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Where to begin as a new prepper

This is a discussion on Where to begin as a new prepper within the General Prepper and Survival Talk forums, part of the Survivalist, Prepper, Bushcrafter, Forest Rangers category; First of all, make sure your tetanus shots are up to date. As you start your preps, think about redundancy. In other words, have back ...

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Thread: Where to begin as a new prepper

  1. #21
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    First of all, make sure your tetanus shots are up to date.

    As you start your preps, think about redundancy. In other words, have back ups for the back ups. You won't have this at first, but keep it in mind. How many ways can you cook? (Propane, wood, Dutch ovens, sun oven, parabolic cooker, manure fuel, methane generator) How many ways to have safe water? (Various filters, boiling, biosand/UV, chemical) Do you have back up lanterns or light sources? (Solar, dynamo, battery, oil, kerosine, candles, generator) Power sources? (Multi fuel generator, solar) Food sources? (Stored, garden, fish, small livestock, insects, native food harvesting). Tools? (Extra blades, handles, full size tools, fold up tools). Fire making. But don't get overwhelmed by this. You start with the basics and once those are covered, you start asking, "If this wouldn't work, what could I do?" Then start building redundancy.

    Also think about barter items (Soap, hand lotion, matches, candles, small flashlights, TP, etc.)
    MaterielGeneral likes this.

  2. #22
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    .22 would be a top barter item. It will feed your family. Tooth paste and tooth brushes. But more importantly - your skills. Wood working, planting, home repairs - the list is extensive. Barter your skills.
    Hidden Content Wouldn't it be nice.....

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smitty901 View Post
    Start with the question. What if a storm hit and power was off here for a week, emergence services where very limited? What would our house hold need to get by with no help? When you have a list fill it. Once that is done test it see if you covered it well then look at two weeks. It is a bigger job than you think at first.
    Food
    Water
    Heat (location time of year)
    Sanitary
    Security
    Source of information ,news ect
    Power and or batteries
    No sense prepping of SHTF if you can't survive a couple weeks.
    That's the way I go!

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  5. #24
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    Very true. I plan on doing drills with my family this summer when I have more time off work to plan a good drill.

  6. #25
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    I would add that you must develop a prepper mentality that causes you to be curious, try new things, read and study up when you hear about a new technology you are interested in, and actually START trying stuff. Learn how to cook with a Dutch oven. Practice starting fires. Plant a small garden. Build a biosand filter. Get a few chicks and raise them. Get your CCW and practice. DO IT! I get so tired of "preppers" who just want to be spoon fed without doing much on their part to learn anything on their own. These "preppers" are actually sheeple who like the idea of prepping, but want someone else to guide them in every aspect. They lack initiative, and these folks are not going to survive very long because they haven't developed their own problem solving skills or creative thinking that takes them outside the box.

    I talked to a guy last week who said he has been wanting to start some chickens for a long time. He asked the most stupid questions - really. Like, hey - if you were really interested in chickens you would have already read a book on raising chickens and would already know that you don't need a rooster to get eggs. He likes to talk, but will never actually get chickens. Or someone who wants to pick your brain on defense but will never get their CCW or take a defensive handgun class. Or someone who talks about how they want to store up food but has never even heard about the major companies that provide longterm food options. Sheesh, if you just googled "long term food storage" you'd find a ton of stuff. So ask lots of questions and then look for the answers, and then TRY it! You have to be a self starter and a self learner to some degree. Being dependent on everyone else for information is just as dangerous as being dependent on the government to take care of you. Just my two cents worth. We do need each other, and we have so much to learn from each other, but I have found that there are both givers and takers in the prepper community, with many people simply wanting to suck information out of everyone else without puttting forth much effort on their own.

