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What Was Your Prep Of The Day:

This is a discussion on What Was Your Prep Of The Day: within the General Prepper and Survival Talk forums, part of the Survivalist, Prepper, Bushcrafter, Forest Rangers category; Getting closer to my water storage goal. Need four more gallons. Extra canned goods put back too....

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Thread: What Was Your Prep Of The Day:

  1. #2311
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    Getting closer to my water storage goal. Need four more gallons. Extra canned goods put back too.

  2. #2312
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaulS View Post
    Be careful with the large dandelion leaves. they contain high levels of latex and can make you very sick. Harvest only new leaves for salads and such. The flowers are good for cooking or fermenting and the root is good as a potato substitute or ground into flour and used to thicken sauces. The stems and fully mature leaves are no good for food but you can compost them or feed them to the chickens.
    I rember hearing somewhere that the roots were used in a tea or stew as a cure for stomach problems and indigestion
    SquirrelBait likes this.

  3. #2313
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    So this weekend was AWESOME! I have almost completed my chicken coop for my 7 current chickens, I finished my rainwater catchment system, and I got a bunch of firewood from a lady that is moving across the street.

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  5. #2314
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ianmando View Post
    I rember hearing somewhere that the roots were used in a tea or stew as a cure for stomach problems and indigestion
    The dandelion root is also used as a coffee replacement.

  6. #2315
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    Bought 2 cases of bottled water and some reloading supplies

  7. #2316
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    Oh, and ordered a 12ga reloading kit.

  8. #2317
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    CT, choking on the gun laws.
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    This is what I've stocked it with so far:
    Camelback knockoff (water) 2L.
    TP
    pkg beef jerky
    Firesteel
    Buck 110 knife
    compass
    duct tape
    work gloves
    medic gloves
    paracord 2X50ft
    hand warmers
    Instant taters
    mechanical pencil & refills
    notepad

    Still to add:
    fishing kit
    maps
    coffee(!)
    first aid supplies
    radio

    Unfortunately, it's already pretty packed. I want to weigh it, and get a feel for it on my back.

    TJC

  9. #2318
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaulS View Post
    Be careful with the large dandelion leaves. they contain high levels of latex and can make you very sick. Harvest only new leaves for salads and such. The flowers are good for cooking or fermenting and the root is good as a potato substitute or ground into flour and used to thicken sauces. The stems and fully mature leaves are no good for food but you can compost them or feed them to the chickens.
    You'd have to eat a whole lot for the latex to be an issue. Latex is a laxative in large amounts, but you'd have to eat a ton of dandylions. I am eating quite a bit an I don't have the runs at all, so even the laxative effect isn't in effect from it.

    Not sure how large you are talking like 2,3, 4 feet long?

    More info on the adverse health effects. I've only seen good things on the health effects of dandylion even large leaves a foot high etc..

    They have both been great if you prepare them.

    After drying them they don't even taste bitter/acrid as they do raw.

    Where are you getting the no good for food part, makes no sense at all.

    Did you read this somewhere or do you know what you are talking about?

    Here is the nutritional information I've found

    "Fresh dandelion greens, flower tops, and roots contain valuable constituents that are known to have anti-oxidant, disease preventing, and health promoting properties.

    Fresh leaves are very low in calories; providing just 45 calories per 100 g. It is also good source of dietary fiber (provide about 9% of RDA per 100 g). In addition, its latex is a good laxative. These active principles in the herb help reduce weight and control cholesterol levels in the blood.

    Dandelion root as well as other plant parts contains bitter crystalline compounds Taraxacin, and an acrid resin, Taraxacerin. Further, the root also contains inulin (not insulin) and levulin. Together, these compounds are responsible for various therapeutic properties of the herb.

    Fresh dandelion herb provides 10161 IU of vitamin-A per 100 g, about 338% of daily-recommended intake, one of the highest source of vitamin-A among culinary herbs. Vitamin A is an important fat-soluble vitamin and anti-oxidant, required for maintaining healthy mucus membranes and skin and vision.

    Its leaves are packed with numerous health benefiting flavonoids such as carotene-β, carotene-α, lutein, crypto-xanthin and zea-xanthn. Consumption of natural foods rich in vitamin-A and flavonoids (carotenes) helps body protect from lung and oral cavity cancers. Zeaxanthin has photo-filtering functions and protects retina from UV rays.

    The herb is good source of minerals like potassium, calcium, manganese, iron, and magnesium. Potassium is an important component of cell and body fluids, which helps regulate heart rate and blood pressure. Iron is essential for red blood cell production. Manganese is used by the body as a co-factor for the antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase.

