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What is your timeline for storage?

This is a discussion on What is your timeline for storage? within the Food, Health and Fitness Survival forums, part of the Survivalist, Prepper, Bushcrafter, Forest Rangers category; Originally Posted by JustAnotherNut Any chance you can find a spot inside your house for a few plant pots, that you can grow some fresh ...

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Thread: What is your timeline for storage?

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by JustAnotherNut View Post
    Any chance you can find a spot inside your house for a few plant pots, that you can grow some fresh veggies?

    Also, if you have a garden growing now.....as you harvest from it and pull the plants, you can still prep the bed and replant for a fall harvest. Those cool weather veggies, like some lettuces, spinach, cabbage, broccoli, carrots, etc that can handle some light frosts can even survive a freeze or two if you protect it somehow......either a cold/hot frame of some sort, or some kind of row cover, or even extra mulch. Doubtful it will protect all winter, but can sure extend the growing season
    I have tried sucession planting before with very poor sucess. I have been freezing and canning my garden prduction so I have some veggies put back already with more on the way. Tomatoes are just starting to ripen so they will be next on the canning schedule.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chiefster23 View Post
    I have tried sucession planting before with very poor sucess. I have been freezing and canning my garden prduction so I have some veggies put back already with more on the way. Tomatoes are just starting to ripen so they will be next on the canning schedule.
    I truly wish I was better at growing things. If I have to depend on a garden when all this shit hits the big fan blades I am a dead man. I have peppers this year but my tomatoes never took off. Really, I am the type who kills fake plants.
    " All great things are simple, and many can be expressed in single words: Freedom, Justice, Honor, Duty, Mercy, Hope" .Hidden Content

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prepared One View Post
    I truly wish I was better at growing things. If I have to depend on a garden when all this shit hits the big fan blades I am a dead man. I have peppers this year but my tomatoes never took off. Really, I am the type who kills fake plants.
    So if by some miracle of miracles, you managed a huge bumper crop of something.......how would you preserve it for later? Freeze? Dehydrate? Can it?

    I ask for two reasons....1.) Ya just never know, you might get a crop and 2.) You could always hit the local produce stands that may sell by the box full, then take it home & preserve it like you would if you had grown it yourself (but didn't) just to add some extra cushion to your supplies.

    Got dirt? Plant some radishes to start, only takes about 28 days to harvest and both bulb and leaves are edible. Either eat as is, or in a salad or even cooked. I've not tried cooked radishes before, but I've seen recipes for them. Does your soil have compost or enough organic matter to feed the soil that feeds the plants? What type of soil? Sand, hard clay? What about PH levels...is it too acidic(sour) or too alkaline(sweet)? Do you water too much or not enough?

    Yes lots of questions, but trying to help ya out
    Prepared One likes this.

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  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by JustAnotherNut View Post
    So if by some miracle of miracles, you managed a huge bumper crop of something.......how would you preserve it for later? Freeze? Dehydrate? Can it?
    That is why my go to crop for an extended crisis is the three sisters garden. All three sisters, field corn, pole beans & winter squash can easily be stored without any special tools. The corn is left to dry on the stalks and is then stored in corn cribs. The beans likewise dry on the corn stalks and just need to be gathered. The winter squash, with its hard skin (rind) will last many months.

    When in doubt, do as folks did many years past.
    JustAnotherNut and beaujames7 like this.

  6. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by JustAnotherNut View Post
    So if by some miracle of miracles, you managed a huge bumper crop of something.......how would you preserve it for later? Freeze? Dehydrate? Can it?

    I ask for two reasons....1.) Ya just never know, you might get a crop and 2.) You could always hit the local produce stands that may sell by the box full, then take it home & preserve it like you would if you had grown it yourself (but didn't) just to add some extra cushion to your supplies.

    Got dirt? Plant some radishes to start, only takes about 28 days to harvest and both bulb and leaves are edible. Either eat as is, or in a salad or even cooked. I've not tried cooked radishes before, but I've seen recipes for them. Does your soil have compost or enough organic matter to feed the soil that feeds the plants? What type of soil? Sand, hard clay? What about PH levels...is it too acidic(sour) or too alkaline(sweet)? Do you water too much or not enough?

