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Should You Learn Multiple Food Preservation Techniques

This is a discussion on Should You Learn Multiple Food Preservation Techniques within the Featured Topics forums, part of the Survivalist, Prepper, Bushcrafter, Forest Rangers category; We use an oriental method of pickling vegetables called making Kimchee. Requires water salt and hot spicy red peppers as basic ingridients. A simple method ...

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Thread: Should You Learn Multiple Food Preservation Techniques

  1. #21
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    We use an oriental method of pickling vegetables called making Kimchee. Requires water salt and hot spicy red peppers as basic ingridients.

    A simple method that works with one or a lot of heads of cabbage Simple Kimchi: A Basic Recipe for Getting Started

    in cold weather it will stay good for several weeks.

    There are also instructions for turnip kimchi Radish Kimchi Recipe with Ginger and Red Pepper I know it says radish, but the korean ones are about 2 - 3 pounds in weight Korean radish (Mu) - Korean cooking ingredients - Maangchi.com
    Annie likes this.
    It's all true, give or take a lie or two.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Redneck View Post
    Sonya, I have an All American Sun Oven with dehydration kit. I personally have yet to use it, but seems like it should work just fine. I'm in the deep south too & in years past, they used to dehydrate apple slices on their metal roofs. The little kids would have the chore of placing the slices & turning them every so often.

    We have an older version fo the same oven from back when they were produced by a company called Solutions From Science. My wife likes it, I am not such a fan.

    Should You Learn Multiple Food Preservation Techniques-20160917_144510.jpg

    I bought it several years ago when we were still living in Minnesota. We tried it a few times and it sort of worked. Mrs Inor made baked beans in it and they were cooked, but they were still pretty hard. She made bread in it once and that was a complete disaster. The bread did cook, but it came out the same color as the raw dough. She tried it again, basting the bread with butter and that came out just looking like raw bread dough with burnt butter on it. So, all in all, I have been pretty disappointed with it.

    When we moved to Arizona last August, I figured I would try it again thinking maybe Minnesota is just not the right environment to expect a solar oven to work. This time, I just tried to boil water with it. I dutifully went out about every 30 minutes and adjusted it to be pointed directly at the sun. After about 4 hours, the water still had not boiled. My conclusion is that if the damn thing cannot even boil water in the heat of August, in the middle of the south Arizona desert at about 4000 feet, what good is it?

    That being said, my wife does like it and maybe I am just using it wrong, but...
    Sonya likes this.
    rest in peace Corporal Bradley Coy 06/08/92-10/24/14

  3. #23
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    Be it dehydrating canning or pressure cooking, I think almost anything we preserve ourselves is cheaper than buying off the shelf. Except the things we can from the garden. For us here that may not be cheaper, but I feel learning to grow food from scratch is worth it the extra time, money and sweat in the long run.

    I'm really wanting to look into bottling my own bbq sauce and other sauces. Those plastic bottles from the supermarket don't last that long in the pantry. Stuff ends up tasting like plastic if you leave it too long.
    "I shall die with weapons in my hands."
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  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Inor View Post
    We tried it a few times and it sort of worked. Mrs Inor made baked beans in it and they were cooked, but they were still pretty hard. She made bread in it once and that was a complete disaster. The bread did cook, but it came out the same color as the raw dough. She tried it again, basting the bread with butter and that came out just looking like raw bread dough with burnt butter on it. So, all in all, I have been pretty disappointed with it.
    Not a good idea to cook raw beans in a sun oven unless it got well above boiling. Sun ovens or slow cookers that don't reach a boiling point don't destroy the toxin in beans, and some varieties like red kidney beans will make you violently sick even if the beans are soft and appear cooked through.

    I agree they are not easy to use. they would be fine for heating up foods, but actual baking and such is another matter. I did do baked potatoes once, and hard boiled eggs, but the timing was always tricky. Either the food isn't done or it is dried out.
    Last edited by Sonya; 12-10-2016 at 04:00 PM.
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  6. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sonya View Post
    Not a good idea to cook raw beans in a sun oven unless it got well above boiling. Sun ovens or slow cookers that don't reach a boiling point don't destroy the toxin in beans, and some varieties like red kidney beans will make you violently sick even if the beans are soft and appear cooked through.

    I agree they are not easy to use. they would be fine for heating up foods, but actual baking and such is another matter. I did do baked potatoes once, and hard boiled eggs, but the timing was always tricky. Either the food isn't done or it is dried out.
    I honestly do not know if the beans were raw when she cooked them or if they were partially cooked already. All I know is they were not very good after sitting in the solar oven almost all day.

    The absolute best prepper food tool I own was not even purchased as a "prepper" tool. I bought it simply as a luxury item and quickly realized that it would be worth its considerable weight in gold if SHTF.

