Converting your lawn to a garden
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Converting your lawn to a garden

This is a discussion on Converting your lawn to a garden within the General Prepper and Survival Talk forums, part of the Survivalist, Prepper, Bushcrafter, Forest Rangers category; Recently Iíve seen two posts where people plan on converting their lawns into garden areas. Please be advised that this idea may not turn out ...

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Thread: Converting your lawn to a garden

  1. #1
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    Converting your lawn to a garden

    Recently Iíve seen two posts where people plan on converting their lawns into garden areas. Please be advised that this idea may not turn out as productive as you wish. Iíve tried this where I tilled the lawn and only added some all purpose fertilizer. My harvest results were pretty bad. To get a good productive garden your soil needs to be such that it will give good support to vegetables, not grass. At the least i would send off some soil samples for testing to see what amendments and fertilizers you would need. Maybe try a small garden in a corner to see how it goes. At least then you would have some idea what you could expect from your prospective garden. Another concern is animal pests. Your lawn may be beautiful but a vegetable garden can attract deer and raccoons that can destroy your hard work in a night or two. Best to do a trial run before your life depends on it.
    Annie and NMPRN like this.

  2. #2
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    I've also seen it said that if your lawn won't support earthworms, it won't support much else.
    If you can't find earthworms in your soil, you need to remedy the ratios before ever trying to start growing food.
    Chiefster23 likes this.
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  3. #3
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    You're right - it's not easy to convert lawn into a garden. Big part of the effort I think needs to go into composting to establish that base. My problem is not only the lawn has eaten up all the nutrients from the soil, but also the trees that I have planted for privacy have pulled nutrients out. Experimenting over couple years I think I got to the point that I know how much compost and water needs to go in in order to start and then later support a garden.

    All in all - if you need to, you'll grow a garden on a rocky soil
    Chiefster23 likes this.

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  5. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chiefster23 View Post
    Recently I’ve seen two posts where people plan on converting their lawns into garden areas. Please be advised that this idea may not turn out as productive as you wish. I’ve tried this where I tilled the lawn and only added some all purpose fertilizer. My harvest results were pretty bad. To get a good productive garden your soil needs to be such that it will give good support to vegetables, not grass. At the least i would send off some soil samples for testing to see what amendments and fertilizers you would need. Maybe try a small garden in a corner to see how it goes. At least then you would have some idea what you could expect from your prospective garden. Another concern is animal pests. Your lawn may be beautiful but a vegetable garden can attract deer and raccoons that can destroy your hard work in a night or two. Best to do a trial run before your life depends on it.
    Contact the Ag University in PA. Most of them will do a soil analysis and tell you what to do to improve the soil for your desired crop.
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  6. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pir8fan View Post
    Contact the Ag University in PA. Most of them will do a soil analysis and tell you what to do to improve the soil for your desired crop.
    Yep. I send my samples off to the Penn State extension.
    Pir8fan likes this.

  7. #6
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    Food forest it, baby.


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    I'm one of those brown thumb guys who plans on tilling up the lawn. We've got a few raised beds now that have good soil and do great. The two biggest problems we have are rabbits and Bermuda grass. We defeated the rabbits with chicken wire and I can scale that up to the whole yard pretty easy. The Bermuda grass is a different story. We fight it like crazy as long as we can but it eventually takes over and chokes out the garden. No matter how I improve the soil the Bermuda is going to be a problem. Maybe if our lives depended on the garden we'd invest the time and energy to keep it under control.


    Getting the soil analyzed will be easy enough, my wife works at the State Ag College and several members of our 'network' are farmers. It's the Bermuda that has me worried. ...I'd hate to think that after stockpiling guns and ammo for years I get my arse kicked in the zombie apocalypse by grass.
    Annie likes this.

  9. #8
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    The title preview really let me down here... I really thought the title was going to be "Converting Your Lawnmower into a Tank". I would have been all-in on that topic for some DIY tutorials.
    Annie, Chiefster23 and Slippy like this.
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  10. #9
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    My front lawn is already a vegetable garden, Yum, Yum!
    Chiefster23 likes this.
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  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chiefster23 View Post
    Recently Iíve seen two posts where people plan on converting their lawns into garden areas. Please be advised that this idea may not turn out as productive as you wish. Iíve tried this where I tilled the lawn and only added some all purpose fertilizer. My harvest results were pretty bad. To get a good productive garden your soil needs to be such that it will give good support to vegetables, not grass.
    I'm curious as to why this would be? I could understand it if you treat your lawn with tons of chemicals, pre-emergent, post-emergent, weed killers, other grass killers so that you have only one variety growing, etc. My front yard, which is a couple of acres, is treated just like my pastures... I don't do anything to it. I have all sorts of weeds & several varieties of grass. To make it look nice ( to me), as opposed to chemicals, I just cut it twice a week. I have put in a few small plots of veggies out front, and mine have done just fine... but granted, not as fine as my garden where to soil has been amended and is very nice.

    My plan, post SHTF, would be to turn much of my front yard into garden space, like my friend @Slippy .
    Slippy likes this.


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