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Help killing roots

This is a discussion on Help killing roots within the General Talk forums, part of the General Discussion category; I am trying to reclaim some land that was allowed to grow wild for a spell. I have an area about 30 feet in diameter ...

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Thread: Help killing roots

  1. #1
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    Help killing roots

    I am trying to reclaim some land that was allowed to grow wild for a spell. I have an area about 30 feet in diameter that was overgrown with forsythia. I cut it all down at ground level and dug out the largest, main root balls. But the existing roots grow everywhere and keep sprouting new growth. I have tried multiple applications of ‘roundup’ to the new shoots but that doesn’t even kill the new shoots much less the roots. Anyone have any ideas about products I could spray to kill off my problem? Also, I don’t want to poison the ground. I plant on reseeding the area with native wildflower seeds. Thanks in advance!
    Slippy likes this.

  2. #2
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    I usually have good luck with roundup (cheaper generic stuff), but sometimes 2-3 applications to get all the roots (poison ivy/oak, buckthorn is worst, multiflora rose, bittersweet, etc)

    Try cutting the stems/shoots then painting the cuts with undiluted glyphosphate/roundup, a cheap paint brush works. When you cut the main stems all the plants energy goes into new shoots so that's when to hit them with herbicides
    bigwheel and inceptor like this.

  3. #3
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    Hope Alfgore got wind of this plot to dump all these carcinigens chemical herbicides onto mother earth. To paraphrase an old Joan Baez jingle from the 60s."Glysopahtes..its in the wheat that the chickens eat..its in my eggs and in my meat. Get in touch with old Howard Garret and see what he says. He handles things the natural way.
    https://www.dirtdoctor.com/

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  5. #4
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    My father-in-law used to pour gasoline on the really stubborn weeds. Heh, I'm sure that's not what you want but it got the job done.

  6. #5
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    I have a good chunk of land I need to manage for invasives. Recently I wrote my own forest management/stewardship plan so I could get tax breaks and USDA funding.

    This won't post well , but here goes.....

    Invasive Species

    There are a number of invasive plants that have footholds on the property (Table XX). The landowner has taken measures in an attempt to keep their expansion from getting out of control.

    Table XX Invasive Species Present on Forested/Nearby Parcels

    Common Name Genus Species Extent of Spread Eradication Measures

    Bayberry Berberis thunbergii Found in both wooded areas and in fields. Mechanical pulling of rooted plants, mowing, and spraying with glyphosphate Eliminate mature shrubs a seed sources

    Burning Bush Euonymus alatus Sparse, found mainly in wooded areas but spreading via avian seed depositions Mechanical pulling of rooted plants and cutting of larger plants/trees followed by glyphosphate treatment of sprouts. Eliminate mature shrubs a seed sources

    Common Buckthorn Rhamnus_cathartica Problematic on field margins and some establishment’s within wooded areas. No extensive thickets. Mowing with rotary cutter and cutting of larger plants followed by glyphosphate treatment of sprouts. Eliminate mature shrubs as seed sources

    Garlic Mustard Alliaria petiolata Widespread in fields and adjacent wooded parcels Mowing and pulling of plants in spring before flowering/seeding. Biennial, kill all 2 year old plants before seed set

    Honeysuckle Lonicera japonica Found in wooded areas and within uncut areas of fields. No thickets Mowing in open areas and cutting larger shrubs. Glyphosphate treatment to kill roots of sprouts

    Mulitiflora Rose Rosa multiflora Sporadically distributed with several expanding patches Cutting/mowing followed by glyphoshate treatment Eliminate mature plants as seed sources


    Oriental Bittersweet
    Celastrus orbiculatus Widespread in both fields and wooded areas. Several major thickets. Mechanical pulling of rooted plants, mowing in open areas, and glyphosphate treatment of sprouts and large patches. Eliminate mature vines as seed sources


    Three other plants should also be mentioned although they are native, Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia), Poison Ivy (Rhus radicans) and Poison Sumac (Rhus radicans). Both the Creeper and the Ivy are prolific and spread rapidly. They have been managed with glyphosphate to control their spread, and for the latter to also eliminate toxic plant species. These two plants are found sporadically and presumably spread by avian droppings. Poison Sumac is found only sparsely along the swampy western margins of the property and has been carefully treated with glyphosphate in dry conditions to avoid any possible runoff.
    There has been an ongoing battle with invasive plants by the owner for many years now. Major efforts have been taken not to allow major footholds to become established. This has been by mowing/cutting, pulling of rootstocks, and where these efforts are ineffective by the use of glyphosphate spraying. These methods have been found to be effective if applied with diligence particularly to eliminate seed sources of the prolific plants.
    Overall future invasive control will rely primarily by mechanical means where possible to avoid conflicts with herbicides and organic farming practices. Glyphosphate will the herbicide primarily to be used when mechanical means are impractical and/or ineffective. It is the best combination of, being fairly benign, not persistent in the environment, and not overly regulated for homeowner use. If more potent herbicides are found to be needed trichlor may also be used. Perhaps the most important thing is to be vigilent and to eradicate the first few scouts that become seeded before they can spread
    Annie and Slippy like this.

  7. #6
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    Pretty sure old Doc Dirt would reacommend spraying the fresly cut shoots with horticultural grade vinegar. You can also put an empty can upside down over the pesky root and the lack of light will eventually kill it. Thats what he recommened for me to get rid of holly bushes coming up on the far side of the house. It woked. Heres a link for the strong vinegar.
    Vinegar Weed Killer vs Roundup
    Last edited by bigwheel; 05-10-2019 at 11:19 AM.

  8. #7
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    This has some good references:
    Attached Files Attached Files

  9. #8
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    Triclopyr. The Agway guy said to add a couple splashes of this into the “roundup” and it will “napalm” those roots. So I’ll try it and report back the results.
    inceptor likes this.

  10. #9
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    Glyphosate has worked well for me and other than Kudzu, (https://www.smithsonianmag.com/scien...uth-180956325/) which most of you Northerners will never have to deal with, glyphosate in high concentration works on killing the roots of everything.

    (Disclaimer; I don't have any Kudzu on the land at Slippy Lodge but if I did I suspect that glyphosate should work! Its just a Southern myth that you cannot kill Kudzu...)
    Last edited by Slippy; 05-10-2019 at 01:26 PM.
    inceptor likes this.

  11. #10
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    You can also park a few goats nearby and they will just eat it all.
    Hemi45 likes this.

 

 
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