    It is also rich in many vital vitamins including folic acid, riboflavin, pyridoxine, niacin, vitamin -E and vitamin-C that are essential for optimum health. Vitamin-C is a powerful natural antioxidant. Dandelion greens provide 58% of daily-recommended levels of vitamin-C.

    Dandelion is probably the richest herbal sources of vitamin K; provides about 650% of DRI. Vitamin-K has potential role in bone mass building by promoting osteotrophic activity in the bones. It also has established role in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease patients by limiting neuronal damage in the brain.

    Dandelion herb contains notable nutrients and is a great source of nutrition during winter
    This humble backyard herb provides (%of RDA/100g)-
    9% of dietary fiber,
    19% of vitamin B-6 (pyridoxine),
    20% of Riboflavin,
    58% of vitamin C,
    338% of vitamin A,
    649% of vitamin K,
    39% of iron and
    19% of calcium.
    (Note: RDA-Recommended daily allowance)"

    No good for food. Every part of the dandylion is very edible and has a variety of ways to use, I've had absolutely no adverse health effects from Dandylion, I have no idea where you get the no good for food part, makes no sense at all.




    -------

    I worked on drying out dandylion have my front deck full and two secondary drying areas for the crisp dried

    I bagged about two grocery bags of dried dandylion today should last me a couple weeks atleast. I should have a large supply within a week or so. Other stuff is growing quite well this year.

    Use a culligan water bottle to start making dandylion wine. It will probably take me 4 or 5 hours to fill the bottle up with enough petals, already fermenting it a bit. I have two wine bottles also filled from yesterday. I did two bottles last year. This is my first attempt filling an entire keg sized bottle.


    the Latex i plants is edible, note also that Aloe has latex in it, but aloe juice is incredibly healthy. (also a laxative though) Vitamin C in large amounts is the laxative (a laxative) You can do more than DRI however if you take a lot it is laxative.

    Note though that if you also dry wheat grass out and make sure each section is no longer than an inch it will dramatically increase your fibre levels.


    http://www.botanical-online.com/engl...n_toxicity.htm


    Also before you read too much into this realize that rhubarb is 40% oxolate, and dandylion is dramatically less issued.

    Note that oxolate content can be reduced by boiling, fermeting or other processes.

    I dry and boil almost all my dandylion, or at minimum boil, as I usually add it into rice dishes, or well bake to a crisp in place of oil when baking breaks (just coat the top and bottom of the pan bread. instead of burning or overcooking the top of the break the dandylion (raw) cooks and crisps dramatically reducing overbowing, or over toasting (burning breaks that are cooking over flame.

    Some ain't gonna kill you, if I'm not dying from it, no way will you consume enough to kill you.


    A 2005 study found that boiling reduced the level of oxalic acid in food. In a test of foods high in oxalic acid, researchers found that boiling spinach reduces oxalic acid by 87 percent whereas steaming reduces it by 42 percent. In every vegetable studied, boiling is more effective than steaming. And there is a good reason: oxalic acid simply falls off of the food and into the water. You can then remove the oxalic acid by pitching the cooking water.

    Based on this research, the best cooking strategy is to boil (or at least steam) the food and discard the cooking water. I know that all our mothers saved this liquid for soup or gravy, but you’ll want to toss the water of heavy offenders.

    A more effective strategy is to ferment foods high in oxalates. This is my favorite strategy of course because you maintain the enzymes in the raw food, add beneficial bacteria to your diet, and increase the B vitamin content as I describe above. Boiling or steaming will also cause some mineral loss in the food.

    In a 2005 study in Food Microbiology, researchers found that the soluble iron in the homemade vegetable juice in the study increased sixteen times with fermentation. What this means is that if you juice your own vegetable juice with a high iron vegetable like spinach and you ferment it, your body may absorb sixteen times more iron than it would have absorbed had you consumed the juice right out of the juicer.

    The same study found that fermenting commercial juice increased the solubility of iron by seven times. So you can also buy a ready-to-drink juice and ferment it and digest about seven times the iron in the original juice.

    Note I can't find my wine yeast at the moment so I'm fermenting with only baker's yeast I have.
    Last edited by Will2; 06-09-2014 at 04:16 PM.

  10. #2319
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    Hanging wild crafted catnip. It's the beginning of catnip season.

  11. #2320
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    Did some pistol shooting yesterday. Had some friends over who had never shot a firearm before. Had a safety briefing, some basic training on sight picture, grip, stance and trigger squeeze. They did quite well. In fact the wife was ear to ear grinning. Looks like they will be picking up some pistols.

 

 

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