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Suggestions for 5 Gallon Water Containers for Long-Term Storage

This is a discussion on Suggestions for 5 Gallon Water Containers for Long-Term Storage within the General Prepper and Survival Talk forums, part of the Survivalist, Prepper, Bushcrafter, Forest Rangers category; Distillers are much cheaper, the only issue is to move any volume, you need a good bit of heat. So I'm looking at solar, using ...

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Thread: Suggestions for 5 Gallon Water Containers for Long-Term Storage

  1. #41
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    Distillers are much cheaper, the only issue is to move any volume, you need a good bit of heat. So I'm looking at solar, using the plans from sailing the farm, but it's very slow.
    stowlin and bigwheel like this.

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Operator6 View Post
    Check these out.

    Ukiah Trans55

    You could drop a pump into that container and connect a hose to your house pipes. Looks like it would work.
    Operator,

    I love the product concept, execution, and the price isn't terrible. But shipping is to my zip code is 133% of the cost (price: $150; shipping:$199). That's a little steep.

    I have however been looking at the 65 gallon tank below from Tractor Supply (there's one down the road a couple of miles from me...). Its a better size and shape for the space I have. But I'm not sure if it's food grade. And it is also a touch pricey compared to buying 13 x 5 gallon containers.

    Leg Style Storage Tank, 65 gal. - For Life Out Here

    Thanks for the help and keep the suggestions coming!

    ScientistPrepper

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScientistPrepper View Post
    Operator,

    I love the product concept, execution, and the price isn't terrible. But shipping is to my zip code is 133% of the cost (price: $150; shipping:$199). That's a little steep.

    I have however been looking at the 65 gallon tank below from Tractor Supply (there's one down the road a couple of miles from me...). Its a better size and shape for the space I have. But I'm not sure if it's food grade. And it is also a touch pricey compared to buying 13 x 5 gallon containers.

    Leg Style Storage Tank, 65 gal. - For Life Out Here

    Thanks for the help and keep the suggestions coming!

    ScientistPrepper
    If the 5 gal containers are the most economical option then that's what I'd use. That way not all your eggs are in one basket. Develop a leak and maybe you just lose one 5 gal container vs a leak in a 50 gal container.

    We have a lot of ship building and boat building here so potable tanks are available here without shipping. I like the idea of connecting it to your house pipes so no one is carrying water.

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  5. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScientistPrepper View Post
    What section at Walmart did you find those? I can't remember seeing them in my local "supercenter"...
    In my Walmart they are in the camping section. Like I said in my other post Walmart.com has these on sale for $25.97. Ship to store for free. Also check on Craigslist for food grade containers. I assume you are in Florida because you mentioned your concern for Zika. I did a search for some Florida cities and found 4 1/4 gallon buckets Plastic Buckets w. Lids I know you said you didn't want anything large but sometimes you have to adapt and overcome and settle for what you can get. Here is listing for 60 gallon barrels for $35. Food-Grade Plastic Rain Barrels Do you have a garage? Put one barrel in there until you can get better. Here is another listing for 5 gallon buckets for $2. or 3.00 food grade 5 gallon buckets

    Now if you have a truck, then I especially recommend that you get a tote. 275 gallon IBC totes. 55 gallon Food grade barrels. I assume you are on city water. Once that stops you can put the tote in the back of your truck and go to a lake or river and pump water. Here are a couple of examples of the 12v water pumps:

    Simer 12 Volt Self-Priming Utility Pump — 450 GPH, 3/4in. Ports, Model# BW85P | 12 Volt Pumps| Northern Tool + Equipment

    Ironton 12 Volt Transfer Pump with Suction Attachment — 264 GPH, 3/4in. Ports | 12 Volt Pumps| Northern Tool + Equipment

    https://www.amazon.com/HydraPump-Min...ose+connectors

    Wayne 12-Volt Transfer Pump-PC1 - The Home Depot

    I bought mine at Tractor supply or Family Farm and Home, don't remember anymore. Good luck.
    A prudent man foresees evil and hides himself, But the simple pass on and are punished. Proverbs 22:3 NKJV

  6. #45
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    If I understood you correct your solution is temporary? You mentioned a rain collection system in 24 months or less with roof repairs? Is that correct? Also weight was an issue with five gallons a lot easier then 55's. Why not just one gallon containers as mentioned some tea, even one gallon water bottles I've seen under a dollar. That's a lot easier to carry individually especially if there are kids. If my recollection on your earlier post is right you could save money for your rain / roof system and have some stored water now.

    Quote Originally Posted by ScientistPrepper View Post
    Operator,

    I love the product concept, execution, and the price isn't terrible. But shipping is to my zip code is 133% of the cost (price: $150; shipping:$199). That's a little steep.

    I have however been looking at the 65 gallon tank below from Tractor Supply (there's one down the road a couple of miles from me...). Its a better size and shape for the space I have. But I'm not sure if it's food grade. And it is also a touch pricey compared to buying 13 x 5 gallon containers.

    Leg Style Storage Tank, 65 gal. - For Life Out Here

    Thanks for the help and keep the suggestions coming!

    ScientistPrepper

  7. #46
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    Feb 2014
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    Quote Originally Posted by stowlin View Post
    Distillers I thought were much less. I'd have had a hard buying what came with the boat as I believe they run 4-5k new. The katadyn hand held we bought second hand and was still $400. It's manual and produces just barely enough drinking water for two and takes a good deal of time.
    Here is another thought.

