Dryad’s saddle or pheasant back mushroom
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Dryad’s saddle or pheasant back mushroom

This is a discussion on Dryad’s saddle or pheasant back mushroom within the Food, Health and Fitness Survival forums, part of the Survivalist, Prepper, Bushcrafter, Forest Rangers category; So I have been missing out while looking for morals which we only found a few we came across these which turns out good to ...

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Thread: Dryad’s saddle or pheasant back mushroom

  1. #1
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    Dryad’s saddle or pheasant back mushroom

    So I have been missing out while looking for morals which we only found a few we came across these which turns out good to go to eat a d very plentiful watched several videos on picking tender played with pick several lets just say they are right small tight spores in the underside are far more tender. Fried some up in butter salt and pepper very tasty looking forward to deep frying some.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Dryad’s saddle or pheasant back mushroom-20200520_110709_1590110503001.jpg  

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    Dryad’s saddle or pheasant back mushroom-20200520_110131_1590110615841.jpg  

    Dryad’s saddle or pheasant back mushroom-20200521_135432_1590110679326.jpg  

    Dryad’s saddle or pheasant back mushroom-20200521_143542_1590110724015.jpg  


  2. #2
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    Mouth-watering.
    RubberDuck likes this.
    "Reality is almost always wrong."
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by RubberDuck View Post
    So I have been missing out while looking for morals which we only found a few we came across these which turns out good to go to eat a d very plentiful watched several videos on picking tender played with pick several lets just say they are right small tight spores in the underside are far more tender. Fried some up in butter salt and pepper very tasty looking forward to deep frying some.
    Are those "chicken of the woods" duck?
    RubberDuck likes this.

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  5. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by 65mustang View Post
    Are those "chicken of the woods" duck?
    No but those have been seen out here I just am not sure if they are spring or fall.
    These are tasty though worth the look

  6. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by RubberDuck View Post
    No but those have been seen out here I just am not sure if they are spring or fall.
    These are tasty though worth the look







    You may discover this mushroom during the summer and fall but rarely in winter or spring.

    The top surface of Chicken of the Woods is bright orange which can be either more reddish or yellowish than you see here. It tends to lighten in color near the edges. This mushroom has no gills, instead its bright yellow undersurface is covered with tiny pores. The young Chicken of the Woods is “succulent” and has a mild flavor. Older specimens tend to change color as they develop, as well as become brittle. The young mushrooms have bright yellows and oranges; in age they dull to yellow and then pure white.

    A good tree can yield up to 50 pounds, but be wary of older fungi as they toughen and develop a sour flavor! If you have found a specimen worthy of collection, you can harvest the mushrooms and return the next year for another crop. Or cut just the outer edge (about 5 cm of the fungus) and return later in the season for a second helping. Be wary of Chickens growing on conifers (in the Northeast) as they are a different species and can cause poisoning. Chicken of the Woods can make a fine chicken substitute as long as you make sure to fully cook the mushroom.

    Chicken of the Woods grows in trees that are either living or decaying. These mushrooms cause a reddish brown heart-rot of wood. If the mushrooms are seen fruiting, you can be sure that the fungus has already attacked the tree. They can destabilize a tree by hollowing out its center—this can be problematic for forest owners.

    Chasing the Chicken of the Woods. ... Also always avoid chicken of the woods growing on conifers, eucalyptus, or cedar trees, as these are reported to contain toxins that can make people sick. Even if you never plan on eating one, this is a fascinating mushroom.
    https://michpics.wordpress.com/2012/...-of-the-woods/
    Last edited by hawgrider; 05-22-2020 at 05:27 AM.
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  7. #6
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    RubberDuck fried some of these up at deer camp this weekend so I got to try them. The smaller ones taste like Steak! Yes steak pretty good and..... Im still alive LOL!
    RubberDuck likes this.
    "The clever cat eats cheese and breathes down rat holes with baited breath." W. C. Fields
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