Dry pinto beans for LTS must be 3% or less moisture content- how can i tell
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Dry pinto beans for LTS must be 3% or less moisture content- how can i tell

This is a discussion on Dry pinto beans for LTS must be 3% or less moisture content- how can i tell within the Garden, Canning, Long Term Food Storage forums, part of the Survival Food Procurement category; Hi folks: This is my first post & I'm hoping I'll get some good answers from the members. I just bought 4X 50lb bags of ...

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Thread: Dry pinto beans for LTS must be 3% or less moisture content- how can i tell

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    Dry pinto beans for LTS must be 3% or less moisture content- how can i tell

    Hi folks:

    This is my first post & I'm hoping I'll get some good answers from the members. I just bought 4X 50lb bags of pinto beans. I have a large Excaliber dehydrator and wish to dry them enough for LTS. I'll be using mylar bags, oxygen absorbers and my vacumm sealer. I put up hundreds of pounds of beans, rice, oatmeal,onions and other things in 2011. I bought this food from a Mormon food bank. Their requirements from their suppliers is a moisture content of no more than 3% for LTS. The beans I just bought aren't dry enough for LTS. I'm going to use my Excaliber dehydrator but how can I tell when they are dry enough to bag up for LTS? I called Adobe Milling in Colorado who buys all kinds of beans from a multitudes of farmers. I bought their beans they shipped to Virginia and they told me their beans veried in moisture content with 9% not uncommon. What's the secdret to get the moisture right on intos before LTS.
    Thanks in advance to all who can help with your posts.

    cato47

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    You can complete the drying of them.

    I don't know if a dehydrator will do the job or not, may need a basket arrangement in something like an AA canner.

    Look on Ebay, there are meters for measuring the moisture content.

    Look here;

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/AMTAST-Smar...cAAOSwkfRePniT

    Just a starting point for you.
    Last edited by SOCOM42; 05-09-2020 at 09:18 PM.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by cato47 View Post
    Hi folks:

    This is my first post & I'm hoping I'll get some good answers from the members. I just bought 4X 50lb bags of pinto beans. I have a large Excaliber dehydrator and wish to dry them enough for LTS. I'll be using mylar bags, oxygen absorbers and my vacumm sealer. I put up hundreds of pounds of beans, rice, oatmeal,onions and other things in 2011. I bought this food from a Mormon food bank. Their requirements from their suppliers is a moisture content of no more than 3% for LTS. The beans I just bought aren't dry enough for LTS. I'm going to use my Excaliber dehydrator but how can I tell when they are dry enough to bag up for LTS? I called Adobe Milling in Colorado who buys all kinds of beans from a multitudes of farmers. I bought their beans they shipped to Virginia and they told me their beans veried in moisture content with 9% not uncommon. What's the secdret to get the moisture right on intos before LTS.
    Thanks in advance to all who can help with your posts.

    cato47
    Dry beans and rice are good as they are and will store for 25 years. Most of mine are stored in the bags/containers they came in. I have some in mylar bags simply because I separated some down to 2 person meals. No measuring just put them in the pan.
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    Soco:

    I went to your ebay link. Neat little devive but it costs more than the beans I'm wanting to mylar up. There must be some down home way to safely come to an accurate conclusion. I heard a few years ago...take a few beans,lay them on concrete and whack them with a hammer. If they crush into a powdery substance they are dry enough for LTS. If they just smash flat, they are too moist. I need a definitive answer so as not to do all the work for nothing if I get it wrong.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cato47 View Post
    Soco:

    I went to your ebay link. Neat little devive but it costs more than the beans I'm wanting to mylar up. There must be some down home way to safely come to an accurate conclusion. I heard a few years ago...take a few beans,lay them on concrete and whack them with a hammer. If they crush into a powdery substance they are dry enough for LTS. If they just smash flat, they are too moist. I need a definitive answer so as not to do all the work for nothing if I get it wrong.
    Are you talking about uncooked or cooked beans? If it's uncooked you can do a google search to confirm what I told you. There are a lot of sites out there on how long things will store for a variety of products.

    ETA: If you intend to check moisture content on most things then you'll need a moisture meter and they aren't cheap.
    Last edited by inceptor; 05-09-2020 at 09:49 PM. Reason: added content
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    Put some of the beans in a pan and weigh them. Then put them in an oven at ~275oF overnight. Weigh them again, if they lost more than 3% they were not dry enough
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mad Trapper View Post
    Put some of the beans in a pan and weigh them. Then put them in an oven at ~275oF overnight. Weigh them again, if they lost more than 3% they were not dry enough
    Mad Trapper:
    Where did you come up with this idea, especially the 275 degrees for 8 hours. That sounds to hot for too long a period of time to me. Did you read this somewhere or is this a shot in the dark? I need an answer that is proven not only to work, but one that won't kill the beans of their nutrients etc.

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    @cato47 , @Mad Trapper is right on weighing out a sample and oven processing, but I would use 130-140 F for it.

    Get a Ohaus triple beam scale or a balance beam powder scale for the weighing, I hate electronic scales.

    The triple beam gives you a larger sample range.
    Last edited by SOCOM42; 05-10-2020 at 07:20 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by SOCOM42 View Post
    @cato47 , @Mad Trapper is right on weighing out a sample and oven processing, but I would use 130-140 F for it.

    Get a Ohaus triple beam scale or a balance beam powder scale for the weighing, I hate electronic scales.

    The triple beam gives you a larger sample range.
    As a side note, if they are too dry, after a few years in storage they will not rehydrate.

    If you run into this problem, running them through a pressure cooker may help, if not:

    The only option then will be to grind them into a flour for processing in such as a filler in breadstuffs, ect.
    Last edited by SOCOM42; 05-10-2020 at 07:26 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by SOCOM42 View Post
    @cato47 , @Mad Trapper is right on weighing out a sample and oven processing, but I would use 130-140 F for it.

    Get a Ohaus triple beam scale or a balance beam powder scale for the weighing, I hate electronic scales.

    The triple beam gives you a larger sample range.
    @SOCOM42 is right on with scales.

    Mechanical beam balances are the way to go, no need to have electric or batteries, easy to tell if something is wrong or fix. Those used for chemistry or reloading are best. Need a scale for the weight range you want to weigh. Also get a set of calibration weights for precise/accurate work. A cheap ballpark weight is a nickel, 4.985 grams if I remember correctly.

    Also there is a learning curve for weighing things correctly..............

 

 
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