Welding Own Weapons
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Welding Own Weapons

This is a discussion on Welding Own Weapons within the Knives, Swords, Blades, Axes, Spears, Daggers, Machetes forums, part of the Weapons, Protection, Self Defense, Hand to Hand Combat category; Has anybody tried welding your own weapons? I've seen alot of videos lately of people making their own axes or blades out of steel. Just ...

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Thread: Welding Own Weapons

  1. #1
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    Welding Own Weapons

    Has anybody tried welding your own weapons? I've seen alot of videos lately of people making their own axes or blades out of steel. Just wanted to know if anyone here as done it and can share some tips!

  2. #2
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    Here is an example: I can't find the ones where they make a knife out of a slab of steel atm

  3. #3
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    There is a lot of work to make anyone of them.

    A heavy duty welder, a HT furnace or a huge torch, grinder, belt sander.

    That is just material things, you also need to have working knowledge of steels and HT.

    You could go to a used tool store and buy one for a few bucks even just a head and re-handle it.

    I make tools all the time as needed to complete jobs.

    I am a toolmaker/engineer by profession, have worked with my forge for over 55 years.

    But it would be good experience for a novice to give it try.

    The bag on the floor he put the bit in is a carburizing material such as Kasenit, just another thing you need to know how to use.

    The guy in the vid is no amateur either.
    Last edited by SOCOM42; 02-17-2020 at 09:54 AM.
    Bixon and hawgrider like this.

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  5. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by SOCOM42 View Post
    There is a lot of work to make anyone of them.

    A heavy duty welder, a HT furnace or a huge torch, grinder, belt sander.

    That is just material things, you also need to have working knowledge of steels and HT.

    You could go to a used tool store and buy one for a few bucks even just a head and re-handle it.

    I make tools all the time as needed to complete jobs.

    I am a toolmaker/engineer by profession, have worked with my forge for over 55 years.

    But it would be good experience for a novice to give it try.

    The bag on the floor he put the bit in is a carburizing material such as Kasenit, just another thing you need to know how to use.

    The guy in the vid is no amateur either.
    Ah yes, i understand this is no easy task but I have so much time on my hand to learn a few new skills that may help around the house. I've just been looking up welding machine reviews and guides to help me out. What other tools and types of metal would you look into for lets say, making my own full metal axe.

  6. #5
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    I have a 200 amp Miller MIG welder, holds a 50 pound spool of wire, not a toy.

    You should get one that is 220 VAC only and uses a shielding gas not the flux wire junk.

    They are not cheap, but is great to have for everything that breaks.

    Get it and learn to use it right, take an evening class at a local school for it.

    Then you can consider other parts of your quest.

    Here is a welding fixture I built and a part inserted that was welded.

    This particular application was done with a TIG welder not MIG but shown as a reference to my level of experience.

    All the knurled knobs and pin holders were done here also.

    Welding Own Weapons-new-camera-075.jpg
    Last edited by SOCOM42; 02-17-2020 at 10:29 AM.
    Bixon, Chiefster23, Inor and 2 others like this.

  7. #6
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    You might want to start out with a simple blacksmith forge/blower. You can make a lot of simple useful tools just with that. You'll need an anvil, hammers, tongs, chisels, etc too.
    dwight55 and SOCOM42 like this.

  8. #7
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    Forged in fire. TV show been around awhile
    SOCOM42 and Mad Trapper like this.
    New life as a house husband, major shift in duties.

    Karl Marx said, "Destroy their culture, rewrite their history. Ruin their art and literature, and defame their heroes, by offering fabrications to scandalize that which they considered good.
    After reading this Obama said I am on it.

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by SOCOM42 View Post
    I have a 200 amp Miller MIG welder, holds a 50 pound spool of wire, not a toy.

    You should get one that is 220 VAC only and uses a shielding gas not the flux wire junk.

    They are not cheap, but is great to have for everything that breaks.

    Get it and learn to use it right, take an evening class at a local school for it.

    Then you can consider other parts of your quest.

    Here is a welding fixture I built and a part inserted that was welded.

    This particular application was done with a TIG welder not MIG but shown as a reference to my level of experience.

