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Growing Rice

This is a discussion on Growing Rice within the Gardening forums, part of the Survival Food Procurement category; I really don't know why, but I've never grown rice before. It is usually an integral component of most prepper's long term food stores... it ...

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Thread: Growing Rice

  1. #1
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    Growing Rice

    I really don't know why, but I've never grown rice before. It is usually an integral component of most prepper's long term food stores... it sure is for me. I like to grow items that could help me become self sufficient during a SHTF crisis, and I don't see why rice shouldn't be near the top of the list. I especially like items that store easily and rice surely does that. So I've ordered some seed and will try it next year.

    I think the main reason I never grew it was because of images in my mind of rice grown in Asia and actually over in Arkansas, with these large perfectly flat fields that need to be flooded. I was considering doing that but as I researched rice, I found out there are two main types. Lowland rice is what I was thinking of, where the rice grows in flooded fields. But I found out there is a type called upland rice, which grows like any normal crop. It does not need flooding but does need an inch of water a week... similar to corn.

    This rice can be grown all over the US, including the far north, such as Maine. There are a bunch of varieties available. I've ordered Loto, which is a risotto type of rice. Has anyone here grown rice?


  2. #2
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    How much space do you have available for growing it?

  3. #3
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    I helped grow rice in Texas with @ Doguets rice fields. Had someone that leased some of their fields and grew organic rice. A great problem down south plants grow well and plant called indigo (yes you can dye stuff with it, it will dye your hands doing this bare handed) love to grow in the water that floods the fields and someone has to get out there and pull them up, which is also great until a root or part of it touches the water and grows back. Trick is to pull them up snap them and lay them back on the rice, you don't do that and it will overtake your field. Also unless you go out there and cut each rice stalk/plant down by hand when it comes to harvesting time more of them will grow back up and get in your rice which isn't a problem until your second harvesting that is used for seeds.

    Pretty simple ordeal plow a field and put up levees to hold in water that follow the contours of the land so it can drain right or flood right, after that floor it to saturate the field for bit then drain it as in no puddles left any puddle will cause the rice seed to boil and kill it then throw your seeds down let them take and germinate then begin flooding it again and let it grow. Towards the end drain the field let it grow all way and dry out the ground get out there and cut it down half way, you sometimes can get a second cutting out of the fields for seed but I wouldn't depend on it 100%.

    Now that you are down south after your second cutting and you got this great field that can hold water it's now time to flood it a 2nd time around October at latest and get you some crawfish traps and put them out with a flat bottom boat. Spend the fall/winter checking them and it's another staple added to your food.
    (Disclaimer I did this from when I was 10 till I was 16 so I might of missed a few details)
    Redneck and OrneryOldBat like this.

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  5. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Weldman View Post
    I helped grow rice in Texas with @ Doguets rice fields. Had someone that leased some of their fields and grew organic rice. A great problem down south plants grow well and plant called indigo (yes you can dye stuff with it, it will dye your hands doing this bare handed) love to grow in the water that floods the fields and someone has to get out there and pull them up, which is also great until a root or part of it touches the water and grows back. Trick is to pull them up snap them and lay them back on the rice, you don't do that and it will overtake your field. Also unless you go out there and cut each rice stalk/plant down by hand when it comes to harvesting time more of them will grow back up and get in your rice which isn't a problem until your second harvesting that is used for seeds.

    Pretty simple ordeal plow a field and put up levees to hold in water that follow the contours of the land so it can drain right or flood right, after that floor it to saturate the field for bit then drain it as in no puddles left any puddle will cause the rice seed to boil and kill it then throw your seeds down let them take and germinate then begin flooding it again and let it grow. Towards the end drain the field let it grow all way and dry out the ground get out there and cut it down half way, you sometimes can get a second cutting out of the fields for seed but I wouldn't depend on it 100%.

    Now that you are down south after your second cutting and you got this great field that can hold water it's now time to flood it a 2nd time around October at latest and get you some crawfish traps and put them out with a flat bottom boat. Spend the fall/winter checking them and it's another staple added to your food.
    (Disclaimer I did this from when I was 10 till I was 16 so I might of missed a few details)
    Point is, the variety I picked doesn't need flooded fields. To me, that is a game changer for growing your own. Wish I knew about upland rice years ago. Better late than never.
    Last edited by Redneck; 12-03-2020 at 11:51 AM.
    Weldman likes this.

