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Sawmills

This is a discussion on Sawmills within the DIY forums, part of the General Discussion category; Lol alot to think about thx guys. The only reason I ask is I got the land and I have to clear it myself as ...

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Thread: Sawmills

  1. #11
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    Lol alot to think about thx guys. The only reason I ask is I got the land and I have to clear it myself as I expand the farm. So I am dropping trees every couple days and piling logs up and burning the brush off. I want to make structural lumber I got a TON of trees I want to use it in a timber framed house latter on so I would have to use 4x6s to 8x12s this with CSEBs and I think I got 80% of my material cost covered. My property was clear cut about 30 years ago and now has tons of southern pine trees ranging from 5 inches on the small side to 24 inches in diameter. Sounds like with a decent pole barn I could rough saw it put it under cover and just leave it for a year or two. What do guys think of that.
    rice paddy daddy and Slippy like this.

  2. #12
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    An option?




  3. #13
    The Good Cop


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    Well, now we have a better understanding. You have the trees on your own property and you are going to cut them anyway, and would not like to waste the resource.
    You would have to get an experienced hand to show you how to stack your cut timber for maximum airflow, and yes it would take several years to dry.

    But, be advised - SYP, Southern Yellow Pine, was used quite a bit back when I started in the business simply because there was so much of it. However, it is not a real stable specie for 2X4 studs, or basically any 2X dimensional lumber. It twists and warps. Nowadays SYP is mainly used for pressure treated lumber and plywood. The top grades of SYP - #1, Select, and Select Structural are still used for roof trusses, but most construction is now done with SPF, better known as spruce.

    But I understand you wanting to put your timber to use. I say, go for it!
    Something to think about - instead of buying your own mill, I understand there are guys who will bring their mill to you and cut your logs. But in that case they and you would be on a strict timetable. With your own mill you could be more flexible. 25 years ago when I was thinking buying my own mill and custom cutting for hire a basic mill started around $6,000. I have no idea what one would be today.

    Good luck and keep us up to date.
    Slippy and Arklatex like this.
    "There is nothing so exhilarating as to be shot at without result." Winston Churchill
    "Leave the artillerymen alone, they are an obstinate lot." Napoleon
    Member: VFW, American Legion, Vietnam Veterans of America, Society of the 5th Infantry Division, Sons of the American Revolution.

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  5. #14
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    Love the fact they your thinking ahead. I have Ni answers, but good luck.
    RIP Corporal BRADLEY COY 6/18/1992-10/24/2014

  6. #15
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    Apex,

    I commend you on your project and wish you the best. I, sadly will be your buzzkill because I am well versed on Southern Yellow Pine.

    Southern Yellow Pine, as RPD points out, is a very unstable wood that will twist, warp, cup and turn like no other wood. It is a softwood species that is made up of cellulose and lignin and water. That's pretty much it.

    Because of that, most SYP manufacturers kiln dry SYP to 19% moisture content or below. To buy a kiln, you and I will have to knock over a big bank and then win the lottery. They are pretty expensive.

    The inherent chemical makeup of the species, makes it the best species to be treated to prevent rot, termites etc...but not the best species to air dry and build a home/structure with. It will move on you, twist on you, cup on you and quickly rot on you...if the termites don't get it first. Especially in the south.

    Air drying SYP in North Florida to get to 19% or below Moisture Content will be next to impossible. If you do not get it to 19% or below, every time it rains, every season that comes and goes, will cause the wood to expand and contract.

    PM me and I'll be glad to assist but I do not want you to go to a huge effort to build something with untreated, high moisture content SYP cut to your own specs on a sawmill that you paid good money for.

    I spent a number of years (18) in the Forest Resource Industry (Paper, Packaging, Building Materials, and have an Operations/Manufacturing Degree specializing in Forest Products. Slippy Lodge is also a Tree Farm.

    What you are trying to do can be done but your expectations should be limited.

    Slippy

  7. #16
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    Ahh see now I know, I mean to me they looked tall and straight but they are still living. Maybe ill drop um trim um and trade them to a local mill for a credit or something instead not much more then I am putting into them right now and prolly worth more in the long run if they will take 20ft to 25ft sections. Eh either way I try to be as self sufficient as possible. This forum has to have more skill and knowledge than any other per capita.
    Thanks guys
    Slippy likes this.

  8. #17
    The Good Cop


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    The pine that is cut in my area is sent to a pulp mill and made into paper. That's where mine went. I was able to get enough money for the trees to hire a bulldozer to push up the stumps and a backhoe to dig a hole and bury them.
    Slippy likes this.
    "There is nothing so exhilarating as to be shot at without result." Winston Churchill
    "Leave the artillerymen alone, they are an obstinate lot." Napoleon
    Member: VFW, American Legion, Vietnam Veterans of America, Society of the 5th Infantry Division, Sons of the American Revolution.

  9. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by ApexPredator View Post
    Ahh see now I know, I mean to me they looked tall and straight but they are still living. Maybe ill drop um trim um and trade them to a local mill for a credit or something instead not much more then I am putting into them right now and prolly worth more in the long run if they will take 20ft to 25ft sections. Eh either way I try to be as self sufficient as possible. This forum has to have more skill and knowledge than any other per capita.
    Thanks guys
    Contact a local forester and they may give you a free quote to cut your trees. "Cruising Timber" is the terminology that they will use. Like RPD writes, depending on the "stumpage price of the day" cut SYP is often sent to a pulp mill. You may make some money to clear some land or fix the roads that the logger tears up. You'll have trees that they can use for "softwood pulp", "hardwood pulp", or for "softwood lumber" or for "hardwood lumber". Each will bring their own price.

    The last time I had my forester cruise my timber for an estimate, I wouldn't have made any money after repairing my roads from the logging machines. So be aware of that.

    But for a hobby, I think you can still find a good used sawmill. For a chicken house or even a pole barn, you might be OK, but any wood that has ground contact I would prime with a high quality exterior paint/primer. Any horizontal type wood that collects moisture should also be primed unless you can send it to a treater.
    rice paddy daddy and Arklatex like this.

  10. #19
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    No experience with SYP but you might want to check the Timberframing section of the Forestry Forum. I'm sure someone there will know if it is suitable for TF building

    Timber Framing/Log construction

    With timber frames the wood is often worked green and allowed to dry after the building has been erected. Not sure if this is the case with SYP? Softwoods we use around here a white pine and hemlock.
    Slippy and Arklatex like this.

  11. #20
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    Sounds like the situation and pine species is an issue where the OP lives, but I have had good success in remote areas in the north with spruce, fir and lodgepole pine ................. far, far away from stores and lumberyards ............ with a chainsaw. An Alaska mill or a Granberg mill attaches to the chainsaw and you can turn out pretty damn good dimensional lumber and beams with them. Yes the end result is rustic, not like planed and kiln dried wood, but with a sharp saw you would be surprised at how good the end result can be once you gain a bit of experience.
    Slippy and Mad Trapper like this.
    Everyone is entitled to an opinion as long as it is a learned one.

 

 
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