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Canning question

This is a discussion on Canning question within the General Prepper and Survival Talk forums, part of the Survivalist, Prepper, Bushcrafter, Forest Rangers category; Originally Posted by hawgrider Yup a gauge will get you in trouble especially if not tested at the beginning of each canning season. And a ...

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Thread: Canning question

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by hawgrider View Post
    Yup a gauge will get you in trouble especially if not tested at the beginning of each canning season. And a jiggle 3 or 4 times a minute is ridicules and incorrect.

    This is a reasonable speed for a typical jiggler-

    Thank you....that's what I needed to know.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chiefster23 View Post
    Hawg! Great information but it applies to presto canners. All American canners call for the weight to lift (or jiggle) 1 to 4 times every minute. All American uses a different style of weight that is meant to lift, not rock from side to side.
    And I think those that told me about the 1 to 4 times a minute had All Americans, I have a Presto.......so it's good to know there is more differences between the two canners

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by hawgrider View Post
    In my defense nowhere in the post was an American mentioned I have presto's-





    That style jiggler is nearly identical to USA made Mirromatics, 1-4 jiggles/minute.

    How do you adjust pressure on a Presto jiggler? The American and Mirromatic jigglers have bores for 5- 10- and 15- psi
    Last edited by Mad Trapper; 08-04-2020 at 10:26 PM.

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  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mad Trapper View Post
    That style jiggler is nearly identical to USA made Mirromatics, 1-4 jiggles/minute.

    How do you adjust pressure on a Presto jiggler? The American and Mirromatic jigglers have bores for 5- 10- and 15- psi
    On my Presto, it has separate rings 5 lbs each, plus the jiggler itself is 5 lbs.....so if you need to process something at 5lbs, you only add the jiggler. If you need 10lbs, you add one ring to the jiggler to equal 10 and if you need 15lbs you add the second ring. or better yet, I think they're called weights. Same thing, sort of
    Mad Trapper and hawgrider like this.

  6. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by JustAnotherNut View Post
    I'm definitely not an expert on PC since I've only been doing it for the last year.....but siphoning happens and as you've already found out, it's still ok & good to eat.

    But do NOT tighten the lids more than first resistance, or the jars may explode. As pressure builds and is maintained within the canner, so it is within the jars...it needs an escape. The canner has the pressure valves & whatnot to allow excess pressure to be relieved...jars with tight lids do not

    Also, density of the food can be a problem. Tomatoes aren't all that dense, but I tried applesauce one time and I'll never do that again in a PC. Nearly every jar threw up inside the canner creating a huge mess to clean up.


    My canner has both the gauge and weight jiggler, and was told it should only jiggle about 3 or 4 times a minute but doing that, the pressure only reads around 7 to 8lbs. Getting it to read 10lbs and it jiggles a whole lot more than that. It's something I'm still working on to find that sweet spot for both gauge and weights, I do keep an eye & ear out for both and when it gets within range of 'there', I go by the gauge, regardless of the weights. And this gray area between the two, may have to do with my corn getting flat sour (being processed at too high of temp and/or too long that creates the bacteria that loves and grows in the heat, which is just the opposite of Botulism that is killed off by heat)
    You're not going to create thermophillic bacteria by canning at too high of temperature or too long. Those bacteria live in thermal vents at the bottom of the ocean or in hot springs like Old Faithful at Yellowstone. It might make your corn/vegetables mushy though.

    Using weighted jiggler process times are at 10-psi for elev. < 1000 feet, 15-psi above 1000 feet elev. I can't remember what elev. 15-psi would not be effective/canner to reach 240 oF? It is above 8000 feet

    For some high acid foods/pickeled, it may recommend only using 5-psi. But those foods can be safely canned in a water bath canner

    Don't trust a gauge unless it's calibrated.

    https://nchfp.uga.edu/how/can_home.html

  7. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mad Trapper View Post
    You're not going to create thermophillic bacteria by canning at too high of temperature or too long. Those bacteria live in thermal vents at the bottom of the ocean or in hot springs like Old Faithful at Yellowstone. It might make your corn/vegetables mushy though.

