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Trauma Kits

This is a discussion on Trauma Kits within the First Aid and Medical Preparedness forums, part of the Survivalist, Prepper, Bushcrafter, Forest Rangers category; This site might be helpful??....nice first aid kids and trauma kits here..usually same items and cheaper than Amazon in some cases...I've ordered lots from these ...

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Thread: Trauma Kits

  1. #11
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    This site might be helpful??....nice first aid kids and trauma kits here..usually same items and cheaper than Amazon in some cases...I've ordered lots from these folks...very fast - great cust service...I built my BOB here...very helpful -- http://store.survivalist101.com/
    RedLion likes this.

  2. #12
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    I use the same bag as my car medical bag.
    Contents aside, I would say that organization of the contents will be important.
    Keep all like-items together, label the compartment with med tape and a sharpie so you're not searching for a particular item under stress
    Put your name and a last-inspection date on the front of the bag so that your own bag comes back to you when there are multiple med bags spread across a scene
    The inspection date will prompt you to re-inspect and re-stock at whatever interval you select. I do an annual inspection.

    As to the contents, I'm not going to get down in the dirt about one level of training vs another. Carry the stuff that you can use with your level of training.
    If you want to carry stuff that exceeds your medical training, on the theory that maybe someone will be present who is trained to use that item, that's on you.
    I was CLS trained for my deployments, but realistically I've been retired out for 4 years now.
    I follow Clint's advice and know my limits as they are now.
    I keep current on CPR, basic first aid and other medical issues that my LEO employer requires, and that's about it.

    My main talking point about med supplies would be to carry far more than you THINK you need.
    We aren't talking putting a Band-Aid on a boo boo.
    We're talking about handling trauma with all of it's related body fluids loss.
    You are going to go through gauze, combat dressings etc at a far faster clip than you might think possible, if you've never had to deal with it before.
    The human body has an amazing amount of fluids in it when you see them leaking out at a fast pace.

    If you aren't having to hump the bag, you can never have too many med supplies
    Fill that thing up. Organize it. The contents are up to you.
    Keep a couple of hi vis chem lights stuffed into the thing because Murphy will pop up and you'll need to be digging through the bag on the darkest night of the year when your EDC light decided to go tits up on you
    I also keep some EMT shears clipped to the bag where I know they'll be .
    Last edited by tc556guy; 07-07-2016 at 09:38 AM.
    RedLion, artboy, Medic33 and 1 others like this.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by tc556guy View Post
    I use the same bag as my car medical bag.
    Contents aside, I would say that organization of the contents will be important.
    Keep all like-items together, label the compartment with med tape and a sharpie so you're not searching for a particular item under stress
    Put your name and a last-inspection date on the front of the bag so that your own bag comes back to you when there are multiple med bags spread across a scene
    The inspection date will prompt you to re-inspect and re-stock at whatever interval you select. I do an annual inspection.

    As to the contents, I'm not going to get down in the dirt about one level of training vs another. Carry the stuff that you can use with your level of training.
    If you want to carry stuff that exceeds your medical training, on the theory that maybe someone will be present who is trained to use that item, that's on you.
    I was CLS trained for my deployments, but realistically I've been retired out for 4 years now.
    I follow Clint's advice and know my limits as they are now.
    I keep current on CPR, basic first aid and other medical issues that my LEO employer requires, and that's about it.

    My main talking point about med supplies would be to carry far more than you THINK you need.
    We aren't talking putting a Band-Aid on a boo boo.
    We're talking about handling trauma with all of it's related body fluids loss.
    You are going to go through gauze, combat dressings etc at a far faster clip than you might think possible, if you've never had to deal with it before.
    The human body has an amazing amount of fluids in it when you see them leaking out at a fast pace.

    If you aren't having to hump the bag, you can never have too many med supplies
    Fill that thing up. Organize it. The contents are up to you.
    Keep a couple of hi vis chem lights stuffed into the thing because Murphy will pop up and you'll need to be digging through the bag on the darkest night of the year when your EDC light decided to go tits up on you
    I also keep some EMT shears clipped to the bag where I know they'll be .
    I appreciate the feedback. I may not have an abundance of formal training, but thanks to time in Iraq, I am not void of experience. This includes treating head trauma and serious lacerations on two occasions (one being a civilian truck driver that crushed her cab-over onto herself), and one fairly serious stomach puncture of an Iraqi civilian. I do not care/need to get formal training for my work, but for personal knowledge and need.

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  5. #14
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    Kits are nice, but the commercially sold bags have a load of crap you'll never use....ever! Proper training will give you the insight into exactly what you may need for the traumas or other medical situations you may come across. As was previously mentioned, White Knight syndrome can kill someone if you don't know EXACTLY what you're doing in many trauma situations.

