals from the fireplace into the bean hole,
    having the beans already in the kettle. Then we would put the
    kettle down in the hole and rake the hole full of live embers, being
    careful to cover the hole over with plenty of ashes.
    We prepared the beans about in this fashion: After washing
    we soaked them for about twelve hours. The water was drained
    off and the beans were then put into the kettle with the necessary
    trimmings, which consisted of a good chunk of pork put in the
    center of the beans, and two or three smaller pieces laid on top, a
    pinch of salt providing that the pork was not sufticiently salty.
    A spoonful of brown sugar or rather a little baking molasses and
    a little pepper. Now this kettle was allowed to remain three or
    four days in the hole without disturbing farther than to cover
    over occasionally with hot embers. You ask if beans are good
    baked this way—we guess yes. We have heard a great deal about
    the famous Boston baked beans, but we wish to say that they are
    not in it compared to beans baked in a bean hole.
    I have done this within my wood stove fire ring using navy beans, bacon and grandma's molasses.

    Sea salt and some pepper is also added to the mix,

    along with a 1/4 pound of uncooked bacon added that is cut into 1" pieces.

    Sometimes a little barbeque sauce is added to the mix, changing the series to avoid flavor burnout.

    The dried beans are pre-soaked for roughly 36 hours with two rinses done in the interim with warm water,

    and a little salt is added to the soak.

    Would stir the mix every few hours or so when cooking, better than Bush's beans by a long shot.

    Went great with the cornbread,

    done in the oven adaptor on the back side of the top behind the bean pot next to the chimney.

    It takes about 12-14 hours to do the pot on a low burn.

    Been using this method for about 20-25 years now.
    Last edited by SOCOM42; 05-23-2020 at 06:04 PM. Reason: sentence structure

  8. #7
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    Thanks for the link. Seeing all these recipes for my dutch ovens made my heart flutter with joy.
    itstimetobunker likes this.
    Irish Diplomacy:
    The ability to tell a man to go to hell and have him looking forward to the trip.

 

 

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