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Hey, Denton, you'll never guess the coincidence I found!

This is a discussion on Hey, Denton, you'll never guess the coincidence I found! within the General Talk forums, part of the General Discussion category; Originally Posted by Slippy I remember a time in my life that cracking open a full strength Budweiser or bottle of Busch beer meant cramming ...

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Thread: Hey, Denton, you'll never guess the coincidence I found!

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slippy View Post
    I remember a time in my life that cracking open a full strength Budweiser or bottle of Busch beer meant cramming a big ole dip of Skoal or Copenhagen prior to the first pull....(Glad I grew out of them Redneck Ways...)
    I know plenty of NE Texas renecks that do that as well as many professional type rednecks. Me? Back when I dipped .... I had to spit like a pusswad, I guess.
    Slippy likes this.
    I will choose to enjoy the journey that God has prepared for me. Hidden Content

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by rice paddy daddy View Post
    I have many, many books on military history. Both hard cover and paper back.
    Been a member of the Military Book Club for over 30 years.
    I read every night, and have 5 or 6 “working “ at any one time.
    I just started “George Washington In The American Revolution 1775-1783”. A hard back I picked up for $1 at our annual county library sale of old books. I actually bought 20 books at the latest sale.
    I used to love our Friends of Library book sale. Would routinely spend >$40 on crappy old books/ month (most of 'em for $1-5 each). And then the FOL decided that they were no longer accepting books over 15 years old. What horseshit is that? Sad.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Tourist View Post
    Wow, how come you're not spearheading your own forum? I never read near that many books, and I took several English courses in college--of course, that was back when students knew how to read English and not just unintelligible misspelled rants.
    I blog about crappy old books sometimes. Does that count?

    Also!!!!! I have a 2-part essay coming out at Survival Blog:

    When the Lights Go Out: The Case for Including Old Books in Your Preps


    &

    The WWWWW & H of Building a Prepper Library of Old Books:
    A Practical Companion to When the Lights Go Out


    It's set to go live 7/23-26.

    I'll post a link when it does. The copyright reverts back to me mid-September.
    Slippy and Prepared One like this.

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  5. #14
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    I actually read a lot and enjoy it. I get it from Dad I suppose. He was always a reader and it rubbed off on me, eventually. His apartment is lined with bookshelves and every shelf is full. He is retired now and he will sit and read for hours and he is a true student of history.

    My study is the same way, books crammed on every shelf. I read mostly Biographical and history, although, I have read most of the classics as well, including Shakespeare, believe it or not.

    Like RPD I have many books on war and the men behind the wars. I just recently finished Mien Kampf ( On my Dad's recommendation ) if that tells you anything. I am a firm believer in learning from history. What's the old saying? If history has proven anything, it's that man does not learn from it. I am inclined to agree in that man does not learn, he merely changes the rules.

    I really wish I had more time to read these days, or watch the Kardashians, I am torn. Alas, work and life seem to get the lions share of my time lately. Ahhhh maybe when I retire.
    Last edited by Prepared One; 07-19-2019 at 05:19 AM.
    " All great things are simple, and many can be expressed in single words: Freedom, Justice, Honor, Duty, Mercy, Hope" .Hidden Content

  6. #15
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    This is one of the reasons I'm working with my doc to find the cause and cure for anxiety. I love to read, but it's hard to concentrate. I was reading one of those Clancy novels, and many times I had to go back over the last paragraph and figure out what I had just read. I read "the words," but they didn't provide any information.

    Between the summer heat and the all-night thunderstorms we're having, my sleep time is simply melting. I'm awake more than I am asleep. I talked to our clinic psychiatry supervisor and they're going to try everything short of shock therapy--and even that's negotiable.
    ...No matter where you are it's enemy territory...

  7. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prepared One View Post
    I actually read a lot and enjoy it. I get it from Dad I suppose. He was always a reader and it rubbed off on me, eventually. His apartment is lined with bookshelves and every shelf is full. He is retired now and he will sit and read for hours and he is a true student of history.

    My study is the same way, books crammed on every shelf. I read mostly Biographical and history, although, I have read most of the classics as well, including Shakespeare, believe it or not.

    Like RPD I have many books on war and the men behind the wars. I just recently finished Mien Kampf ( On my Dad's recommendation ) if that tells you anything. I am a firm believer in learning from history. What's the old saying? If history has proven anything, it's that man does not learn from it. I am inclined to agree in that man does not learn, he merely changes the rules.

    I really wish I had more time to read these days, or watch the Kardashians, I am torn. Alas, work and life seem to get the lions share of my time lately. Ahhhh maybe when I retire.
    Prepared One-- and anyone else who's interested-- let me tell you a little about this thing call DP, Distributed Proofreaders.

    Everyone knows The Gutenberg Project, where pages from crappy old books are scanned and publicly available at places such as Archive.org. The goal, though, is to take these scanned pages and convert them to digitized pages (e-books). That's done using Optical Character Recognition, OCR, software. 0e8 is fal1ible. See what I mean?

    DP is a network of volunteers who proofread, format, and post-process scanned images.

    At the entry-level, Proofreading 1 (P1), a volunteer compares the scanned image with the OCR output. Keep in mind that these are all books out of copyright-- so 1923 and earlier. It's fascinating history for the bibliophile. There are a few rules, tutorials, mentors to help you get started. What you do is correct the OCR output to match the original scan.

    Remember, it's all volunteer. The "projects" are individual books, and you can pick and choose among various levels of difficulties, and types-- literatures, the different sciences, fictions, military, cookbooks, etc.-- there's even a sub-culture of people who like to work on Nancy Drew spin-off books!

    It's an amazing operation. I recently worked on a travelouge by Ernie Pyle in the then-new Gatlinburg State Park, before WWII broke out.

    Once a book has been proofed in P1, it goes to P2 (and there are criteria, though not too stringent, about being "promoted" to P2 proofreading), and then P3 and then to the formatting phases.

    Right now, I'm working on a P2 project written by a companion of Lafayette when he re-toured the Southern States in the '80s. Fascinating. And b/c I have a hard core background in science, a P1 project in human physiology. "Cell-juice" cracked me up.

    Point is-- if you love old books, this is a cause worthy of a few hours a week.

    Not gonna be worth crap if the grid goes down, but maybe a few hundred years on, folks-- or the spawn of Area 51-- will be impressed with how much effort we put into to preserving our culture.

    PM me if you want more detail. And FYI-- I found out about DP at the Sunday Morning Book Tread at AoSHQ.
    Prepared One likes this.

  8. #17
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    My wife and I both do Kindle Unlimited. For $10 a month you can read as many books as you want. The only catch is you cant keep them, it's like a library. We're at about 500 books a year between us. About $.20 a book, I would spend more then that on gas to get books.
    Prepare for the worst, Hope for the best
    Worry about the things you can control, Plan for the things you can't

 

 
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