DIY Activating Carbon - Page 3
Register

Welcome to the Prepper Forum / Survivalist Forum.

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed.

DIY Activating Carbon

This is a discussion on DIY Activating Carbon within the DIY forums, part of the General Discussion category; Whatever...

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3
Results 21 to 30 of 30
Like Tree20Likes

Thread: DIY Activating Carbon

  1. #21
    Mod Squad


    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    2,243
    Whatever


    Success Is going from failure to failure without losing your enthusiasm - anonymous

  2. #22
    Banned


    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    1,891
    if i think back to how to make 'char cloth' out of cotton,

    - you put the cotton in a small tin that has a small hole in the lid,
    - place the tin over a flame or fire until a smoke starts to come out of the the hole
    - when the smoke stops coming out of the hole, remove the tin from the fire.
    - What is left in the tin, is 'char cloth'

    Question: if I wanted to make char from wood, wouldn't I do something like place wood shavings into a tin, then repeat the same process?

    Next Question: If so, soaking the shavings in calcium cloride prior to placing it in the tin, makes it 'activated'?

    Is it this simple or have I missed something?

  3. #23
    Banned


    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    1,891
    what are my purchasing options? ie activated carbon from fish tanks? Brita filters?

  4. Remove Advertisements
    PrepperForums.net
    Advertisements
     

  5. #24
    Mod Squad


    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    2,243
    Here's an excellent article about making activated charcoal. This site also sells bulk activated charcoal.

    How to Make Activated Charcoal at Home


    Success Is going from failure to failure without losing your enthusiasm - anonymous

  6. #25
    Banned


    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    1,891
    I've seen that before, they obviously don't want anyone making their own.

  7. #26
    Senior Member


    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    SE WA.
    Posts
    6,086
    I believe that it is not that they don't want you to make your own - just that it is a very expensive and potentially lethal undertaking.

    Phospheric acid is a fairly safe chemical at normal temperatures but if you mix it with carbon compounds under the extreme temperatures requires to activate the carbon you risk making some very nasty compounds that can easily kill you. Germany in the first world war used the waste from their activated charcoal production (for gas masks) to make phosgene gas, mustard gas and others. In the recent past such waste products have been used to make nerve agents and binary chemical agents for war.

    For most "non-industrial" uses standard charcoal from wood can be used once it is boiled in water under 15 PSI pressure for 30 minutes and then dried at 300 degrees. This powder is not activated charcoal but it is an extremely effective water filter and in large enough quantities can be used to filter most airborne agents.

    There are common chemicals that can defeat most particulate filters and some more complex chemicals that can be made at home (Warning: lethality at 1 ppm) . I have used such a chemical to rid a home of roaches with 100% eradication in a three day exposure - although the home remained vacant for a week to allow the compound to degrade naturally roaches never returned up to 10 years later. The compound is accepted by living things as a sugar - so it even affects plants - and metabilizes into toxins within the organism. It can be absorbed through the skin and mucous membranes as well as ingested through the lungs and digestive systems.

    Chlorine and Ammonia are also very dangerous chemicals that can easikly be made and in an enclosed area can replace the oxygen in the local atmosphere which will make any mask ineffectual unless it is supplimented with an enclosed oxygen supply.



    Among the natural rights of the colonists are these: First a right to life, secondly to liberty, and thirdly to property; together with the right to defend them in the best manner they can.
    Samuel Adams

  8. #27
    Banned


    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    1,891
    Yes, I agree that they discuss some pretty dangerous chemicals, but calcium chloride , as the OP mentioned, is a possible chemical. And, it doesn't appear in that article.

    When I looked up the uses for Calcium Chloride, wiki included it as a sodium substitute for making dill pickles. Doesn't this sound like a pretty safe chemical if it is already in our dill pickles?

  9. #28
    Senior Member


    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    SE WA.
    Posts
    6,086
    Yes, under normal temperatures and in low concentrations it is fine. What happens when you heat it in high concentrations with carbon? I do know that it is a corrosive chemical used as an antifreeze in heavy equipment tires. They use it as a preservative (in very small amounts) in food that is acidic because it is caustic (like lye) and the acid reduces that action.

    It might be interesting to note that our bodies contain small amounts of arsenic, copper, lead and other chemicals that in even "moderate" doses can lead to health problems and even death. Whithout a chemistry background it would be dificult to say what concerns you might have when mixing known compounds under heat, pressure or any extraordinary conditions.



    Among the natural rights of the colonists are these: First a right to life, secondly to liberty, and thirdly to property; together with the right to defend them in the best manner they can.
    Samuel Adams

  10. #29
    Banned


    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    1,891
    You raise a good point about the heating of chemicals. Most substances might convert into carcinogens, no? Do I need to be fussy about wood choice?

  11. #30
    Mod Squad


    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    2,243
    I think this is a great thread, thanks to the OP!

    I will probably never make or activate charcoal, but it's good to know how, just in case.

    Here's an interesting article about how they made charcoal in the old days by Prof. Gerald Eggert of the Penn State College of Engineering...

    How To Make Charcoal
    tinkerhell likes this.


    Success Is going from failure to failure without losing your enthusiasm - anonymous

 

 
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Carbon steel or stainless steel for your blade?
    By Oddcaliber in forum Knives, Swords, Blades, Axes, Spears, Daggers, Machetes
    Replies: 36
    Last Post: 10-10-2016, 12:23 AM
  2. Bushmaster carbon 15 ???
    By Deebo in forum General Talk
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 02-15-2014, 08:42 AM
  3. Smoke and Carbon Monoxide Alarms
    By survival in forum Preppers Retreat and Lodge
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 09-24-2012, 03:53 PM
Back to Top