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Fire, best tool hardest prep?

This is a discussion on Fire, best tool hardest prep? within the General Talk forums, part of the General Discussion category; While fire is man's best tool, is it also the hardest thing to be prepared against? Is there any way other than fleeing to ensure ...

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Thread: Fire, best tool hardest prep?

  1. #1
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    Fire, best tool hardest prep?

    While fire is man's best tool, is it also the hardest thing to be prepared against?
    Is there any way other than fleeing to ensure that fire won't/can't spoil all prepreperations?
    bigwheel and RedLion like this.

  2. #2
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    A close friend of mine who has a sizable bank account built essentially a gun bunker, he has a large collection of Pendleton safes in there, his tastes in general ( or so as I view them ) are more on the fashion end of the spectrum rather than the function. He had a sprinkler system installed into this vault, he has two tank reserved for the use of this sprinkler system, not to mention several fire extinguishers. He really went out of his way and spent more money than most of us could imagine trying to make this as hell-proof as possible.

    There are two things I do wish to expand your question on, the first is timing, the second is intention of this fire.

    There's an expiration date on everything just about, fire extinguishers go bad, pumps and hoses cease to work given the proper amount of time and lack of care. So if this fire is per say within five years roughly after S.H.T.F and what-have-you has happened one of your best bets in my opinion so long as you catch it in time would be a fire extinguisher. After roughly five years especially exposed to elements and other things a fire extinguisher will be just about useless, so make sure to keep some five gallon pales handy and a few 55 gallon drums for rain water.

    Intention of this fire can also greatly affect how you combat it, if it is an accident and you believe you can fight it re-read my previous paragraph, if it is natural, I would suggest something underground, or if your nearest neighbor is a tree, cut it down, If I was on the west coast, particularly in California ( thankfully I'm not ) and I was in modern suburbia ( that thought alone creeps me out ) and it was after T.E.O.T.W.A.W.K.I and my neighbors moved out I would get to demolishing their house, if you could do a controlled burn. Reduce the risk of flammable material around you so you reduce welcoming a fire in. And if it is an intentional fire i.e roaming marauders who want to ruin your day, I'd suggest the firearm section of the forums.

    From a building aspect you could look into fire insulation, I used it heavily in my bunker and a panic room. There's also special formulas of concrete which have higher heat ratings which could certainly help in some chemical fires.
    Slippy and Swimmer1 like this.
    A man never truly knows how good he is with a gun until that gun is his last resort to live.

    “Everything's fine today… that is our illusion.” – Voltaire

    One cannot appreciate the light until you have seen the darkness

  3. #3
    The Good Cop


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    After a wildfire came down our road, we completely cleared all trees and underbrush from about two acres around the house and barns.
    "There is nothing so exhilarating as to be shot at without result." Winston Churchill
    "Leave the artillerymen alone, they are an obstinate lot." Napoleon
    Member: VFW, American Legion, Vietnam Veterans of America, Society of the 5th Infantry Division, Sons of the American Revolution.

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  5. #4
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    Lots of good ideas Grinch2. Not a lot of subterranean options due to the water table. Guess that "Backed by a Preserve" selling point should have been avoided?
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  6. #5
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    As mentioned by rice paddy daddy clear the area. Age old measure that works. Steel roof. If you live in a wooded area Steel roof will go a long ways in preventing your place from burning down, and last a long time.
    Swimmer1 likes this.
    New life as a house husband, major shift in duties.

    Karl Marx said, "Destroy their culture, rewrite their history. Ruin their art and literature, and defame their heroes, by offering fabrications to scandalize that which they considered good.
    After reading this Obama said I am on it.

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swimmer1 View Post
    While fire is man's best tool, is it also the hardest thing to be prepared against?
    Is there any way other than fleeing to ensure that fire won't/can't spoil all prepreperations?
    Good point and thats why cops cant figure out why firemen run into a burning building as opposed to out like the smart folks.
    Swimmer1 likes this.

  8. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swimmer1 View Post
    Lots of good ideas Grinch2. Not a lot of subterranean options due to the water table. Guess that "Backed by a Preserve" selling point should have been avoided?
    Concrete structure then, whether it's block or poured, and then really all you have to worry about is certain chemicals which burn concrete i.e the nope chemicals which nothing can really survive. But for 99.99991/2 of incidents standard concrete especially higher tolerance concrete will do just fine! And if you really wanted your concrete structure more protected, you can build it above ground and mound material over it. I've shot at over one hundred different quarries and all of them have massive stock piles of stripped overburden you could probably get for a decent price if you you were so inclined to protect your structure even further. My friend who I mentioned further paid pretty much what it costs for the quarry to send about fifty loads of fill out to his place, he dug his down to bedrock ( which if I'm not mistaken was around the 25-ish ft range ) and he essentially buried his bunker in 40ft of materials. He'll tell folks now who come if they have a keen eye for gradient that it was left over material from his foundation's excavation.

    With the fill option you have to figure it this way as well, if you say have some prior planning and can foresee a wild fire coming, wet down the overburden as much as you can reasonably. Wet dirt won't burn. Not to mention it will keep whatever is inside cool. Just my opinion, but if I could not bury it in the case of a high water table I would either blast it or build a structure above ground and un/naturally encase it. And for most people the latter of the two would be the most cost effective option. Thus for the relative most part you could avoid clearing brush and ground debris each year,
    A man never truly knows how good he is with a gun until that gun is his last resort to live.

    “Everything's fine today… that is our illusion.” – Voltaire

    One cannot appreciate the light until you have seen the darkness

  9. #8
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    In my case we are surrounded by fields with a few shade trees by the house so a grass fire is always a concern when things get dry. I keep the grass close to the house mowed short with a metal roof on the house. I hope to one day replace the wood siding with something like hardiboard to make it less flammable. All fuel cans are stored in a "garden box" far from the house. We keep 6 fire extinguishers scattered through the house and garage with more in the shop building.

    We often burn wood for heat but only in modern woodstoves with double walled pipes which I clean twice a year. Since this house is solar powered all of the major solar wire connections are inspected and tightened annually.

    Because of tempature regulation most of the long term food is stored inside the house but some is stored in a closet in the shop just in case we lost the home to something like fire. The shop is surrounded with a wide strip of gravel so less likely to burn if a grass fire sweeps through.
    bigwheel likes this.

 

 

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