  7. #26
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    If you start with prepping up with food storage. There are many brands of food storage out there. One of those that I think it is quite good is mountain house.
    You can see some of my reviews of freeze dried foods

  8. #27
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    USE ONLY WATER THAT HAS BEEN PROPERLY DISINFECTED FOR DRINKING, COOKING, MAKING ANY PREPARED DRINK, OR FOR BRUSHING TEETH
    1. Use bottled water that has not been exposed to flood waters if it is available.
    2. If you don’t have bottled water, you should boil water to make it safe. Boiling water will kill most types of disease-causing organisms that may be present. If the water is cloudy, filter it through clean cloths or allow it to settle, and draw off the clear water for boiling. Boil the water for one minute, let it cool, and store it in clean containers with covers.
    3. If you can’t boil water, you can disinfect it using household bleach. Bleach will kill some, but not all, types of disease-causing organisms that may be in the water. If the water is cloudy, filter it through clean cloths or allow it to settle, and draw off the clear water for disinfection. Add 1/8 teaspoon (or 8 drops) of regular, unscented, liquid household bleach for each gallon of water, stir it well and let it stand for 30 minutes before you use it. Store disinfected water in clean containers with covers.
    4. If you have a well that has been flooded, the water should be tested and disinfected after flood waters recede. If you suspect that your well may be contaminated, contact your local or state health department or agriculture extension agent for specific advice.

    Choose a disinfection method.
    Boiling and chemical treatment are two general methods used to effectively disinfect small quantities of filtered and settled water.
    Boiling is the surest method to make water safe to drink and kill disease-causing microorganisms like Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium, which are frequently found in rivers and lakes. These disease-causing organisms are less likely to occur in well water (as long as it has not been affected by flood waters). If not treated properly and neutralized, Giardia may cause diarrhea, fatigue, and cramps after ingestion. Cryptosporidium is highly resistant to disinfection. It may cause diarrhea, nausea and/or stomach cramps. People with severely weakened immune systems are likely to have more severe and more persistent symptoms than healthy individuals. Boil filtered and settled water vigorously for one minute (at altitudes above one mile, boil for three minutes). To improve the flat taste of boiled water, aerate it by pouring it back and forth from one container to another and allow it to stand for a few hours, or add a pinch of salt for each quart or liter of water boiled.

    When boiling is not practical, certain chemicals will kill most harmful or disease-causing organisms. For chemical disinfection to
    be effective, the water must be filtered and settled first. Chlorine and iodine are the two chemicals commonly used to treat water. They are somewhat effective in protecting against exposure to Giardia, but may not be effective in controlling more resistant organisms like Cryptosporidium. Chlorine is generally more effective than iodine in controlling Giardia, and both disinfectants work much better in warm water.

    You can use a non-scented, household chlorine bleach that contains a chlorine compound to disinfect water. Do not use non-chlorine bleach to disinfect water. Typically, household chlorine bleaches will be 5.25% available chlorine. Follow the procedure written on the label.

    If the strength of the bleach is unknown, add ten drops per quart or liter of filtered and settled water. Double the amount of chlorine for cloudy, murky or colored water or water that is extremely cold.

    Mix the treated water thoroughly and allow it to stand, preferably covered, for 30 minutes. The water should have a slight chlorine odor. If not, repeat the dosage and allow the water to stand for an additional 15 minutes. If the treated water has too strong a chlorine taste, allow the water to stand exposed to the air for a few hours or pour it from one clean container to another several times.

    You can use granular calcium hypochlorite to disinfect water. Add and dissolve one heaping teaspoon of high-test granular calcium hypochlorite (approximately ¼ ounce) for each two gallons of water, or 5 milliliters (approximately 7 grams) per 7.5 liters of water. The mixture will produce a stock chlorine solution of approximately 500 milligrams per liter, since the calcium hypochlorite has available chlorine equal to 70 percent of its weight. To disinfect water, add the chlorine solution in the ratio of one part of chlorine solution to each 100 parts of water to be treated. This is roughly equal to adding 1 pint (16 ounces) of stock chlorine to each 12.5 gallons of water or (approximately ½ liter to 50 liters of water) to be disinfected. To remove any objectionable chlorine odor, aerate the disinfected water by pouring it back and forth from one clean container to another.

