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Bread making question

This is a discussion on Bread making question within the General Prepper and Survival Talk forums, part of the Survivalist, Prepper, Bushcrafter, Forest Rangers category; SOCOM42 nailed it with - "The gluten is what holds the bread together" I no long can use or even get near gluten but back ...

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Thread: Bread making question

  1. #11
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    SOCOM42 nailed it with - "The gluten is what holds the bread together"

    I no long can use or even get near gluten but back in the day I used to mix in gluten with my various bread
    formulas and it sure seemed to work for me! Good luck!!
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  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kauboy View Post
    Bread makers differ, and can add a good number of variables to the process. I'd find out if your ingredients are good first by doing a loaf by hand. I watched a video where a guy compared breads made from "bread flour" versus "all purpose flour", and his end results were nearly identical. He wanted to see if there was any justification to paying the higher price for bread flour when making basic white bread. He found none.

    I'm a bit unclear on the purpose of sifting flour. The particles are not large enough to remain unsettled and have air pockets between them, and mixing them into a dough will eliminate any "fluff" that may have existed. You would certainly break up any chunks, so maybe there is a benefit as far as that goes.
    I didn't sift the flour in my latest handmade loaves, and they came out great. I can't compare to my breadmaker at the moment, since we've lost the paddle mixer that goes in the bottom.
    This is off-topic a bit, but in regards to sifting. Flour settles, compacts over time, a little each time the container is handled. Take your flour canister/jar and bang the bottom of it flat on the counter a couple times...see how much it settles down in there? If you take your measuring cup & dip compacted flour you'll get more, sometimes a lot more (in weight and therefore quantity) than a recipe calls for. That's why pro bakers always weigh their ingredients. I dont bother with that, and all our bread is made by hand, bowl & spoon, from scratch all the way down. From years of doing this, I can tell when I need to sift some out first.. and then draw from there. Another way is to stir the flour in the canister before you draw from it, and then spooning the flour into your measuring cup to minimize compacting from just scooping deep.
    Last edited by MountainGirl; 03-25-2020 at 11:05 AM.
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  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by MountainGirl View Post
    This is off-topic a bit, but in regards to sifting. Flour settles, compacts over time, a little each time the container is handled. Take your flour canister/jar and bang the bottom of it flat on the counter a couple times...see how much it settles down in there? If you take your measuring cup & dip compacted flour you'll get more, sometimes a lot more (in weight and therefore quantity) than a recipe calls for. That's why pro bakers always weigh their ingredients. I dont bother with that, and all our bread is made by hand, bowl & spoon, from scratch all the way down. From years of doing this, I can tell when I need to sift some out first.. and then draw from there. Another way is to stir the flour in the canister before you draw from it, and then spoon the flour into your measuring cup to minimize compacting from just scooping deep.
    That makes sense, but the advice given was to sift it in order to make a more fluffy bread?
    That doesn't translate for me. Any air introduced from sifting won't mean more air in the dough. Is it just because you're getting a more accurate quantity?
    "Every normal man must be tempted, at times, to spit on his hands, hoist the black flag, and begin slitting throats." - H. L. Mencken

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  5. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kauboy View Post
    That makes sense, but the advice given was to sift it in order to make a more fluffy bread?
    That doesn't translate for me. Any air introduced from sifting won't mean more air in the dough. Is it just because you're getting a more accurate quantity?
    Yep. It's not the 'extra air' that would make it fluffy - it's flour in the wrong proportion to the other ingredients that can make it not.

    The instructions might be assuming your flour is compacted - a common mistake new bakers make.
    And anyone using a machine... is a new baker.
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  6. #15
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    I weigh mine out when not using the machine.

    Mix enough for a dozen loafs then part it out by weight.

    Learned about bread making when a kid helping out in the grandparents restaurant.

    Ran the big hobart mixer, they pulled out the mix, I was too small to do it.

    Use to use a big aluminum scoop to pull the flour out of the bin and on to the scale then into the mixer,

    Yeast was done with a tin measuring cup sized for what was needed.