  6. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by paulag1955 View Post
    How much space do you have available for growing it?
    I'm just going to grow a small patch as a test... maybe 10x30 feet. If it grows well, which I expect, then I'll save a lot of the seed, in case of a crisis. If it works, I'll treat it like amaranth, where I grow a small patch for my own normal use but each year put up a bunch of seed just in case.

    I keep lots of seed in cool storage, in case of a crisis. If needed, I would plant a large part of my 20 acres in gardens plus would give seed to my neighbors. Some plants fill that bill better than others. Amaranth & collards are two items I stock plenty of seed for me & neighbors, as a pound of seed for both is over 100,000 seeds. Rice could also be something I could give to neighbors as there are over 15,000 seed per pound.
    Last edited by Redneck; 12-03-2020 at 12:04 PM.
    paulag1955 and Michael_Js like this.

  7. #6
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    Rice comes in bags, boxes, and cans . . . and I'm 76 . . . never will eat my share before the boogey man gets me.

    May God bless,
    Dwight
    If you can breathe, . . . thank God.

    If you can read, . . . thank a teacher.

    If you are reading this in English, . . . thank a veteran.

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  8. #7
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    Memories....................
    Mamasan, Babysan, a water buffalo, lots of manual labor.
    @dwight55 remember the contraptions the women would use to transfer water from one paddy to another? Looked like the paddlewheel on a Mississippi River steamer, operated by Babysan sitting on a seat and turning it using her legs like a giant bicycle?

    Harvest time, threshing done by laying the harvested plants on the road and letting the American truck convoys drive over them.

    NVA coming to the villes when we weren't around to take a portion of the harvest as a "tax" for allowing the villagers to stay alive.

    Associated memory for @dwight55 :the smell of nuoc mam being brewed. Current wife bought a bottle home from the oriental market early in our marriage. She learned quickly never to have any of that around.
    Weldman and dwight55 like this.
    "There is nothing so exhilarating as to be shot at without result." Winston Churchill
    "Leave the artillerymen alone, they are an obstinate lot." Napoleon
    Member: VFW, American Legion, Vietnam Veterans of America, Society of the 5th Infantry Division, Sons of the American Revolution.

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by dwight55 View Post
    Rice comes in bags, boxes, and cans . . . and I'm 76 . . . never will eat my share before the boogey man gets me.

    May God bless,
    Dwight
    Several years ago, before retirement, wife had me buy 50 pound sacks of rice at the Vietnamese grocery in Jacksonville. We have hundreds of pounds of Vietnamese and Thai rice stored away. Hundreds upon hundreds of pounds.
    Between that and the Louisiana rice we buy by the 25 pound bag we will never, ever run out.
    dwight55 and Michael_Js like this.
    "There is nothing so exhilarating as to be shot at without result." Winston Churchill
    "Leave the artillerymen alone, they are an obstinate lot." Napoleon
    Member: VFW, American Legion, Vietnam Veterans of America, Society of the 5th Infantry Division, Sons of the American Revolution.

  10. #9
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    Basically there is a line between what you should spend your time on buying or stocking up and what you should spend your time growing or building. A big enough root cellar will help with that line.
    dwight55 and Michael_Js like this.

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by rice paddy daddy View Post
    Memories....................
    Mamasan, Babysan, a water buffalo, lots of manual labor.
    @dwight55 remember the contraptions the women would use to transfer water from one paddy to another? Looked like the paddlewheel on a Mississippi River steamer, operated by Babysan sitting on a seat and turning it using her legs like a giant bicycle?

    Harvest time, threshing done by laying the harvested plants on the road and letting the American truck convoys drive over them.

    NVA coming to the villes when we weren't around to take a portion of the harvest as a "tax" for allowing the villagers to stay alive.

    Associated memory for @dwight55 :the smell of nuoc mam being brewed. Current wife bought a bottle home from the oriental market early in our marriage. She learned quickly never to have any of that around.
    You were doing great with the memories until that last paragraph . . . it ought to be illegal to posess that stuff anywhere off the antarctic continent.

    May God bless,
    Dwight
    rice paddy daddy likes this.
    If you can breathe, . . . thank God.

    If you can read, . . . thank a teacher.

    If you are reading this in English, . . . thank a veteran.

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