    All the knurled knobs and pin holders were done here also.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	NEW CAMERA 075.JPG 
Views:	17 
Size:	4.71 MB 
ID:	103829
    The skill set goes farther than just making a knife or axe. The first step is taking what you have and at least trying . I do plan yo buy a good stick weld this year. (Old one died of old age.) Still a good thing to have here.
    Big reason I use the flux wire is cost. Unless it is something you must have the tanks for gas is a racket. Even using a small inexpensive one I have built the mounts and rebuild Sidecar suspensions to use better axles and wheel.
    This wheel was cut down 1 1/2 inch the axle and sleeve cut out and changed to a factory size axle that was cut to length. The reason was to put a wheel matching the bike on the sidecar that would allow the use of a car tire.
    Latter made hub cover for it. All the mounts that need to be made and changed were done with hand drill, grinder,sawsall and that cheap wire feed welder. Slower yes but it can be done. Of course I know darn well you know that.




    Last edited by Smitty901; 02-17-2020 at 12:36 PM.
    SOCOM42 likes this.
    New life as a house husband, major shift in duties.

    Karl Marx said, "Destroy their culture, rewrite their history. Ruin their art and literature, and defame their heroes, by offering fabrications to scandalize that which they considered good.
    After reading this Obama said I am on it.

  10. #9
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    Here is the opposite side of the part.

    The fixture rotates 360 degrees on two axis's, parts are welded at both ends.

    They are high precision parts, no rod was used, strictly a fusion weld.

    Like @Smitty901 , you can get away with a core machine for light work.

    But when doing multiple passes as fillers they fall off as being suitable.

    The shielding gas is a must for heavy work of variety, they have a submerged arc for heavy flat work.

    The machine I have is capable of running a 1/2 inch wide single pass, roughly the same deep.

    I built a 25 ton log splitter with it years ago and it is still being used today.

    As @Smitty901 said gasses are a bitch on prices, I own my own tanks and use argon, C25 and straight Co2

    in my shop along with Oxy/acetylene, there are some 18 tanks out there, many a back up for SHTF.

    A good thing is the machines have solenoid valves that only allow the gas to flow when welding with a small overrun.

    Another point, high carbon steels need to be pre-heated before welding otherwise the weld will crack.

    There is a lot to learn about metals, working them and the assorted tools to be used.

    I started out in 1956 with a Forney "buzz box" and a stick at the local welding shop, it is an AC only machine.

    Before Henry would let me use it, I was to learn how to do it with a gas torch, which I did under his supervision.

    Using a TIG torch is just like using a gas torch but with instant results, the crossover was like magic.

    Just had to learn how much amperage to apply.

    All three still have their place today, as much so here as always.

    This is not a welding shop, but welding was part of the fabrication process we undertook.


    Welding Own Weapons-new-camera-073.jpg
    Last edited by SOCOM42; 02-18-2020 at 09:05 AM.
    Smitty901 and Mad Trapper like this.

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by SOCOM42 View Post
    Here is the opposite side of the part.

    The fixture rotates 360 degrees on two axis's, parts are welded at both ends.

    They are high precision parts, no rod was used, strictly a fusion weld.

    Like @Smitty901 , you can get away with a core machine for light work.

    But when doing multiple passes as fillers they fall off as being suitable.

    The shielding gas is a must for heavy work of variety, they have a submerged arc for heavy flat work.

    The machine I have is capable of running a 1/2 inch wide single pass, roughly the same deep.

    I built a 25 ton log splitter with it years ago and it is still being used today.

    As @Smitty901 said gasses are a bitch on prices, I own my own tanks and use argon, C25 and straight Co2

    in my shop along with Oxy/acetylene, there are some 18 tanks out there, many a back up for SHTF.

    A good thing is the machines have solenoid valves that only allow the gas to flow when welding with a small overrun.

    Another point, high carbon steels need to be pre-heated before welding otherwise the weld will crack.

    There is a lot to learn about metals, working them and the assorted tools to be used.

    I started out in 1956 with a Forney "buzz box" and a stick at the local welding shop, it is an AC only machine.

    Before Henry would let me use it, I was to learn how to do it with a gas torch, which I did under his supervision.

    Using a TIG torch is just like using a gas torch but with instant results, the crossover was like magic.

    Just had to learn how much amperage to apply.

    All three still have there place today, as much so here as always.

    This is not a welding shop, but welding was part of the fabrication process we undertook.


    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	NEW CAMERA 073.JPG 
Views:	15 
Size:	4.51 MB 
ID:	103853
    I wish I could be a student of yours @SOCOM42 .

    As a youngster, I learned how to forge, gas/electric weld, some machining. Never had the equipment to learn/go farther. Still I have been able to fix/fabricate on a "McGuyver" level.
    Slippy and SOCOM42 like this.

 

 

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