Gunsmith book recommendation - Page 2
Register

Welcome to the Prepper Forum / Survivalist Forum.

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed.

Gunsmith book recommendation

This is a discussion on Gunsmith book recommendation within the Books, Videos, Media, Podcasts forums, part of the General Discussion category; Originally Posted by jimb1972 Without the book it will likely take hours or days, with it will take minutes, especially if you are missing pieces. ...

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 11 to 18 of 18
Like Tree14Likes

Thread: Gunsmith book recommendation

  1. #11
    Senior Member


    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    NORTHEAST USA
    Posts
    8,418
    Quote Originally Posted by jimb1972 View Post
    Without the book it will likely take hours or days, with it will take minutes, especially if you are missing pieces.
    After doing them for over 65 years, I don't think so, I just use the parts schematics for ordering parts.

    If needed to I could just use the schematic for assembly, but then it is no challenge.

    I have never needed a book for doing them.

    I have a routine for putting together those I have not done before.

    In my opinion all you do need is the parts schematic for assembly, they show where every part goes.

    You can get them from Gun Parts Inc, or pull them off their site.

    I have been at this longer than most of you have been alive.

    Example: detail stripped a 1911 in 1955 along with PO-8's, assembled M-14's in 1957.
    Last edited by SOCOM42; 09-14-2020 at 03:15 PM.
    inceptor likes this.

  2. #12
    Senior Member


    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Way North East
    Posts
    7,847
    Good to have hard copies of service manuals for all your firearms. Even just IPLs are better than nothing.

    Same goes for cars/trucks/tractors.......most any mechanical device.

    The "box of parts" that @SOCOM42 mentioned brings back memories............I worked at a motorcycle dealership a few summers while in college. We would get a query of "how much to rebuild a XYZ that has a bad crankshaft?" , then they would come in with a box full of filthy parts (dirtbikes!). Kids would just take things apart without even cleaning off the grime first. Most of the boxes had missing or "extra" parts.
    inceptor likes this.

  3. #13
    Senior Member


    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    1,281
    Brownells has a series of books called gunsmith kinks. It is full of interesting problems that gunsmiths had to solve and how they did it.

    I have 1-3 need to pick up number 4

    https://www.amazon.com/Bob-Brownells.../dp/B004D694OU
    inceptor likes this.
    It is an evil society that blames the tool for the actions of its user.

  4. Remove Advertisements
    PrepperForums.net
    Advertisements
     

  5. #14
    Senior Member


    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    1,689
    This thread has been more interesting and less informative than I would have thought.

  6. #15
    Senior Member


    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    home
    Posts
    2,310
    Quote Originally Posted by SOCOM42 View Post
    After doing them for over 65 years, I don't think so, I just use the parts schematics for ordering parts.

    If needed to I could just use the schematic for assembly, but then it is no challenge.

    I have never needed a book for doing them.

    I have a routine for putting together those I have not done before.

    In my opinion all you do need is the parts schematic for assembly, they show where every part goes.

    You can get them from Gun Parts Inc, or pull them off their site.

    I have been at this longer than most of you have been alive.

    Example: detail stripped a 1911 in 1955 along with PO-8's, assembled M-14's in 1957.
    Good for you. Most people do not have that level of knowledge, the fact that you don't need the book does not help someone else. The OP asked a question, I answered it with an honest answer of what I feel would most help the average person. I really don't care what you can do, or know.
    "A man convinced against his will, is of the same opinion still."- The wise words of Benjamin Franklin.

  7. #16
    Senior Member


    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Way North East
    Posts
    7,847
    If you have service weapons the USGI manuals are available. Not gun smithing per se but details servicing/maintaining the weapon.

  8. #17
    Senior Member


    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    NORTHEAST USA
    Posts
    8,418
    Quote Originally Posted by jimb1972 View Post
    Good for you. Most people do not have that level of knowledge, the fact that you don't need the book does not help someone else. The OP asked a question, I answered it with an honest answer of what I feel would most help the average person. I really don't care what you can do, or know.
    If you look, I suggested the parts diagram for use, I have read some of the "how to books",

    there is not enough paper to print all the variables within one gun.

    My first posting suggested a night class in machine shop, learn the basics of what goes into making them,

    like reading a mike, running a tap or die, how to remove a broken screw.

    I have a friend and my brother who have zero mechanical aptitude, nothing is going to help them with any repairs,

    neither can even field strip a 1911.

    Here is a how to book for you, the M14 Shop Manual, by Jerry Kuhnhausen, this is a detailed book for a specific rifle.

    The book question is far to variable for a true simple answer, good you named some for him,

    I went in a different direction to come up with a solution, learn some basics as the lowest denominator,

    some people don't know a wrench from a hammer.

    There are plenty of people here that have asked me questions mostly in PM's about gun problems, 99% got an answer they could use.

    Final, why should you give a shit as to what I know? you shouldn't,

    I don't care if you do or don't, if you did there would be something wrong with you.

  9. #18
    Senior Member


    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Way North East
    Posts
    7,847
    Quote Originally Posted by SOCOM42 View Post
    If you look, I suggested the parts diagram for use, I have read some of the "how to books",

    there is not enough paper to print all the variables within one gun.

    My first posting suggested a night class in machine shop, learn the basics of what goes into making them,

    like reading a mike, running a tap or die, how to remove a broken screw.

    I have a friend and my brother who have zero mechanical aptitude, nothing is going to help them with any repairs,

    neither can even field strip a 1911.

    Here is a how to book for you, the M14 Shop Manual, by Jerry Kuhnhausen, this is a detailed book for a specific rifle.

    The book question is far to variable for a true simple answer, good you named some for him,

    I went in a different direction to come up with a solution, learn some basics as the lowest denominator,

    some people don't know a wrench from a hammer.

    There are plenty of people here that have asked me questions mostly in PM's about gun problems, 99% got an answer they could use.

    Final, why should you give a shit as to what I know? you shouldn't,

    I don't care if you do or don't, if you did there would be something wrong with you.
    I agree you need basic knowledge of mechanics as a foundation. I got started with lawnmowers and dirtbikes. Then cars/trucks/farm equipment.

    In high school we had metal fabrication and power mechanics courses with a great instructor. Lots of stuff still useful to me today: gas/electric welding, soldering, forging, lathes, bridgeports, measuring tools/tolerances, casting metals, gasoline and electric motors,.........

    Besides the basic knowledge you also need the proper tools for the job at hand. For guns start out with the tools just to clean and maintain each firearm. Then get specific tools needed for each arm. Many tools will be useful in general: measuring tools that you may already have, quality screwdrivers big and small, brass and steel drifts, drills and bits, taps and dies, files, vices, presses,..........

    Here is a useful PDF for M14/M1A, @SOCOM42 might add useful comments?

    Contains a good trick on how to use a 30-06/270 Win case to take down the bolt.....
    Attached Files Attached Files

 

 
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Back to Top