Long term storage of white Rice
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Long term storage of white Rice

This is a discussion on Long term storage of white Rice within the Garden, Canning, Long Term Food Storage forums, part of the Survival Food Procurement category; Hi everyone, new to site from Australia We have been storing food items for a cpl of yrs now, have used Mylar Bags etc for ...

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Thread: Long term storage of white Rice

  1. #1
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    Long term storage of white Rice

    Hi everyone, new to site from Australia
    We have been storing food items for a cpl of yrs now, have used Mylar Bags etc for Oats, Wheat and other items.
    What I am researching is White rice, we are running out of room here, have a large shed out the back, but it gets very hot in our Summers, sometimes over 45 deg Celsius, not often but it does happen, and when it gets cold the temp drops to around 5 degrees in the shed and colder sometimes. Would storing Rice in a food grade drum, they are 200 lt drums with screw on and sealed lids, be ok?, don't want to lose the Rice
    Any advice would of course be appreciated
    Kind regards
    Warren

  2. #2
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    temperature swing will certainly kill the longevity of the storage - looking at 110 degrees F down to 13 degrees or so .... I'd be looking to examine your overall supply storage and do an exchange - substitute supplies that aren't temp sensitive and could be protected against other possible damages .... food should be your last resort ....
    Daddy O likes this.
    I llini WarriorHidden Content

  3. #3
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    How about burying it? Temp swings are moderated, security is increased.
    Slippy's-Attorney likes this.

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  5. #4
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    dig a hole under the shed...
    -IN OMNIA PARATUS

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    Daddy O likes this.
    Taking your guns is like eating a whale,,,,,,One bite at a time

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    Quote Originally Posted by Illini Warrior View Post
    temperature swing will certainly kill the longevity of the storage - looking at 110 degrees F down to 13 degrees or so .... I'd be looking to examine your overall supply storage and do an exchange - substitute supplies that aren't temp sensitive and could be protected against other possible damages .... food should be your last resort ....
    Thanks for the info, was concerned about it, won't be storing in the shed

  8. #7
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    Would do that, but digging is out for me, two lumbar fusions kind of reduces my abilities, a lot lol
    Mat get some smaller drums and take my time, thanks for the input

  9. #8
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    Haven't tried canning yet, heat would still effect cans though, we have a lot of cans inside stored
    Appreciate the idea
    Thanks

  10. #9
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    Temperature swings, by themselves, are not as damaging until you factor in water and oxygen content. If moisture was reduced to near zero, and no oxygen was present at all, the temperature changes would have less effect on longevity. However, when moisture exists and heat is applied, you get humidity. Humidity and oxygen lead to quick bacterial growth.
    You could use a half-year(spring->summer or summer->fall for adequate temp changes) long experiment to prove it out. Get two equal size containers that are air tight, and two mylar pouches. Fill each with an equal amount of rice. Add O2 absorbers and silicate packs to both pouches before pushing out the air and sealing. Keep one tucked in a closet somewhere out of the way, and the other in the shed. If you packed them well, the mylar should shrink down a bit to show that the O2 has been absorbed. Check on them every 2 months or so, and look for changes in the pouches(no need to open). If they start to show signs of puffing/inflation, then you have bacterial growth.
    After 6 months, you should have enough to make a decision on which is the best long term option.
    "Every normal man must be tempted, at times, to spit on his hands, hoist the black flag, and begin slitting throats." - H. L. Mencken

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kauboy View Post
    Temperature swings, by themselves, are not as damaging until you factor in water and oxygen content. If moisture was reduced to near zero, and no oxygen was present at all, the temperature changes would have less effect on longevity. However, when moisture exists and heat is applied, you get humidity. Humidity and oxygen lead to quick bacterial growth.
    You could use a half-year(spring->summer or summer->fall for adequate temp changes) long experiment to prove it out. Get two equal size containers that are air tight, and two mylar pouches. Fill each with an equal amount of rice. Add O2 absorbers and silicate packs to both pouches before pushing out the air and sealing. Keep one tucked in a closet somewhere out of the way, and the other in the shed. If you packed them well, the mylar should shrink down a bit to show that the O2 has been absorbed. Check on them every 2 months or so, and look for changes in the pouches(no need to open). If they start to show signs of puffing/inflation, then you have bacterial growth.
    After 6 months, you should have enough to make a decision on which is the best long term option.
    Excellent, thanks for that, we (Son and I) are about to get some more 20kg buckets (food grade) will put two aside for this, as Winter is close here, it would be a good time to try it out, the shed gets a bit of condensation, but not bad. Was thinking that the silos here have no protection on the Wheat belt and it is ok, always has bugs though, impossible to stop moths sadly, we are at War at the moment, bought some San Remo powdered mashed spuds, and four were not sealed properly, seeing if that is where they came from. Other than that we are in the process of going though everything to see where the infestation started, will be freezing all powders from now on for a few days before putting into Mylar
    Have a great day

 

 

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