WW2 Rationing Food Experiment (British)
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WW2 Rationing Food Experiment (British)

This is a discussion on WW2 Rationing Food Experiment (British) within the Food, Health and Fitness Survival forums, part of the Survivalist, Prepper, Bushcrafter, Forest Rangers category; An interesting info I stumbled on google. How much food was rationed by the government per family in 1940. The blogger had used wartime rationing ...

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  1. #1
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    WW2 Rationing Food Experiment (British)

    An interesting info I stumbled on google. How much food was rationed by the government per family in 1940.
    The blogger had used wartime rationing as a diet to lose weight.
    Some recipes are included.


    THE 1940's EXPERIMENT
    RATIONING IN BRITAIN


    When rationing was introduced in England on January 8, 1940 (incidentally that is my birthday…the January 8 bit NOT the 1940!!) it was to ensure that food was distributed fairly and that the dwindling food supplies lasted. However, rationing did vary slightly month to month depending on the availability of foods increasing when it was plentiful and decreasing when it was in short supply.
    https://the1940sexperiment.com/rationing-diet-sheets/



    Today, what kind of supplies do relief-givers give disaster areas in places like USA and Canada? Is it conducted in an orderly way and distributed fairly, or is it like what we see in the movies with relief givers throwing food items, and people scrambling to get them?

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    In many ways, rationing came to be seen as one of Britain's wartime triumphs.

    Nobody starved - in fact, since everyone was forced to eat a low-fat diet and plenty of vegetables, the nation actually became healthier than before. But coping with such a restricted diet added an extra level of grimness to the war years.


    When rationing began on 8 January 1940, bacon and ham were initially limited to 4oz a week, sugar to a more generous 12oz and butter to 4oz.

    Meat was later rationed by price rather than weight, so if you bought cheaper cuts, you could have more of them.

    The allowance was one shilling and ten pence (1/10d) at first, which could buy you almost 3lb of beef, pork or mutton, but that went down to ½d in 1941. Cooking fats were rationed in July 1940, as was tea (2oz), while preserves and cheese were added to the list of rationed goods the following year.

    'People didn't go hungry, but the diet was relentlessly dull,' says James Taylor, a historian at London's Imperial War Museum, where a Ministry of Food exhibition is on until next January. 'They did it, though, because they realised it was for a higher cause.'

    Even onions were all but impossible to find - a single specimen was raffled for an appropriately eye-watering £4 in London during 1941.


    A shortage of ingredients was not the only difficulty faced by the domestic cook. Much of the day could be spent joining one queue after another, outside the butcher, the baker, the greengrocer... and this was an almost daily occurrence, since households were without fridges or freezers.
    Read more: We'll eat again! How the housewives on the Kitchen Front kept a hungry nation fed on nothing but rations | Daily Mail Online
    Last edited by charito; 10-10-2017 at 04:26 AM.

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    War time scones recipes.


    Talk about celebrity chefs - Marguerite Patten was a celebrity chef as early as World War II. During the war, Marguerite worked for the British Ministry of Food, where her job was to teach housewives how to making good meals despite rationing. In 1944, she began working on a radio program for the BBC called Kitchen Front. To date, Marguerite has written over 170 cookbooks, has been honored by the Queen and, at 95 years of age, she is still (relatively) going strong.
    https://thechildrenswar.blogspot.ca/...f-recipes.html

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    Food was a weapon in World War 1. The USA didn't use rationing but citizens were encouraged to forego certain ingredients to save them for European allies and American soldiers.


    Herbert Hoover’s new Food Administration, meanwhile, issued guidelines and announced themed days of the week: Mondays were meatless, Wednesdays wheatless… Certain foods, like sugar, wheat, meats, and fats, were urgently needed for the front and for Allied civilian populations. “It became evident that food was going to be a weapon in the war,” says Helen Veit, an interviewee in The Great War and a leading food historian. “Hebert Hoover immediately worked to get Americans to think that saving food and conserving food was the most important thing that they could do as individuals.”
    Victory Recipes of the Great War | American Experience | Official Site | PBS

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    ECONOMY LOAF, from the Modern Hostess Cookbook:

    6 tablespoons vitaminized margarine

    1/2 cup dry bread crumbs

    1 cup cooked fresh or canned peas

    1 cup mashed potatoes

    1/4 teaspoon salt

    1/8 teaspoon pepper

    1/8 teaspoon nutmeg

    2 tablespoons flour

    1/2 cup milk

    2 hard-cooked eggs

    1 can condensed tomato soup

    Additional seasonings

    Melt 2 tablespoons of the margarine, add crumbs, brown slightly, stirring constantly. Sprinkle half the crumbs on the bottom and sides of a well greased oblong loaf pan (approximately 8 1/2 x 4 1/2 x 2 3/4 inches).
    Mash peas through a sieve, add mashed potatoes, remaining crumbs and seasonings.
    Make white sauce by melting 2 tablespoons of the margarine, adding flour, then the milk — cooking until smooth and thickened. Add white sauce to potato mixture, blend together thoroughly.
    Place half of this mixture in crumb lined loaf pan.
    Top with slices of hard-cooked egg; add remaining potato mixture.
    Bake in moderate oven (350°F) 25 minutes or until set. Unmold, garnish with additional egg slices, or with broiled bacon, if desired.
    Serve with tomato sauce made by heating the soup with the remaining 2 tablespoons margarine, adding a pinch of herbs and a little Worchestershire or A-1 Sauce, to taste.
    World War II Recipes: Victory Cake and Economy Loaf | Time.com

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    rationing in England didn't stop at the war's end - food rationing on certain items ran all the way into the 1950s ....
    I llini WarriorHidden Content

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    Quote Originally Posted by charito View Post
    Food was a weapon in World War 1. The USA didn't use rationing but citizens were encouraged to forego certain ingredients to save them for European allies and American soldiers.



    Victory Recipes of the Great War | American Experience | Official Site | PBS
    Herbert Hoover was selected to run Red Cross food to the starving Belgians. The food by arrangement went to feed the Germany Army. A Red Cross nurse was executed for squealing on this by the Germans(espionage). The banking intresests were making money on both sides. Paul Warburg ran and was a key founder of the federal reserve bank. A born German, his brother held the same capacity with the Kaiser. As his reward for a job well done for keeping Germany in the war an extra two years, banking instrests ensured Hoover's election as President of the United States. Of course the banks that owned the Federal Reserve could do what they wanted and we got the Great Depression.
    Last edited by Camel923; 10-10-2017 at 06:24 AM.
    Blessed be God, my rock who trains my hands for battle, my fingers for war. Psalms 144:1

    Victory can depend on a dog or a goose---Napoleon

 

 

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