Long Term Egg Storage
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Long Term Egg Storage

This is a discussion on Long Term Egg Storage within the Food, Health and Fitness Survival forums, part of the Survivalist, Prepper, Bushcrafter, Forest Rangers category; OK, I don't recall if I found this on this site, but I did a search and couldn't find anything. So, sorry if this is ...

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Thread: Long Term Egg Storage

  1. #1
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    Lightbulb Long Term Egg Storage

    OK, I don't recall if I found this on this site, but I did a search and couldn't find anything. So, sorry if this is a repost...

    Being this is our first full season with egg laying chickens, I was concerned that they would stop laying over the winter, to molt, and we would have to go back to buying them in the store. Well, learning they were all chicks when we bought them last March, and they probably don't molt the first year, we've had consistent egg laying through the winter. Now, this winter will be different, but...

    So, I decided to try and store some eggs, longer than the counter life, then fridge life. I have tried a couple now, and they are no different than fresh ones in any way I can tell. I stored 4 dozen in early December 2019. Last week, I took out 2, cooked them up, and tried them. No issues.

    This is what I did - it's NOT my method - like I mentioned above, I either found it here or elsewhere, but it seems to work fine and I will be doing it again at the end of this year. I have read nothing harmful about this method, so, just sharing it for others for information purposes. I stored them in a clean bucket, meant for long term food storage, with the lid on, but not tight.

    Long term egg storage: 8-12 months
    hydrated lime - building supply section
    8 qt water
    1 oz, by weight, hydrated lime per quart of water
    add unwashed, clean eggs
    Keep lid on top - olive oil on top of water
    You don't want water evaporation

    When ready to eat, remove, rinse, and use


    Now, when I took them out, they were slimy - oil, and also covered in a thick white substance - I assume the lime. After washing, they were good to go.

    Hope it helps...

    peace,
    Michael J.

  2. #2
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    On the ships we used to routinely provision for 90 days. I know for a fact eggs will last 3 months in a refrigerated space, no problem. Beyond that I have no experience.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chiefster23 View Post
    On the ships we used to routinely provision for 90 days. I know for a fact eggs will last 3 months in a refrigerated space, no problem. Beyond that I have no experience.
    I kept fresh eggs from October and they were fine in late January

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  5. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Broncosfan View Post
    I kept fresh eggs from October and they were fine in late January
    I also never wash my eggs before they go into the refrigerator. Wipe off or knock dirt of with fine sandpaper.
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  6. #5
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    The biggest thing you can do to help your eggs store longer is to keep your eggs clean as possible. Not washing until your ready to use. Washing can push bacteria into the egg. Keeping fresh shaving inside your laying boxes is a must. This had been a difficult one for me this year so far. I add new shavings almost everyday but this this has been a wet winter and the chicken lot is a muddy mess. I put straw at the entrance of the pen and inside where they spend a lot of their time

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    I watched a documentary on youtube the other night of a crew sailing for quite a while around the pacific.
    The cook told of how he keeps something like 2000 eggs from going bad.

    First, I don't know if the eggs he had were straight from the farm but do know he didn't refrigerate them for lack of room.

    He said he coats each egg with Vaseline, puts it back in the crate and then turns the crate upside down once a week to keep the yolk "centered" in the egg. He said the yolk floating to the bottom will start to deteriorate the shell.

    He was turning whole crates at a time so it wasn't a big deal to do once a week. Made sense.

    The longest I've kept them unrefrigerated is two weeks...also on a sailing trip and during the summer. I got eggs that had never been refrigerated and...they were fine at the end of the journey.
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  8. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robie View Post
    I watched a documentary on youtube the other night of a crew sailing for quite a while around the pacific.
    The cook told of how he keeps something like 2000 eggs from going bad.

    First, I don't know if the eggs he had were straight from the farm but do know he didn't refrigerate them for lack of room.

    He said he coats each egg with Vaseline, puts it back in the crate and then turns the crate upside down once a week to keep the yolk "centered" in the egg. He said the yolk floating to the bottom will start to deteriorate the shell.

    He was turning whole crates at a time so it wasn't a big deal to do once a week. Made sense.

    The longest I've kept them unrefrigerated is two weeks...also on a sailing trip and during the summer. I got eggs that had never been refrigerated and...they were fine at the end of the journey.
    Refrigeration is not needed but I used to doing it. I read an article that in Europe that eggs are not refrigerated and just set on the shelves until purchased. Part of the reason for refrigeration is do to the way hens are in cages and the eggs get filthy then there washed and coated again before packaged. Its just easier for me to put them in the refrigerator right after collecting them.
    Last edited by Broncosfan; 03-24-2020 at 07:54 PM.
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  9. #8
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    As mentioned above, I think, once you wash/clean an egg, you must refrigerate it as you've removed it's protective coating. That's why the stores sell them in the refrigerated section. We store ours, just wiped clean, on the counter for 2-3 weeks (if they last that long since we sell (used to) them). Then, after that, we could refrigerate them for that long also.

    It was the months long I was testing, and it seems to work fine. I will take 2-3 out each month and see how long they last in the mixture mentioned in the OP.

    Peace,
    Michael J.

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael_Js View Post
    As mentioned above, I think, once you wash/clean an egg, you must refrigerate it as you've removed it's protective coating. That's why the stores sell them in the refrigerated section. We store ours, just wiped clean, on the counter for 2-3 weeks (if they last that long since we sell (used to) them). Then, after that, we could refrigerate them for that long also.

    It was the months long I was testing, and it seems to work fine. I will take 2-3 out each month and see how long they last in the mixture mentioned in the OP.

    Peace,
    Michael J.
    Thanks for this thread; I saved a copy of the OP incase we ever get chickens.
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  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael_Js View Post
    As mentioned above, I think, once you wash/clean an egg, you must refrigerate it as you've removed it's protective coating. That's why the stores sell them in the refrigerated section. We store ours, just wiped clean, on the counter for 2-3 weeks (if they last that long since we sell (used to) them). Then, after that, we could refrigerate them for that long also.

    It was the months long I was testing, and it seems to work fine. I will take 2-3 out each month and see how long they last in the mixture mentioned in the OP.

    Peace,
    Michael J.
    That is partially true. The main problem that I have read is the change in temperature that can effect the shell that lets bacteria in. Just like the pores in our skin that open with temperature change. I like the idea of no refrigeration I'm just not going to do it as I rather not have several dozen eggs on my counter at a time. Years ago eggs were always left out in the USA. Once refrigerated they cannot be left out. I remember seeing a mix you could purchase in a Amish catalog that help preserve eggs for storage I forget the name right this second but I know its here in Ohio. That protective coating that is applied as the hen is laying the egg is called the bloom I believe.
    Last edited by Broncosfan; 03-24-2020 at 07:57 PM.

 

 
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