What should I put into my First Aid Kit?
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What should I put into my First Aid Kit?

This is a discussion on What should I put into my First Aid Kit? within the First Aid and Medical Preparedness forums, part of the Survivalist, Prepper, Bushcrafter, Forest Rangers category; Hi I bought this one: https://www.helikon-tex.com/en_eur/m...h-cordura.html It look nice a outer and a inner Bag. I need just something when I visit some bigger Events ...

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Thread: What should I put into my First Aid Kit?

  1. #1
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    Exclamation What should I put into my First Aid Kit?

    Hi
    I bought this one: https://www.helikon-tex.com/en_eur/m...h-cordura.html
    It look nice a outer and a inner Bag.
    I need just something when I visit some bigger Events where the change of some US Undet Terrorist Group Attack innocent People.

    From time to time I help Ladys when the wear unhealthy shoes and get some cut or bleeding.

    So I just looking for some Firstaid Stuff for 2 different Case:
    a) Someone have sever Injuries who I can tread (well if someone get hit by a Train and there organs fly around sure I dont play Tetris and try to fix it). But tread shot, granate explosion (that happen in Sweden from time to time ) and stabbing until the Ambulance arrive.
    Well for that celox came in mind?

    b) the other think is small injuries like I mention before. A Lady with flipflops who have just a cut or such harmless thinks who not even a doctor must be visit.
    I just thinks about alcohol wipes and plaster?! Medical Disinfection thinks?

    What should I also put into when you keep a) and b) in mind?
    Thanks

  2. #2
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    If you aren't trained in using trauma equipment, you risk screwing things up and making the situation worse. If you aren't trained, stick with the simple things.
    Celox and Quickclot are great. I know both come in a granule form, and that Quickclot has bandage options as well. These can work for stopping moderate to heavy blood flow when used with pressure bandages.
    Z-fold bandages
    Bloodstopper bandages
    gauze pads (4in/10.1cm or larger)
    gauze wrap
    self-adhering wrap (the kind that isn't sticky, but clings to itself)
    chest seals for closing sucking chest wounds (always in pairs in case of full through penetration to put one on entry wound and one on exit wound)
    tourniquets (know the proper way to use them or you risk making things worse)
    basic bandages ("plasters")
    SAM splint (for stabilizing a broken limb)
    rubber/nitrile gloves
    cutting shears (for removing clothing)
    burn gel
    "moleskin" (for blisters) (duct tape works well too)
    alcohol swabs/iodine swabs

    *** IF TRAINED AND KNOW THE FUNCTION ***
    nasal-pharyngeal kit (for opening a blocked airway)
    chest decompression needle (for relieving tension pneumothorax)

    Understand that you will NOT be able to treat everyone in a mass casualty situation. You shouldn't expect to. Triage and apply care to the ones that are as close to healthy and mobile as possible, but not quite. Wasting equipment on somebody who's head is split open to the skull, or is burned over their entire body, won't do any good. If people can move on their own, just get them to leave the area and wait for emergency services. You are looking for the folks with bleedouts, holes, cuts, burns, or broken limbs, but appear to be conscious and able to live if any care is given.
    You won't save everyone. Save who you can.
    "Every normal man must be tempted, at times, to spit on his hands, hoist the black flag, and begin slitting throats." - H. L. Mencken

  3. #3
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    Last week I would have thought about medicine (especially for those with diabetes), cotton balls, about 100 feet of bandages, sterile soap, etc.

    Then the forum blade-heads and I did some experimenting with stainless tools which might be needed for an emergency tracheotomy. The costs floored us--for one tool. Imagine the cost of several pairs of forceps!

    And all of this has to be packed like anything else, you know, "travel right travel light."
    ...No matter where you are it's enemy territory...

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  5. #4
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    Think about how big of a bag are you carrying. You may pack different for a few hour jaunt in the woods, your car, your home or bugging out. The longer you will be away or potentially be away the more stuff becomes necessary. Medical is important. Blistered feet, poison ivy, insect repellent, gun shot wounds, broken bones, infections, diarrhea, as well as medication taken daily. Bandages, splints hand disinfectant. Plus so much more.
    Blessed be God, my rock who trains my hands for battle, my fingers for war. Psalms 144:1

    Victory can depend on a dog or a goose---Napoleon

  6. #5
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    short replay. There is a German Med. Shop who offer me many produts.
    How about that: https://www.sammedical.com/products/sam-chest-seal
    Does it require a chest decompression needle?

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by User Name View Post
    short replay. There is a German Med. Shop who offer me many produts.
    How about that: https://www.sammedical.com/products/sam-chest-seal
    Does it require a chest decompression needle?
    This only makes sense of your trained on how to use it.
    NewRiverGeorge likes this.
    Blessed be God, my rock who trains my hands for battle, my fingers for war. Psalms 144:1

    Victory can depend on a dog or a goose---Napoleon

  8. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by User Name View Post
    short replay. There is a German Med. Shop who offer me many produts.
    How about that: https://www.sammedical.com/products/sam-chest-seal
    Does it require a chest decompression needle?
    Yes, those are great.
    No, you do not need a needle.
    Presuming the person hasn't been suffering with a chest cavity filling with air for 30 minutes or more, they should not need a decomp needle. A seal on the wound(s) to allow air out and prevent air in should work fine. (those chest seals)
    A decomp needle is more for those times when the lung has been punctured by a rib bone, and no external hole is present to let the air escape. Concussion blasts can cause this type of internal damage, and is not easily diagnosed at first.
    NewRiverGeorge likes this.
    "Every normal man must be tempted, at times, to spit on his hands, hoist the black flag, and begin slitting throats." - H. L. Mencken

  9. #8
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    As a retired paramedic, I really suggest you start by getting a firstaid class under your belt. As has been said,
    if you don't know how to use a piece of firstaid gear, you can be more dangerous that the original injury.
    NewRiverGeorge likes this.
    I really want one of these!Hidden Content

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by User Name View Post
    short replay. There is a German Med. Shop who offer me many produts.
    How about that: https://www.sammedical.com/products/sam-chest-seal
    Does it require a chest decompression needle?
    First I want to give you thumbs up for wanting to assemble the first aid kit. As I am sure you are aware, having the necessary items on hand can mean life or death. However, let me reinforce what Kauboy and Camel said, please make sure you are trained AND comfortable in the item(s) use. The last thing you want to do when trying to find the correct intercostal space is drop a lung with that chest decompression needle.
    1 Peter 2:24 KJV
    Who his own self bare our sins in his own body on the tree, that we, being dead to sins, should live unto righteousness: by whose stripes ye were healed.

 

 

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