Should we carry tourniquets in our vehicles? - Page 2
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Should we carry tourniquets in our vehicles?

This is a discussion on Should we carry tourniquets in our vehicles? within the First Aid and Medical Preparedness forums, part of the Survivalist, Prepper, Bushcrafter, Forest Rangers category; I find the neck tourniquet will stop all blood flow within about 3-4 mins if applied properly...

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Thread: Should we carry tourniquets in our vehicles?

  1. #11
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    I find the neck tourniquet will stop all blood flow within about 3-4 mins if applied properly
    Prepared One and Deebo like this.
    I'll be done when I'm finished, if that's not fast enough, take a number please.

    Stupidity, the New Common Sense

  2. #12
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    @Lunatic, LOL, I would sure like to introduce you to my mother-in-law. But then, she's still doing "five to ten" at Waupun.
    ...No matter where you are it's enemy territory...

  3. #13
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    Yes, have one. First, know how to use it properly.

    I spotted a new kit at Academy Sports last night that included a tourney.
    Should we carry tourniquets in our vehicles?-trauma_pack_3.jpg

    https://www.rei.com/product/153035/a...ii-medical-kit

    That is a fantastic option if you want something already packed and ready to throw in your bag/vehicle.
    Can the bleeding be controlled with a pressure wrap? Good, use that.
    If it cannot, use the tourniquet.
    "Every normal man must be tempted, at times, to spit on his hands, hoist the black flag, and begin slitting throats." - H. L. Mencken

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  5. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Denton View Post
    I was told that tourniquets are no longer recommended. Why? Because people have become to stupid to properly apply them. Many times, good-intending dummies place the tourniquet on the wrong side of the wound. Other times, they place it on top of the wound. I find that to be very disconcerting.
    Wait.....what? I always thought you used them around the patients neck, no matter where the wound is.


    As an aside. All vehicles and range bags include tourniquets as part of the first aid system. I also carry a blow out kit in addition. When you need one, you need one. They are not that expensive.
    Kauboy and Denton like this.
    " All great things are simple, and many can be expressed in single words: Freedom, Justice, Honor, Duty, Mercy, Hope" .Hidden Content

  6. #15
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    I suspect most folks would do more harm than good with one, but by all means, get one. Maybe someone who does know how to use one appropriately will be around. They used to teach the use of one in the Boy Scouts, for goodness sakes. Now, as Denton said, most people are too stupid to do it properly.
    Maine-Marine likes this.

  7. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prepared One View Post
    All vehicles and range bags include tourniquets as part of the first aid system.
    I am one of those who has no formal training in the use of a tourniquet. However, just having one in my truck ups the chances that a "first responder" arriving on the scene will use my first aid items to save the victim.

    In my area we used to have survival classes for civilians. I worked at a dental clinic at that time and attended these classes. I have not seen any such classes posted in our newspaper or mentioned on the radio. Even if the civilian used rudimentary actions, it would still buy some time for the professionals on their way to help.
    ...No matter where you are it's enemy territory...

  8. #17
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    In Brazil there was once a law that said fist aid kits were mandatory in all cars. Everyone had to rush and buy one. My mother got one of those, and it was completely useless. The scisors that came in it would not even cut the bandages o.O
    So after a while the law was removed because they realized that the first aid kit was useless, and without proper trainning people would cause more harm than goo to an injured person.
    Most people cannot even tie bandages, let alone making a correct tourniquet. Sadly there is no first aid training available for the average person around this parts. Most trust that an ambulance will come and rescue an injured person. Anyone with medical training will just say to do nothing with an injured person until help arrives. But help does not always arrive in time :’(
    So, if there was some training available, I would take the classes, but so far my knowledge on it is quite limited. I do carry a first aid kit in the car and wouldn't know how to correctly make a tourniquet if it was needed.
    Kauboy likes this.

  9. #18
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    IMHO as a retire paramedic. Obviously I carry a fairly well equiped first aid kit in my car. In it, I had the
    makings of a tourniquet. It has only been in the last year that I invested in a quick application tourniquet.
    As stated by a few, your decision to apply a tourniquet may have to be defended in court, if you screw up.
    If you screw up, it'll probably be because you didn't have the training to understand what you were doing,
    and what can and will happen if you screw up. Sure if a accident victim looses an arm, they will probably
    need a tourniquet in the first 30 to 60 seconds. Having been envolved in a court case for another paramedic
    who used an esophageal airway incorrectly, there by causing CPR on a heart attack victim to be completely
    ineffective. Of course the patient was not saved. His wife and family sued the paramedic. What saved his
    bacon was the fact he was not on duty and in a town 20 miles from his home. The judge ruled that why it
    was unfortunate the patient could not be saved, the paramedic was infact covered by the "Good Samaratan"
    in Illinois at the time. However, the hospital he was affiliated with and the volunteer fire dept. he worked with
    rescinded his paramedic certification. If you carry a specific piece of equipment, most people will think you
    should know how to use it. My advice, if you don't know what the hell you're doing, follow basicfirst aid
    treatment. First elevate the extremity, followed by direct pressure on the wound. You can aways carry the
    supplies necessary to make a tourniqet (a triangular bandage used with a stick works well) or even use a
    blood pressure cuff. learn how to use the blood pressure cuff, it's really not that hard. If the injury is an
    amputation, you probably don't have much choice. Remember, if cause injury, you will probably be sued.
    Maine-Marine likes this.
    I really want one of these!Hidden Content

  10. #19
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    A local firearms instructor has put on a “first aid for gunshot victims” class several times. The class was taught by a former special forces medic who now teaches to various government employees. The class primarily addressed gunshot wounds. He was very much in favor of tourniquets. I made up a basic kit to be included in my range bag. It includes a tourniquet, battle dressings, kwick-clot, chest seal, and tampons, and other misc. supplies. He stressed that you should have a tourniquet designed so that you can apply it to yourself one-handed and you should practice this manuver.
    Prepared One likes this.

  11. #20
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    What I'm seeing here is comments about using a tourniquet on strangers, but I might also be inclined to use it on myself or my wife, or maybe even friends and coworkers, just say'n.

    With my first aid/CPR training over the past 20 years it's been discussed many times that a tourniquet is the last resort to stop uncontrollable blood loss, I asked the retired Marine field medic to go into more detail on using one during my recent first aid recertification.
    I carry clotting sponges and pressure bandage, if they aren't working and help isn't going to arrive in time, then it's time to cut off the flow of blood.
    We also have the good samaritan law here in Washington.
    I'll be done when I'm finished, if that's not fast enough, take a number please.

    Stupidity, the New Common Sense

 

 
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