    Using weighted jiggler process times are at 10-psi for elev. < 1000 feet, 15-psi above 1000 feet elev. I can't remember what elev. 15-psi would not be effective/canner to reach 240 oF? It is above 8000 feet

    For some high acid foods/pickeled, it may recommend only using 5-psi. But those foods can be safely canned in a water bath canner

    Don't trust a gauge unless it's calibrated.

    https://nchfp.uga.edu/how/can_home.html

    Well if there's a way for me to create a problem, you can bet I'll find it, usually by accident......but you're right that it isn't done in the canning process itself, but not allowing the jars to cool properly afterward.

    For the last few years when canning corn, it tasted sour....kinda like pickled, and the only thing I put in those jars was corn and water. I don't even add canning salt. So doing some research to find out why that was happening, I found this about flat sour....

    https://www.healthycanning.com/flat-...Arvill%20Wayne.

    Flat sour is an unappealing off-flavour that canned goods, home or commerical, can develop. It was studied as early as 1937 by a researcher named Barlow: “[Barlow] also described several causes of flat sours and recognized that the flat sour may be caused by more than one organism.” [1]
    It is caused by some microorganisms that survive the canning process. They are referred to as thermophilic (aka “heat loving”). The actual bacteria that cause it can include (depending on the food product) strains of Bacillus stearothermophilus, Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus coagulans, Bacillus macerans, and Bacillus subtilis. [2]
    They are harmless with regard to food safety, but they cause the food to ferment in a way that produces a sour off-taste and smell without producing any gas. Metal cans will not bulge, nor will lids pop off of jars as there is no gas to cause that.

    It is described as sour because of the taste and smell, and flat because it doesn’t produce gas that could bulge or blow the lid



    Strangest thing is that I've been canning for around 40 years now and 20 of that in this house....but have only had this problem develop in just the last 5 years and is always with corn.
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  8. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by JustAnotherNut View Post
    Well if there's a way for me to create a problem, you can bet I'll find it, usually by accident......but you're right that it isn't done in the canning process itself, but not allowing the jars to cool properly afterward.

    For the last few years when canning corn, it tasted sour....kinda like pickled, and the only thing I put in those jars was corn and water. I don't even add canning salt. So doing some research to find out why that was happening, I found this about flat sour....

    https://www.healthycanning.com/flat-...Arvill%20Wayne.

    Flat sour is an unappealing off-flavour that canned goods, home or commerical, can develop. It was studied as early as 1937 by a researcher named Barlow: “[Barlow] also described several causes of flat sours and recognized that the flat sour may be caused by more than one organism.” [1]
    It is caused by some microorganisms that survive the canning process. They are referred to as thermophilic (aka “heat loving”). The actual bacteria that cause it can include (depending on the food product) strains of Bacillus stearothermophilus, Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus coagulans, Bacillus macerans, and Bacillus subtilis. [2]
    They are harmless with regard to food safety, but they cause the food to ferment in a way that produces a sour off-taste and smell without producing any gas. Metal cans will not bulge, nor will lids pop off of jars as there is no gas to cause that.

    It is described as sour because of the taste and smell, and flat because it doesn’t produce gas that could bulge or blow the lid



    Strangest thing is that I've been canning for around 40 years now and 20 of that in this house....but have only had this problem develop in just the last 5 years and is always with corn.
    I learned something there.

    Seems the flat sour is due to not cooling the canned material, as soon as possible after pressure is down. And thermophillic bacteria are more widespread than I knew about.

    I've always removed my jars from the canner soon after processing. Perhaps that is why I've not had the problem?
    JustAnotherNut likes this.

  9. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mad Trapper View Post
    I learned something there.

    Seems the flat sour is due to not cooling the canned material, as soon as possible after pressure is down. And thermophillic bacteria are more widespread than I knew about.

    I've always removed my jars from the canner soon after processing. Perhaps that is why I've not had the problem?
    I do too. With the PC, I wait until the gauge is 0 and the little vent doohickey drops and about a minute or so after. Then turn the lid slowly....so it actually takes another minute or two and I do that because it's supposed to help with siphoning.
    I've only had the PC for just over a year. Previously I had only waterbath canned, and still had the problem, but my plan for this year is to do my canning in the fall/winter and in the meantime, stuff is going in the freezer until then.

 

 
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