Register

Welcome to the Prepper Forum / Survivalist Forum.

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed.

Can I hook up a large propane tank to a camping stove (or other small applicances)?

This is a discussion on Can I hook up a large propane tank to a camping stove (or other small applicances)? within the General Prepper and Survival Talk forums, part of the Survivalist, Prepper, Bushcrafter, Forest Rangers category; I have a small 2-burner Coleman camping stove, as well as a 10,000 BTU propane heater. I normally buy and use 16oz propane canisters for ...

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16
  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    6

    Can I hook up a large propane tank to a camping stove (or other small applicances)?

    I have a small 2-burner Coleman camping stove, as well as a 10,000 BTU propane heater. I normally buy and use 16oz propane canisters for these appliances, but am wondering if I might get a better value if I purchase and hook up a 20 lb tank instead.

    Is this possible to do? And would I need any special cables or fittings/regulators? If so, .. what extra equipment would I need? Is it even worth it? And is it safe to do? I ask because I've read that it generally isn't very safe to store and use propane tanks indoors (at least not large 20 lb tanks) .. and since I'm planning on bugging in, I don't want to introduce a fire hazard of any kind. I'm in a condo, .. so putting the propane tank outside isn't really an option (if you anticipate possible theft and the need for heat retention, etc). Does anyone here have any advice?

    If I'm stuck with having to use small 16oz canisters, where can I get the best deal on them? The best deal I've found so far is at Walmart (ie: 2-pack of "Worthington" brand 16oz propane canisters for $5.34). Has anyone here found a better deal anywhere else? If so, .. where?

    Thanks!
    - Yvan

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Bucyrus, Oh.
    Posts
    56
    I think it would be safe, you will have to get some fittings and some gas line. I dont think i would run these appliances indoors. Just take the unit to a plumbing, heating and cooling business, they will get you the fittings you'll need..You might need the lp tank with you also.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    311
    Yes you can the size of the tank matters not, its the regulator
    That does the work. As long as the regulator is made for the appliance
    You will be fine

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    243
    Coleman - Coleman- 5-ft (1.52-m) High-Pressure Propane Hose & Adapter - 5-ft (1.52-m) High-Pressure Propane Hose & Adapter

    Copied straight from the coleman site... Hope this helps

    "Use your Coleman® stoves and lanterns almost 20 times longer without refueling with help from the Coleman® 5 Ft. High-Pressure Propane Hose and Adapter. This accessory is all you need to hook a 20-lb. tank to your camp stove or lantern for high-pressure fuel.

    Connects appliance to refillable 20 lb. propane cylinder (not included)
    Hand-tighten counterclockwise"
    Last edited by crystalphoto; 11-25-2012 at 11:48 AM.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    61
    You have to buy an adapter and a regulator, but you can hook a larger tank up. They sell the adapters and regulators on amazon.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    TEXAS
    Posts
    492
    Since you're in a condo, fire that stove up on the patio. Even with the 16oz. bottle, it wasn't designed to be used indoors.
    be safe.

    punch

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    1,952
    As already mentioned there are adapter kits that are available and reasonably priced. They work well. You can assemble one your self but make sure you check it will for leaks regularly. Propane has a tendency to sink since its heavier than air and will accumulate in low lying areas where you may not smell it and create a very dangerous situation.

