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Got seeds? Get seeds NOW

This is a discussion on Got seeds? Get seeds NOW within the Gardening forums, part of the Survival Food Procurement category; Considering this years run on all things to survive and seed houses hopping to keep up with overwhelming orders and shortages because of it........this is ...

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Thread: Got seeds? Get seeds NOW

  1. #1
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    Got seeds? Get seeds NOW

    Considering this years run on all things to survive and seed houses hopping to keep up with overwhelming orders and shortages because of it........this is a good time to get seeds for next year. While some things are still out of stock, if you shop around now, you can find what you need.

    Heirlooms are great for seed saving and carrying on the history of that variety. Open pollinated varieties are also great for growing & seed saving and are not as picky to conditions as heirlooms.


    IF you must use hybrids, just know you can't save & regrow the seeds in future because they don't breed true......so you would have to buy plenty of seed for several years seasons.


    Most seeds are good for 2 to 3 years for many crops, and even longer for others. By 'good', I mean germination rates....first couple of years you should get 90% or better germination, and every year after that number drops.......with the possible exception of parsnips that are only good for 1 to 2 years max, from what I've read.


    And while you're at it shopping for vegetables, don't forget herbs and flowers that are bee friendly for pollinating the food crops. Bee balm, Comfrey, Borage, Sunflowers, Cosmos, Echinacea, clovers & the like are all great bee attractants. Marigolds may not be for the bees, but it does deter many pests when planted throughout the garden.


    There are many online seed options available, and I just put in an order to fill out my supply and went with Everwilde Farms. Their packaging is resealable mylar.
    Denton, Michael_Js, Slippy and 2 others like this.

  2. #2
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    I have been buying seeds for weeks. Panic buying if I'm honest. I have enough for my own use for several years with no seed saving, of for a coupe of years for myself and my closest neighbors.

  3. #3
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    Yep loaded up in the spring been collecting packs all summer. Currently drying some basil and tomato seeds from this years crop. Stupid question. How does anyone out there harvest romaine lettuce and arugula seeds? It's been a long week and I don't have the energy to google it.

    Godspeed.
    JustAnotherNut and Slippy like this.

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  5. #4
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    Yea, I've been waiting to restock my seeds for next year until the weather got cooler to help assure any seeds I bought were fresh. It's getting about time.
    I don't always use heirloom seeds in the garden but I do try to add a f ew heirloom seed packs to the preps most years.
    I planted the cool weather plants a few weeks ago.
    Slippy likes this.

  6. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by CapitalKane49p View Post
    Yep loaded up in the spring been collecting packs all summer. Currently drying some basil and tomato seeds from this years crop. Stupid question. How does anyone out there harvest romaine lettuce and arugula seeds? It's been a long week and I don't have the energy to google it.

    Godspeed.
    Honestly, I'm not sure. I don't grow arugula, but have tried with romaine. To me, it looks similar to a dandelion flower & little puff balls. Maybe you're supposed to save the puff balls???? IDK, let me check

    Yep, save those puff balls, but here's more detail...

    https://gardenerthumb.com/how-to-sav...e...%20More%20
    CapitalKane49p and Michael_Js like this.

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elvis View Post
    Yea, I've been waiting to restock my seeds for next year until the weather got cooler to help assure any seeds I bought were fresh. It's getting about time.
    I don't always use heirloom seeds in the garden but I do try to add a f ew heirloom seed packs to the preps most years.
    I planted the cool weather plants a few weeks ago.
    Heirlooms can be picky about growing conditions, pests, disease, etc and can take alot of TLC, to get a good harvest. In many cases, it may be easier to go with 'open pollinated'
    Michael_Js likes this.

  8. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by JustAnotherNut View Post
    Honestly, I'm not sure. I don't grow arugula, but have tried with romaine. To me, it looks similar to a dandelion flower & little puff balls. Maybe you're supposed to save the puff balls???? IDK, let me check

    Yep, save those puff balls, but here's more detail...

    https://gardenerthumb.com/how-to-sav...e...%20More%20
    Lettuce seed is easy to save. Let some of your early planted lettuce go to seed. You'll see many little yellow flowers that will form a compound infloresence. As the individual flowers mature will form into small brown seed pods that contain parachute seeds. They do not all mature at the same time, so it is best to wait until most are mature before harvesting the stalk.

    I wait until the stalk starts to die off and some mature seeds begin to be dispersed, then cut off the stalks and hang them to dry in a warm dry place. Once well dried you can winnow the seeds from the stalks onto a piece of news paper. I don't bother separating all the chaff. I transfer the seeds into mini ziplock bags for storage. Lettuce seed stores well and will be viable for several years. The seeds from two or three plants will number in the thousands.

    I need to inventory all my seeds to see what I have left. I keep a running inventory each year on a computer file, then update and print out a revised file. Always good to have a hard copy

    I'll be saving some seeds from this years crops that do not cross pollinate easily. Some I have in hand already, some of my heirloom kale seed has been planted into a fall crop. Seeds I'm saving this year include beans, tomatoes, peppers, kale, lettuce, spinach, dill, parsley.

  9. #8
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    I’ve already purchased enough seeds to replant all my normal garden varieties for next year. But my gardens are not all that big. I have a nagging feeling that I should be purchasing more for ‘just in case’. But in order to plant more I would need to construct more garden and fence it since I have a horrible deer problem. In addition, the possible garden expansion area has poor ground so we’re talking heavy prep work and supplements and/or constructing raised beds. I’m not sure I want to invest all that $ and effort right now. I’m leaning towards just sticking with what I have for right now and hoping for the best. Maybe just buy some extra seed for now and see what happens next spring.
    Michael_Js likes this.

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chiefster23 View Post
    I’ve already purchased enough seeds to replant all my normal garden varieties for next year. But my gardens are not all that big. I have a nagging feeling that I should be purchasing more for ‘just in case’. But in order to plant more I would need to construct more garden and fence it since I have a horrible deer problem. In addition, the possible garden expansion area has poor ground so we’re talking heavy prep work and supplements and/or constructing raised beds. I’m not sure I want to invest all that $ and effort right now. I’m leaning towards just sticking with what I have for right now and hoping for the best. Maybe just buy some extra seed for now and see what happens next spring.
    I mean...I have at least 10 times as many of most seeds than I need for my garden. They're not expensive and don't take up a lot of space. It can't hurt to have extra on hand.

  11. #10
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    Please...you also need to think about what you'll need to be growing if food isn't readily available in the supermarket. Lettuce is tasty and you may like salads, but how much garden space can you spare for such a low calorie food? If your garden space is unlimited, you may be able to grow as much lettuce as you want, but if your garden space is limited, you may need to sacrifice lettuce space to grow a calorie dense food. (Not intending to pick on lettuce, I'm just using it as an example of a food that's the opposite of calorie dense.)

    Calorie dense foods for survival gardening: Potatoes, Sweet Potatoes, Corn, Shelling Beans, Amaranth, Wheat. Lower calorie crops that will promote fat storage (desirable if food is in short supply): Beets, carrots, carrots, peas, melons.

    These aren't exhaustive lists, just examples to get you started.

 

 
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