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What's THE most important place to start as a prepper?

This is a discussion on What's THE most important place to start as a prepper? within the General Prepper and Survival Talk forums, part of the Survivalist, Prepper, Bushcrafter, Forest Rangers category; Personal health and education Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk...

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Thread: What's THE most important place to start as a prepper?

  1. #11
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    Personal health and education


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  2. #12
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    Water, first aid, some type of defense, there is not much that needs done that can't be accomplished with a shotgun for under $200. If you are inexperienced hold off on buying the pistol or rifle until you figure out what works for you. Food, and means of preparing, preserving, and storing. I would recommend new shooters look into some type of training like the Appleseed shoots.
    "A man convinced against his will, is of the same opinion still."- The wise words of Benjamin Franklin.

  3. #13
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    water, shelter, food, hygine.

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  5. #14
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    We started with learning to make lists of lists. That is learning to make a high level list of major things we need to figure out how to do and what to have. That list consists of things like "How do we access to water?" "How do we access food?" "How do we provide security?" "What do we need for first aid?" "How do we provide power?"

    That effort initially took about a week to do and the list got to be about 30 items long (far too many).

    Once that was done we took each item and prioritized it. Based on the priority, we drilled down further and created new lists of each major thing that we needed to figure out. As we "finished" each minor list, we went back and revisited the major list and all of the previous minor lists to remove duplication and identify things we had not thought of previously.

    It took a while (several months, but not a year) before we were even able to work out a strategy for our prepping. Only after we identified and thought about the strategy of our prepping, were we ready to even start putting together a shopping list. Otherwise you are just pissing money away on the latest tacticool garbage. We still made a BUNCH of mistakes and continue to make them.

    Your brain is the most important prepping tool you have.
    Prepared One, jimcosta and Marica like this.
    rest in peace Corporal Bradley Coy 06/08/92-10/24/14

  6. #15
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    What's THE most important place to start as a prepper?

    All good ideas so far!

    Start by LEARNING to do things.
    Can you change a tire? Can you walk a few miles if your car breaks down? Can you clear a jam in your semi-auto pistol? Are you ready and able to put an improvised splint on your child if he breaks his leg while you are on a camping/hiking trip? Do you know the basics of water purification? Can you safely operate a chainsaw?

    Then begin acquiring the TOOLS.
    Do you have enough stored water to flush the toilet if the water main breaks or the well pump craps out? Do you have enough food to make it through the blizzard or hurricane if the roads are blocked or impassable? Do you have a way to cook that food? Do you have the right batteries for your flashlights when the power goes out? Or enough lantern oil? Do you have an extra lug wrench when the factory one breaks? Do you have an Emergency Fund of X Dollars to help with an unexpected SHTF situation?

    EXPECT and ANTICIPATE that S will Hit The Fan and know what to do and have what it takes to get it done.

    And finally have enough Serfs to carry your Shit-Filled Buckets from your Shipping Container Compound where you are known simply as "KING".

  7. #16
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    I always suggest starting with the basics for life and events particular to your area. ( Snow, flooding, power outages, tornadoes, hurricanes etc.) Start at 72 hours. then expand concentrically outwards. You will find that the basics will overlap in coverage for the larger events. (Civil war, war, grid down, pandemic, etc.) Take little bites and start at the beginning. Food water, shelter, basic first aid, candles, good flashlights, communications, protection. Start with a plan, then work the plan. If you have the basics covered for 72 hours and have a plan, you are 100% better off then 90% of the sheeple in this country.
    Marica and Go2ndAmend like this.
    " All great things are simple, and many can be expressed in single words: Freedom, Justice, Honor, Duty, Mercy, Hope" .Hidden Content

  8. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ragnarök View Post
    I would start with a primitive camping trip...
    It's a very good idea, but my wife is your quintessential suburban girl. Her idea of "camping" is a the best room in a first-class hotel. I'm not kidding, we went to Sturgis twice, and yes, I spent the nights in a fancy-schmancy hotel!

    Of course, I was younger then, a cold night in a tent amid the partying would have been nice. But if I did it now, I would be the one finding that hotel!
    ...No matter where you are it's enemy territory...

  9. #18
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    Everyone seems to be on point here.

    In that I have been dealing with families face to face for several years, this is what I think I would hear from them.

    The first step is probably the hardest. This is for the initial family member awake to a prepping need openly discussing it with the family.
    This is important because in order to "survive" you have to go deep inside yourself and resolve that your family will survive no matter what it takes.
    And family survival is almost impossible without the family knowing what you are doing and supporting and helping you.

    Prepping is a lonely enough journey with the family. It must be brutal without the family. Therefore, for success, get the family on board.

    The second step is to educate yourself enough to know if you must bug out, know early where you are inclined to go. Most people only have two choices: Wilderness or group retreat elsewhere. This greatly narrows your preparations down, both in time and expense. It is entirely one thing to focus preps on wilderness survival verses going to Uncle Joe's and his extended family.
    Last edited by jimcosta; 06-15-2019 at 07:44 AM.

  10. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimcosta View Post
    It is entirely one thing to focus preps on wilderness survival verses going to Uncle Joe's and his extended family.
    I agree with you 100%.

    If I was to pick a "survival buddy," it would be Annie, for a good reason.

    We are total opposites, and in the survival mode, that's a good thing. I know the stuff she doesn't (although she's a fast study), she knows the stuff I don't. For example, we'll need food in the TEOTWAWKI. No utensil can be thrown away, so where do you find a polisher as the world burns? Annie wouldn't have that problem.

    Also, I watch those cooking vignettes she posts--and you should, too. She seems to be studying that art of making "something out of nothing." This concept will be invaluable when your tummy is empty and marauding hordes keep you on the move.

    Here's an example. Annie just did a vignette on what looked to me as just a "bag of seeds." I read that article, and by golly I learned something.
    ...No matter where you are it's enemy territory...

  11. #20
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    Excellent point Tourist. Early on I made the mistake that I had to learn all there is to know about prepping and tried to. Man, was that a Mistake.

    We each are different personalities with different strengths and weaknesses. I may visualize how to make a bridge but am not designed to cook, provide nursing and health care, or understand guns and such. That is why I chose a group - I'm just too stupid to do it all alone.

    Perhaps this is the third step, to appreciate that you can't learn it all fast enough. You need help to be prepared quickly. Then you can go back and expand your knowledge and skills.
    Last edited by jimcosta; 06-15-2019 at 08:17 AM.

 

 
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