    Personally I like the duel fuel model camp stoves. They use "White Gas" aka; Coleman Fuel or unleaded Gasoline. Gas is much cheaper but the white gas stores better longer term. The price of white gas can vary considerably on where you buy it even in the same store chain. Some walmarts will have it for about 8 bucks a gallon and others will have it for 12 plus a gallon. Go figure. I went this route becuase I often have 5 gallons of gas in a can around here in addition to the fact that my truck has a 35 gallon tank! Thats in addition to any white gas I may have around which means I aint running out of a fuel source anytime soon. I personally use the Coleman model 533 Single Burner stove. Its very small light weight and burns several hours on a pint of fuel. Yes I even used this inside to cook with 3 winters ago when we had a ice storm and got iced in several days and I wanted to conserve my propane which is what I heat with and I had only 1 x 40 lbs tank and 2 x 20 lbs tanks. Just crack a window slightly if you you use it in confined spaces for more than about 5 minutes and your good to go. That set up has now been regulated as my back up now as I found that with a folding Sterno Stove which burns much cleaner works as well and better in many cases. Its also cheaper I think as if you buy the Sterno in the 72 pack on line from wally world and pick it up in store there is no shipping and it works out to less than a buck a 2 hour can of it. It also stores much better than gas which has ethenol in it and wrecks havok on plastic seals and o rings common on gas appliances. For light in a power outage I also use oil lamps. It also can knock the chill off a room too. You wont be toasty warm though but you wont be a popcicle either. I have a small grill that will fit over mine if I take the glass globe off and it will heat water for Ramen Noodle, cup of hot tea or even warm up some caned goods to make them more palletable. For straight up heating Propane or Kerosene is probably the most economical. Just crack a window while in use and you will be fine. I used Kerosene heaters in Japan for 12 years without an issue that way as did 99% of my neighbors. Kerosene stores very well long term and while flamible its not voltile to the extent other options are making it very safe.

    Just a few ways in which I have addressed the power outage thing as well as the ability to heat or cook.

  8. #8
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by crystalphoto View Post
    Coleman - Coleman- 5-ft (1.52-m) High-Pressure Propane Hose & Adapter - 5-ft (1.52-m) High-Pressure Propane Hose & Adapter

    Copied straight from the coleman site... Hope this helps

    "Use your Coleman® stoves and lanterns almost 20 times longer without refueling with help from the Coleman® 5 Ft. High-Pressure Propane Hose and Adapter. This accessory is all you need to hook a 20-lb. tank to your camp stove or lantern for high-pressure fuel.

    Connects appliance to refillable 20 lb. propane cylinder (not included)
    Hand-tighten counterclockwise"
    Thanks for the link! I'm a little confused, however, since someone else here is saying that you also need a regulator. My camping stove has 2 knobs on it to control the flow of propane (one for each burner). Could those be considered the regulator(s) in this situation? Or do I still need some other piece of hardware?

    - Yvan

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    1,952
    The regulator mentioned is for reducing the pressure in the tank down to a workable pressure for the stove. Propane is under pressure like a fire extinguisher. This is why the re-fillable tanks are only good for 12 years after manufacture and will have to be static tested after that to continue to have them legally filled. Without that regulator installed you will blow every seal on your stove and possibly cause damage to other components.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    1,952
    Shop propane regulator at Lowes.com: Search Results

    The silver saucer shaped component on this adapter for a BBQ grill is a regulator.

 

 
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Ads

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. How long does stored propane last?
    By ZillaMonster in forum Alternative Energy (Wind, Solar, Hydro etc)
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 08-31-2014, 12:49 PM
  2. Please hook a brother up....
    By LunaticFringeInc in forum Site Recommendations, Questions, and Support
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 12-04-2012, 02:52 PM
  3. Propane question
    By justleesa in forum General Prepper and Survival Talk
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 11-25-2012, 07:58 PM
  4. Refilling 1# propane canisters
    By AquaHull in forum General Prepper and Survival Talk
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11-08-2012, 05:34 AM
  5. 2011 Season Large Mouth Bass
    By RalphS in forum Fishing
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 12-30-2011, 07:44 AM

Search tags for this page

camping stove propane tank adapter

,
can you use 30# propane tank instead of 20#
,

can you use a large propane tank on small coleman camp stoves

,

coleman propane tank adapter

,

connect coleman stove to large propane tanks

,
hooking camp stove to propane tank
,
how to make hook 5 gallon propane to small grill
,
propane adapter for camp stove
Click on a term to search for related topics.
Back to Top