    Untrained folks using Kwik-Clot for example, can cause more damage than other methods of immediate treatment for intense hemorrhaging. (The military does not use the product any longer, due to their experience with it).

    As an SF trained medic in my previous life (before I became a pilot), and with a wife who is a very senior military critical care and flight nurse, we have a very substantial kit at home, capable of total Golden Hour treatment and stabilization, but some of the items we would use are only for well-trained personnel....not first responders, or ARC first aid'er, and we are still missing items we are trying to acquire for potential use.

    By the way, if any of you guys are next deployed to Afghanistan...would you mind bringing me back some Poppy seeds that I can store long term, and grow when the SHTF to produce appropriate pain meds...... I had some that were lost in travel, damn it!
    SAR-1L, artboy and Medic33 like this.
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  6. #15
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    With all respect that bag is 139$, I can buy two CAT tourniquets, and a crap ton of wound packing materials for that price.
    From what I learned in BCON (Bleeding Control, this was a distilled version of the TCCC, Tactical Combat Casualty Care ) training,
    Anything beyond a Tourniquet or wound packed with sterile gauze is pretty much going to require a surgeon.

    If you haven't taken a BCON course I highly suggest it. Rita Bass Medical Institute up in Denver, CO
    has a great course for about 35$ that you won't regret.
    RedLion and Maol9 like this.
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  7. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedLion View Post
    I went ahead and ordered this trauma kit with a couple of other items including some clotting sponges and compression bandages. 4.5 out of 5 stars with 325 reviews.

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    Any more qualified folks have opinions related to the kit and what I may add in addition to what I mentioned above? I am a combat lifesaver trained along with the usual first aid and cpr. One of these days I will get the time to get my EMT training.
    Thanks for this post, RedLion, . . .

    Our VVA chapter just acquired a pretty substantial first aid / trauma kit, . . . having most of what you have in that bag, . . . and quite honestly, it was about the same price. We have been fortunate in that some 25 different guys have traveled an average of 20 miles each to honor fallen vets, . . . never an accident, emergency, etc.

    We figured we were probably traveling on borrowed time so we got a kit together.

    Wish I had seen this one, . . . would have made it a lot simpler.

    And I'd just like to make a comment to all the naysayers that have piped up here, . . . you really need to find a hobby, . . . your negative and bombastic comments do nothing to add to the conversation, . . . they only assuage your negative personalities.

    Having the equipment is the first and MOST IMPORTANT part of providing first aid / trauma care. Anyone with any training at all will do the best he/she can under the circumstances, . . . but if they do not have the tools, . . . they cannot do anything.

    May God bless,
    Dwight
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  8. #17
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    what dwight55 said sums it up~~ "
    Having the equipment is the first and MOST IMPORTANT part of providing first aid / trauma care. Anyone with any training at all will do the best he/she can under the circumstances, . . . but if they do not have the tools, . . . they cannot do anything." Better to have something to provide help than nothing at all??
    Denton and dwight55 like this.

  9. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by artboy View Post
    what dwight55 said sums it up~~ "
    Having the equipment is the first and MOST IMPORTANT part of providing first aid / trauma care. Anyone with any training at all will do the best he/she can under the circumstances, . . . but if they do not have the tools, . . . they cannot do anything." Better to have something to provide help than nothing at all??
    I dunno. If it is beyond the basics that I learned in the army, I'd just root around the kit, trying to find crimpers, luggers and a soldering iron.
    *Why is there no Pro-Seal in this stupid bag?!?! Bob has a gunshot hole that needs sealing!*
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  10. #19
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    tc556 -good post dude, labeling and glo-sticks very important. same to Sitting elf -I agree -excactly.
    sar-1 -splinting requires more then a turney -same with impaled objects. and also can you explain why you would need to pack a wound with gauze( you know like say for a car wreck?)-just asking dude and yes any training is priceless and most people would be better off spending 35 bucks on roller gauze and ace wraps than 135 on an advancedtacticalendofcivilizationtheraptureiscomin g medical kit.
    SAR-1L likes this.
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  11. #20
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    And if most of us took the advice of some of the loud mouthed, . . . perfect opinionated personnel that think they know it all, . . . that "advancedtacticalendofcivilizationtheraptureiscomi n g medical kit" just might become priceless in a multiple vehicle crash, . . . when the driver behind you just happens to be a trauma surgeon on his way to a tennis lesson.

    Again, . . . it costs nothing to have it and not need it, . . . it is priceless when you need it and don't have it.

    May God bless,
    Dwight
    RedLion likes this.
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