    Yes lots of questions, but trying to help ya out
    Well, I don't have a lot of ground to work with really. Most of my back yard is pool and deck. Got a small strip of dirt I plant tomatoes and peppers in back of the garage. (When I bought the house some 20 years ago gardening was not high on the list) Never been much for gardening anyways. Wife liked to garden a bit but not overly so. As well, she was the caner in the family. So, for now I will make do with my storage and supplement where I can. I appreciate the input and always read with interest how people do their planting.
    JustAnotherNut likes this.
    " All great things are simple, and many can be expressed in single words: Freedom, Justice, Honor, Duty, Mercy, Hope" .Hidden Content

  7. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by JustAnotherNut View Post
    Just how long are you preparing for? 6 months? 1 year? 5 or 10 years?

    My goal has always been to have enough food & supplies put up to last about a year and the ability to provide more for longer.....as with my chickens & garden.

    BUT is that really enough? Simple answer is probably not and it would actually depend on many outside influences as to how long we'd need to survive from our stores. But what kind of timeline do you expect your stores to last or that you would need it???
    Approximately 6 months.
    JustAnotherNut likes this.

  8. #27
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    Keep in mind that you need to consider "calories per day" when determining how much food you actually have. Assuming not working too hard the average person will require at least 2000 calories per day. Men closer to 2300, women about 1800 calories per day for moderate work. Working hard outside I burn about 2600 calories a day. A fireman fighting wildfires all day will burn about 3500 calories. My wife working at the office burns about 1400 calories a day.
    MOST prepared long term storage food kits barely provide 1200 calories per day, During WW2 1100 calories a day was considered starvation level feeding for prisoners sitting most of the day and a slow death for those who worked. Legacy Foods does provide the minimum required 2000 calories per day, Wise and Mountain House do not.

    2000 calories per day. Check your stored food and do the math.
    A #10 can of white rice (about 6 1/2 lbs) is 15,000 calories or about 7 days of food.
    A #10 can of dehydrated green beans is about 1800 calories or about 1 day of food.

    Everybody's budget is different but none of us are professional organic farmers, especially with limited fuel supplies. Since the 1st years crop may not do so well I think having at least 18 months at 2000 calories per day of food on hand would be the goal. That way if your 1st year growing food fails you've got a second growing year to figure out how to farm. So for me the goal is 18 months at 2000+ calories per day. We're not there yet.

    While I'd like to I can't afford enough food to feed the few neighbors I have. Plus there are all sorts of problems with trying to feed others. But at the same time I understand that without a few more people living here I can't realistically defend the property that I would hope to grow food on. We have a few family members who probably would join us (yes, I've discussed this with them) and put up a bit for them but probably will never have enough to have 2000 calories per day for 18 months for everybody.
    Redneck likes this.

  9. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elvis View Post

    Everybody's budget is different but none of us are professional organic farmers, especially with limited fuel supplies. Since the 1st years crop may not do so well I think having at least 18 months at 2000 calories per day of food on hand would be the goal. That way if your 1st year growing food fails you've got a second growing year to figure out how to farm. So for me the goal is 18 months at 2000+ calories per day. We're not there yet.
    Sounds logical. I used the calorie count to determine how much long term stores I would need per person. As I added more & more food into storage, I would tell myself I just provided for another person. Maybe it was a mind game but it broke up the process into manageable steps.

    However I feel one can work to ensure the 1st year crop does well. That is why every year I try different crops and techniques. For example, my three sisters garden didn't work well as I tried using rows of corn, but spaced wider than normal. Even with the extra spacing, the pole beans & winter squash didn't get enough light and those plants suffered for it. So I learned, the tried & true methods the native Americans used are best. Lots of small, round food plots where all plants get equal sunlight works best. I have tested amaranth for several years and now feel 100% confident anyone can grow that crop and can produce huge yields of nutritious food.