    I use to watch my father open the cotton cloth flour bags,

    lift and dump the bag into the bins, lift the bag out leaving the flour in place.

    Grandmother and mother made clothing out of the bags, They had a second bin for pastry flour.

    I could not lift the bags, they weighed more that I did, they were 100# bags.

    I vaguely remember weighing out butter for the pastries, it came in 50# tubs and was cut out with a sort of scoop.

    Each one of these operations I was told how much to put out.

    As an aside, I loved the can opener, was mounted to a huge table and had a big crank on top could open any size can.

    I have one for myself today huge with replaceable cutters.
    Last edited by SOCOM42; 03-25-2020 at 11:31 AM.
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  7. #16
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    I haven't read through all the responses, so I do apologize if this is repetitious.

    First, your homemade bread is never going to have the taste or texture of commercial bread. This is a feature, not a bug. Most commercial breads are loaded with dough conditioners and preservatives (i.e. chemicals). Have you ever noticed that modern bread can last in your drawer for weeks without mold growth? Yeah.

    Second, a tablespoon or two of instant dry milk powder can be added to your recipe as a dough conditioner. Also a tablespoon of lemon juice.

    Third, modern recipes aren't written with the assumption that the flour will be sifted. Carefully spoon the flour into your measuring cup and level it off without packing it down. Never scoop your flour out of the bag or canister.

    Fourth, are you using a recipe that was written specifically for your bread machine, or any bread machine, for that matter? If you don't have a recipe specific to your bread machine, try to find a recipe written for a machine with the same capacity as yours.

    Good luck. I used to get excellent results from my bread machine, but I find making it the old fashioned way to be more rewarding.
    Last edited by paulag1955; 03-25-2020 at 11:32 AM.
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  8. #17
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    DON'T PUT YEAST IN YOUR BREAD!!! If that means your bread is flat and heavy and the consistency of a manhole cover, so be it. When the yeast eats the gluten and other sugars, it gives off CO2. The CO2 is what makes your bread rise and get light and fluffy. But the CO2 causes GLOBAL WARMING!!!!!!!!11!!!!!!1!!!!!!!

    If you make bread with yeast you obviously hate brown people and are a racist because when the oceans rise from the GLOBAL WARMING the brown people are not smart enough move inland and they will drown!

    We need to call our congressmen right now and DEMAND they add language to the Coronavirus bill to ban yeast farts!!!
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  9. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chiefster23 View Post
    We tried making bread with one of those automatic bread making machines. We used all purpose flour and the loaf tasted OK but was very heavy and coarse. The bread crumbled easily. Would using bread flour make our home made loaves lighter, more like store bought bread?
    We had several models over the years and had a lot of fun and made good bread and the best flour torts you ever had on the dough setting. Back when we were fooling in it was a lack of gluten in the ap flour that caused issues most especially being crumbly I guess. So then you just buy a jar of gluten and add it to the all purpose flour and viola you got the right stuff. Cheaper than buying the high dollar bread flour. Everybody hates gluten nowadays which dont seem very rational.
    https://www.chowhound.com/post/buy-gluten-powder-875759

  10. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chiefster23 View Post
    We tried making bread with one of those automatic bread making machines. We used all purpose flour and the loaf tasted OK but was very heavy and coarse. The bread crumbled easily. Would using bread flour make our home made loaves lighter, more like store bought bread?
    TRY THIS! I have a breadmaker and we make bread ons a regular basis. I have NEVER used all purpose flour nor bread flower, we have always used .....CAKE FLOUR, its WAYYYYY better than any other flower, its softer and more fluffy and when your done it tastes like home made bread not cake. Yes, I put yeast in it. I have used the recipes in the Russell Hobbs manual untill I got the hang of everything. Since then I have made various flavoured breads too like onion loves, made pizza dough and even made dough for pretzels, all making use of CAKE FLOUR, dont know of you get it where you live, but try its once,you wont look back.

    P.s I agree that you will never get the taste/texture of store bought bread but try this.

    Sent from my SM-J530F using Tapatalk
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  11. #20
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    Yeast farts.... can’t stop laughing at that one.
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