    It is a ceramic BBQ grill. I bought the Big Green Egg brand but there are others that I think will work equally well at a MUCH cheaper price. Just a couple of points about it that I think make it a great addition to your preps if you plan to stay in one place:

    1 - As a grill it works better than anything I have ever used (and I have used a bunch of different styles).

    2 - I bought the "plate setter" for it so I could do indirect, low and slow smoking sessions. But then I realized with indirect heat, you can also bake with it! If you have not had pizza made on a ceramic grill, you have not had pizza.

    3 - It allows for extremely tight control of the temperature. With the standard vent system that comes with it, I can control the temp of a charcoal fire within about 10 degrees of what I want it to be. This fall, I built a Heater Meter for it HeaterMeter BBQ Controller Official Store and that lets me control the temp within 1-2 degrees of my target temp. The Heater Meter fan, however, does not have enough airflow to get the temps much higher than 425 or 450. So when I grill steaks and I want the temps at around 650-700 I just slide the Heater Meter fan out of the way.

    4 - It is EXTREMELY efficient with using charcoal. Filling it with charcoal, I can do about 20 hours of burn at 250 degrees. When cooking chops and steaks at 700 degrees, I can usually get about 4 meals per filling of charcoal. With my old Texas style grill/smoker I was going through about 250 pounds of Kingsford per year. Now I can only use lump charcoal, but I burn less than 100 pounds per year and we grill A LOT.

    As I mentioned, I bought the Big Green Egg brand and I am very happy with it. It does everything it is advertised to do and it does work as well as it is advertised to work. BUT, it was crazy expensive. It is bad enough the "large" size was about $800 for the grill. But that does not come with anything but the grill. If you want to have legs for it, that is an additional charge. If you want the plate setter for indirect cooking, additional charge. It is the only cooking thing we have ever bought that did not come with a cookbook - yep, you guessed it, another $50 gets you the cookbook. All told, I have about $1500 in the thing.

    After I bought it, I discovered there are some other brands that are in the same league without such a price tag. But as I said, I originally bought it just as a luxury item anyway; the prepping value was a very nice added bonus.
    Last edited by Inor; 12-10-2016 at 09:04 PM.
    Sonya likes this.
    rest in peace Corporal Bradley Coy 06/08/92-10/24/14

  7. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Inor View Post
    The absolute best prepper food tool I own was not even purchased as a "prepper" tool. I bought it simply as a luxury item and quickly realized that it would be worth its considerable weight in gold if SHTF.

    It is a ceramic BBQ grill. I bought the Big Green Egg brand but there are others that I think will work equally well at a MUCH cheaper price.
    Wow, just looked that up and I am amazed! Didn't know a charcoal grill could bake bread!

    Guess the generic term is a Kamado Grill, and yes the Big Green Egg ones are pricey, their basic model starts at $900 on amazon.

    But it looks like Akorn makes similar models starting as low as $150 and they claim to hold the temp for 12 hours which is impressive. I have never been into grilling but it does seem like a very good prep if it can bake and do other things, especially since charcoal is cheap and stores so easily.
    Inor likes this.

  8. #27
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    We use many different methods my wife cans fruits, vegetables, and meat we have home built solar dehydrator that works great we also have a smokehouse. We vacuum pack dehydrated fruits and vegetables and jerky made in the smokehouse. Dry storage in mylar bags and buckets there are also premade meals vacuum sealed or in mason jars. We also have a couple propane freezers that are full even if we lose power the freezers keep working.
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  9. #28
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    here is the short answer -----------------------YES.
    nothing to see here, move along.

  10. #29
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    Late to the party, but a topic I love.

    I grew up with a huge garden, fruit trees and chickens. We preserved everything. I learned to can, make preserves and pickles, dehydrate, etc from my mom and gran. There were 10 of us, so we went through a lot of food. I mucked a lot of stalls and turned a lot of earth too. It taught me to appreciate the real value of food and respect for farmers and ranchers.

    These days, I small batch can - water and pressure, dehydrate fruit mostly, jerk meat, make scrapple. I'm experimenting with sauerkraut with mixed results. I learned camp cooking as a kid, but for some reason we never used dutch ovens. I've got my gran's cleaned up and seasoned and that's my Spring camping project.

    BTW - If you're in the market for a pressure canner, I highly recommend All-American Pressure Cooker/Canners. I have the 25-quart. I can a lot in pints and it will do 14 in a two layer batch. It's heavy aluminum, made in America... and NO gasket to wear out. It has a gauge and weights. Bonus, it can be used as an autoclave. I bet you guessed that I love mine.
    Working on my manifesto.

  11. #30
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    For sure, you oughtta know multiple techniques. I know how to make jerky and can foods, and I'm working on learning how to make pemmican as well. Can't hurt to have a backup plan right?

 

 
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