Apples and Pomegranates
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Apples and Pomegranates

This is a discussion on Apples and Pomegranates within the Gardening forums, part of the Survival Food Procurement category; Thinking my pomegranates are pretty close to being ready. Anyone have any tips? As for the apples I'm guessing in the fall they'll be GTG? ...

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  • 5 Post By Sasquatch
  • 1 Post By paulag1955
  • 3 Post By Mad Trapper
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  • 4 Post By Redneck
  • 3 Post By Sasquatch

Thread: Apples and Pomegranates

  1. #1
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    Apples and Pomegranates

    Thinking my pomegranates are pretty close to being ready. Anyone have any tips?

    As for the apples I'm guessing in the fall they'll be GTG?



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  2. #2
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    What variety are your apples?
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    Never seen/eaten a pomegranate. I don't suspect they'd like our winters. What are they like to eat? Pies, storage?

    Unless your apples are a variety that stays green when ripe, they will turn color and get sweeter as they ripen. Some apples are early, some ripen late. It's nice to have a few of each to spread out the harvest time. Yours look healthy without insect damage.

    You can also graft scions of different varieties on the same tree, then it will produce several types of apples. I'm not sure if this overcomes the need for cross pollination?

    I wish my grandfather was still alive, he had a pretty big orchard and grafted lots of his trees. Even put good apples on wild rootstocks. He passed before I was old enough to learn the details of what he did.

    On a side note, we had late frosts but the apple crop is great and the peaches are doing well too. I've got to work on my cider press!
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    The pomegranates look ready.

    The pomegranate juice is pretty good although it is a serious pain in the ass to get. Out of about 25 pomegranates last fall we maybe got 2 quarts of juice. But it is pretty strong tasting. You could easily water it down 2:1 and still have a lot of flavor.

    If you try to make jelly from it, be warned it has almost no natural pectin in it. So basically any jelly recipe you use, double the pectin in the recipe and you might have enough. We did not, so our pomegranate jelly is more like pomegranate syrup, which doesn't suck... But just be aware.
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    No way for anyone to say when your apples will ripen. Depends on the variety but even then, climate impacts when they are ready. The same variety planted in Mississippi will ripen at a totally different time than that variety grown in Michigan.

    Beautiful looking apples. With our heat & humidity, mine rarely look that nice. Plus I spray as little as possible.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mad Trapper View Post
    I've got to work on my cider press!
    This is my rack & cloth press we built at work. Is very heavy but is on wheels. The cheese form & the collection pan were fabricated at a metal shop in Memphis. I've yet to use my press. Gonna have to wait for me to retire in a couple of years.





    For those folks that don't understand small cider production, this pic shows someone creating the cheeses. The cloth goes inside the frame, it is filled with crushed apples, and then you repeat.



    Then you normally use a hydraulic jack, or similar to squeeze the stack of cheeses.

    Last edited by Redneck; 08-02-2020 at 07:11 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by paulag1955 View Post
    What variety are your apples?
    I can't remember what the former owner said they were. He did say they were the best tasting apples he'd ever had. So far he's been right with all the other fruit we've gotten. I'll have to text him and ask him what kind they are again.

    I should probably pay more attention when people are talking to me....oh look, a squirrel.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sasquatch View Post
    I can't remember what the former owner said they were. He did say they were the best tasting apples he'd ever had. So far he's been right with all the other fruit we've gotten. I'll have to text him and ask him what kind they are again.

    I should probably pay more attention when people are talking to me....oh look, a squirrel.
    Squirrels can be a major apple pest.

    Being squirrels, they are not happy with one or two apples, but will keep coming back after squirreling away what they have stolen.

    I find it's worst when it's very dry weather as they seem to use the fruit as a source of water. Even unripe fruit is targeted. My trees are adjacent to forest so no shortage of squirrels.

    That said, if they become a problem they are good quartered, and fried. Sort of like rabbit, but more squirrels for a meal

    https://practicalselfreliance.com/squirrel-recipes/

    P.S. Sas, you being in Commiefornia I'd get a good air rifle, if they have not banned those yet
    Last edited by Mad Trapper; 08-03-2020 at 05:50 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mad Trapper View Post
    Squirrels can be a major apple pest.

    Being squirrels, they are not happy with one or two apples, but will keep coming back after squirreling away what they have stolen.

    I find it's worst when it's very dry weather as they seem to use the fruit as a source of water. Even unripe fruit is targeted. My trees are adjacent to forest so no shortage of squirrels.

    That said, if they become a problem they are good quartered, and fried. Sort of like rabbit, but more squirrels for a meal

    https://practicalselfreliance.com/squirrel-recipes/

    P.S. Sas, you being in Commiefornia I'd get a good air rifle, if they have not banned those yet
    Ya know what's weird, I dont have any squirrels around my house. We have every other varmint you can think of but I've never seen a squirrel. Hell, I even have those at my work in the city.

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