    Also keep in mind, that first year, if living a rural life like me, one could expect to harvest a fair amount of wild game. That will certainly add to the calorie count. I can likewise add to the calorie count by sharing resources with my neighbors with cattle herds. But then there are things rural preppers can do now to provide a steady supply of calories each & every year. One of which is by planting & maintaining orchards, berry patches, grapes & nut trees. I have around 150 fruit trees on my property and they will provide calories each and every year. Another thing one can do is have ponds stocked with fish. My pond is just an acre in size, but since I feed them every day, it is loaded with channel cats ranging in size from small yearlings to 30 lbs. That is thousands of lbs of fresh meat always available and with management, self sustaining.

    Guess my point is, after the crisis hits, it will probably be too late to try to figure out how to be self sufficient.
    Last edited by Redneck; 07-31-2020 at 08:48 PM.

  10. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Redneck View Post

    Also keep in mind, that first year, if living a rural life like me, one could expect to harvest a fair amount of wild game. That will certainly add to the calorie count. I can likewise add to the calorie count by sharing resources with my neighbors with cattle herds. But then there are things rural preppers can do now to provide a steady supply of calories each & every year. One of which is by planting & maintaining orchards, berry patches, grapes & nut trees. I have around 150 fruit trees on my property and they will provide calories each and every year. Another thing one can do is have ponds stocked with fish. My pond is just an acre in size, but since I feed them every day, it is loaded with channel cats ranging in size from small yearlings to 30 lbs. That is thousands of lbs of fresh meat always available and with management, self sustaining.
    .
    Like you I also have cows, chickens, and fruit trees but no fish pond. I only keep a tiny garden but a friend farms about 60 acres across the road, mostly corn, soybeans, and wheat but no one lives on that property or the property beyond. But while having no close neighbors allows me the ability to grow more food it also will become an attractant to people looking for food.

    It's generally agreed on that lots of people from urban areas will "run for the hills". This will make working a large garden potentially hazardous. especially for the 1st year or so. Bellowing cows and crowing roosters can be heard from a mile away as can the sound of a diesel tractor or roto-tiller.
    We plan to run saws and tractors, target practice, and other noisy items for the 1st few weeks. After that the plan is to go very quiet and stay within 150 yds of the house which will make large scale gardening and tending the livestock more difficult.
    Redneck likes this.

  11. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elvis View Post
    Keep in mind that you need to consider "calories per day" when determining how much food you actually have. Assuming not working too hard the average person will require at least 2000 calories per day. Men closer to 2300, women about 1800 calories per day for moderate work. Working hard outside I burn about 2600 calories a day. A fireman fighting wildfires all day will burn about 3500 calories. My wife working at the office burns about 1400 calories a day.
    MOST prepared long term storage food kits barely provide 1200 calories per day, During WW2 1100 calories a day was considered starvation level feeding for prisoners sitting most of the day and a slow death for those who worked. Legacy Foods does provide the minimum required 2000 calories per day, Wise and Mountain House do not.

    2000 calories per day. Check your stored food and do the math.
    A #10 can of white rice (about 6 1/2 lbs) is 15,000 calories or about 7 days of food.
    A #10 can of dehydrated green beans is about 1800 calories or about 1 day of food.

    Everybody's budget is different but none of us are professional organic farmers, especially with limited fuel supplies. Since the 1st years crop may not do so well I think having at least 18 months at 2000 calories per day of food on hand would be the goal. That way if your 1st year growing food fails you've got a second growing year to figure out how to farm. So for me the goal is 18 months at 2000+ calories per day. We're not there yet.

    While I'd like to I can't afford enough food to feed the few neighbors I have. Plus there are all sorts of problems with trying to feed others. But at the same time I understand that without a few more people living here I can't realistically defend the property that I would hope to grow food on. We have a few family members who probably would join us (yes, I've discussed this with them) and put up a bit for them but probably will never have enough to have 2000 calories per day for 18 months for everybody.
    The charts say that your wife burns about 1400 calories a day, but there's no way to know how many she actually burns. I would guess it could be plus/minus 200 calories. If I'm doing physical labor (and I don't mean weeding the garden, I mean, for example, double digging the garden) I can consume about 1500 calories a day and maintain weight, but otherwise, I have to cut back to under 1200. Those charts are useful starting points, but it pays to know your own body. That being said, 2,000 calories a day is a good goal.

 

 
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