    The food grade barrels I can get for $20 can be the bung type or the lid type. The lid type would be easier to clean, and also could be fitted with
    Berkey /Doulton Ceramic Gravity Water Filters on the bottom, draining into a second drum, with tap on the bottom, using food grade tygon tubing. I can get the filters for $20/each.

    If you used 8 of these filters you would get a whole lot of flow and a system with about 100-gal capacity (clean and dirty barrels). Cost would be $200 for the barrels and filters, a little more for the tubing and a tap. Add in 8 more spare filters and you are just getting to the cost of the used katadyn. These filters can also be fitted to 5-gal buckets for a portable system.

    These filters will not remove viruses, but they are silver impregnated so they are bacteriostatic. This is a nice feature for a longterm setup. Since they are ceramic they can also be cleaned repeatedly with a scotchbrite pad. The carbon core also reduces organics.

    Another option is the Sawyer Point 0.02 micron purifier/filter. Does viruses, and 170-gal/day flow. You can get it as a kit with faucet and bucket adapters for $90. This will not reduce organics

    https://sawyer.com/products/sawyer-p...-assembly-kit/

    A great setup would be the Berkefeld Ceramic candles that will remove bacteria, sediment, and reduce organics, and be bacteriostatic. Then the sawyer Point 0.02 purifier to ensure no viruses. This could be 5-gal buckets, or 55-gal drums. A two bucket system with four berkefeld filters and the Sawyer would be less than $200.


    Concerning the Berkefeld Ceramic candles:

    British Berkefeld® Water Filters Elements
    Sterasyl™ Ceramic Water Filter Element


    The Sterasyl™ grade ceramic is designed to remove suspended solids and pathogenic bacteria.

    Composition of the Sterasyl™ ceramic contains pure silver. This silver is a specially formulated self-sterilizing (bacteriostatic) agent. The result is that bacterial growth is prevented from occurring within the Sterasyl™ ceramic element. More importantly, bacterial 'grow-through' is inhibited. Because of the silver, Sterasyl™ filter elements do not require sterilization after cleaning.

    The Sterasyl™ ceramic is the ceramic used for the Super Sterasyl™ filter element. Accordingly, this filter element will have, at a minimum, the filtration benefits of Sterasyl™.

    Toxicological extraction is commonly the most difficult area of the NSF testing standards to satisfy. This shows that the filter does not re-contaminate the water. Many other ceramics have not passed and may not be capable of passing the NSF material extraction test. The Ceramic shell of our Super Sterasyl˙ element is an NSF Listed Component and is manufactured to meet NSF standard 42 for materials.

    Super Sterasyl™ Candle Water Filter Element
    This cleanable filter element is designed to reduce suspended solids, pathogenic bacteria, organic chemicals, and improve taste and odor. The filter elements are produced using the latest ceramic techniques to provide a hollow porous ceramic which is fired at a temperature in excess of 1000C. They are designed to operate with water flow going from the outside to inside of the element. The ceramic shell exhibits a strictly controlled pore structure, so as to provide efficient sub-micron filtration, a proven defense against hard shelled parasites such as Cryptosporidium, as well as removing other less harmful, but equally unpleasant particulate debris, such as rust and dirt. The bore of the filter candle contains granular activated carbon that aids in the reduction of chlorine, reduces organic chemicals and improves the color, taste, and odor of the source water. The Sterasyl™ element has a unique domed ceiling assuring that leakage cannot occur as may happen with capped filters.

    Maximum working pressure 125 psig
    Maximum working temperature 100 F
    Minimum working temperature 40 F

    Contaminant Reduction and Removal
    Pathogenic bacteria
    Cholera, Typhoid, Salmonella, Serratia, E.Coli, Fecal Coliform > 99.99% removal

    Cysts
    Cryptosporidium Parvum and Giardia Lamblia - >99.99% removal (based on tests by Arizona State University)

    Sediment
    Down to 0.9 micron, 100%; 0.5 - 0.8 micron with a filter efficiency of > 99.99% (based on tests by Spectrum Laboratories, Minneapolis, MN)

    Organic Chemicals
    Pesticides, herbicides, organic solvents, trihalomethanes

    Other Chemicals: Chlorine

    Bacterial mitosis and 'grow-through'
    Mitosis is the name for the usual method of bacterial cell division. This division is characterized by resolving the chromatin of the cell nucleus into a threadlike form that condenses into chromosomes, each of which separates longitudinally into two parts, one part of each chromosome being retained in each of the two new daughter cells.

    When conditions of growth (cell division) are right (proper environmental conditions, temperature, pressure, etc.) and sufficient nutrients, the 'threadlike forms' can penetrate the ceramic structure of other ceramic shells and create bacterial cells on the inside of the element.

    Sterasyl™ grade filter elements incorporate silver into the porous ceramic shell to inhibit the occurrenceof 'grow-through'.

  8. #47
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    Oct 2014
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    7,613
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve40th View Post
    I like the stackables. If I use tap water, is there a recommended treatment to use for storing it for a year, per sey?
    I assume you mean treated, city water. You don't need to treat that any further for 1 year of storage, it's fine.

    What I did was fill my stackables with tap water and about an ounce of un-perfumed 5% chlorine bleach and let them sit overnight. That way I checked for leaks and sterilized them. Then I dumped them and just filled with tap water. That little bit of chlorine left in them was just a safety factor.
    A Watchman and Steve40th like this.

 

 
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