    You can use chlorine tablets to disinfect filtered and settled water. Chlorine tablets containing the necessary dosage for drinking water disinfection can be purchased in a commercially prepared form. These tablets are available from drug and sporting goods stores and should be used as stated in the instructions. When instructions are not available, use one tablet for each quart or liter of water to be purified.

    You can use tincture of iodine to disinfect filtered and settled water. Common household iodine from the medicine chest or first aid kit may be used to disinfect water. Add five drops of 2 percent U.S. or your country’s approved Pharmacopeia tincture of iodine to each quart or liter of clear water. For cloudy water add ten drops and let the solution stand for at least 30 minutes.

    You can use iodine tablets to disinfect filtered and settled water. Purchase commercially prepared iodine tablets containing the necessary dosage for drinking water disinfection at drug and sporting goods stores. Use as stated in instructions. When instructions are not available, use one tablet for each quart or liter of filtered and settled water to be purified.

    Summary of Key Points:

    Filter murky or colored water through clean cloths or allow it to settle. It is better to both settle and filter.

    Boiling is the surest method to make water safe to drink and kill disease-causing microorganisms like Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium, which are frequently found in rivers and lakes.

    To improve the flat taste of boiled water, aerate it by pouring it back and forth from one container to another and allow it to stand for a few hours, or add a pinch of salt for each quart or liter of water boiled.

    When boiling is not practical, certain chemicals will kill most harmful or disease-causing organisms. Chlorine (in the form of unscented bleach) and iodine are the two chemicals commonly used to treat water.

    You can use a non-scented, household chlorine bleach that contains a chlorine compound to disinfect water. (Remember, 1/8 teaspoon and 8 drops are about the same quantity.)

    You can use tincture of iodine to disinfect filtered and settled water. Common household iodine from the medicine chest or first aid kit may be used to disinfect water.

    Tincture of iodine. For cloudy water add ten drops and let the solution stand for at least 30 minutes.

    Ground Water and Drinking Water Homepage | Drinking Water | US EPA
    A prudent man foresees evil and hides himself, But the simple pass on and are punished. Proverbs 22:3 NKJV

  9. #28
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    Learn how to barter.
    Go to your local classifieds, weather it be Craigslist or whatever. Find the For Trade or Barter section and start getting some experience with bartering.
    It could turn out that bartering is the new currency, like in Zimbabwe right now a can of beer is $40! So the locals are just bartering right now. I think its a skill worth polishing now, while its fun and easy. Not later with its scary and life threatening.

  10. #29
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    I design my plan starting with actual needs.

    Humans need 4 things to survive, and only 4 things.

    Air, water, food, shelter. In that order.

    EVERY THING else is a want, with one exception, security.

    If you get killed, nothing else matters.

    That being said, depending on where you live, you can get a great start by filling those needs in order.

    Air= ways to keep breathing. If you live somewhere urban, or in forested areas, gas masks can be life savers. They will allow you to breathe and see (sort of) in tear gas or smoke.

    Water= humans can die in hours (usually no more than 5 days) without water. Store water, and/or filters to ensure you can stay hydrated.

    Food= humans can live for weeks-months without food, but the longer you go, the weaker you get. Store food where you intend to end up, and for the trip to get there. Things with high nutritional value. Things high in carbs, protein, and fat. Consider food with vitamin C as well, or a suppliment. Also consider how you will prepare your food. Consider food that can be prepared for morale reasons and taste, but that can also be eaten as is, if needed

    Shelter= whatever it takes to get out of the elements. A tarp can suffice, so can a tent, or makeshift shelter.

    Security= whatever it takes to stay safe. It can be overwhelming firepower, or the ability to disappear and stay hidden, and everything in between.

    Everything else is quality of life. So consider your plan in an emergency. Just remember, if you plan to do any traveling on foot "ounces equal pounds, and pounds equal pain"

  11. #30
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    were to start. 1.) finds some like minded friends. 2) refer to 1 3. refer to 2,that refers to 1
    1.)2.)3.) A= asses skills
    4.)begin planning
    5.) acquire essential equipment and supplies
    6.) give each party member a meaningful task and security while important is every ones job.
    nothing to see here, move along.

 

 
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