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Should You Learn Multiple Food Preservation Techniques

This is a discussion on Should You Learn Multiple Food Preservation Techniques within the Featured Topics forums, part of the Survivalist, Prepper, Bushcrafter, Forest Rangers category; Originally Posted by PrepperForums Should you learn (and use) more than one food preservation technique? Why? Why not? Yes, you should learn as many as ...

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Thread: Should You Learn Multiple Food Preservation Techniques

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by PrepperForums View Post

    Should you learn (and use) more than one food preservation technique? Why? Why not?
    Yes, you should learn as many as feasible because knowledge is power. Know how/experience is the most valuable prepper item I possess... and I possess a lot of stuff.

    Quote Originally Posted by PrepperForums View Post
    Which techniques do you feel are most effective?
    Whatever works for you in your environment, especially if there is no power and maybe society has failed. A lot is mentioned of root cellars, but in the deep south they aren't practical. Southerners have always pickled & smoked lots of food for preservation... not just because we love it but because those techniques worked in the old days in our climate. That is one reason I grow apple trees. Back in the old days, apples were grown all over the country & down here they were grown to a large extent to make vinegar... which is a great food preservative. So I have over 150 trees along with hand operated grinder & cider press. To me, apple trees provide a continuing supply of food, alcoholic beverage & vinegar. All valuable for survival.
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  2. #12
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    Good Post!

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sonya View Post
    The only one I have learned so far is dehydrating. I love it, especially for vegetables. IMO canned vegetables are pretty darn awful, plus all of the C is cooked out of them whereas dehydrated is nearly the same as fresh. If I had to live off preps for months I could deal with canned meat, but having to eat canned vegetables too would be disgusting and far to "processed" for a daily diet.

    Want to learn canning next, and did buy a small pressure cooker/canner for meats, but I can't imagine using it to can green beans and the like when dehydrating is so much better.

    In my locale I don't think dehydrating would be feasible without power, other than short term jerky or whatever. The historic methods were salting, root cellars and then canning in more recent years.
    Don't get me wrong, . . . not judging you, Sonya, . . . but if you are talking about leather britches (strung up, dried green beans) vs. quart jars of properly canned white half runner beans, . . . well, . . . you'd starve in my family.

    I cook white half runners or Ky wonder pole beans straight out of the garden, . . . or out of the quart jar, . . . and there is just almost no difference in the taste whatsoever. And the nutrition is still there, . . . believe me, . . . I grew up on the things.

    Our "processing" is cleaning, . . . heating, . . . putting in the jars, . . . and cooking for I think 20 minutes in the pressure canner.

    Uhhh, . . . is there something more you were thinking about?

    AND, . . . we are talking about prepping here, . . . dehydrating with electric, . . . inside, . . . in an air conditioned kitchen, . . . it's OK, can be fun. Really tough to duplicate should the Stuff Hit The Fan. Trying to dry anything in the summer around central Ohio, . . . is a real task with bugs, flies, etc. all looking to chow down on anything untended, . . . or worse, . . . lay their eggs in your dehydrating food. NOT FOR ME. I dry apples out in the sun, . . . but that is the only thing I do.

    OTOH, . . . I can build a fire in my backyard, . . . get out the old pressure canner, . . . can right out there just about as easy as on the stove in the kitchen, . . . and I will know for sure the food is safe to eat. Matter of fact, . . . my aunt used to can green beans in a water bath canner, . . . in the front yard, . . . it was a cast iron kettle, . . . held around 15 qts of beans, . . . put a galvanized sheet metal lid on it, . . . built a wood fire under and around it, . . . canned beans. Her 9 kids, me, my brothers, and all the other folks survived that ate em.

    May God bless,
    Dwight
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  5. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sonya View Post
    In my locale I don't think dehydrating would be feasible without power, other than short term jerky or whatever. The historic methods were salting, root cellars and then canning in more recent years.
    Sonya, I have an All American Sun Oven with dehydration kit. I personally have yet to use it, but seems like it should work just fine. I'm in the deep south too & in years past, they used to dehydrate apple slices on their metal roofs. The little kids would have the chore of placing the slices & turning them every so often.

    Last edited by Redneck; 12-09-2016 at 08:52 AM.
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  6. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Redneck View Post
    Sonya, I have an All American Sun Oven with dehydration kit. I personally have yet to use it, but seems like it should work just fine. I'm in the deep south too & in years past, they used to dehydrate apple slices on their metal roofs. The little kids would have the chore of placing the slices & turning them every so often.

    Looking forward your review of this product!
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  7. #16
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    First I had to learn how to grow it. We have started canning. Next up is dehydration. One step at a time.

  8. #17
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    Mrs Inor and I have been playing with food preservation for quite a while, even before we were into the whole self-sufficiency lifestyle. We decided to divide the tasks (and learning) between us. She does all of the canning (water bath and pressure) as well as most of the dehydrating. I do the smoking (hot and cold) and making jerky. We both work on the storage of dry goods. Incidentally, the master jerky maker (and the guy that taught me how to do it properly) is long-standing member here and a good friend in real life: Deebo.

    Dee used to sell his jerky on-line, but I do not know if he is still doing that or not? If he is, BUY SOME! It is incredible! Otherwise, when he does a post on how to make it properly, print the post off and give it a shot. Just following his instructions step by step, I was able to get extremely good jerky the first time. I have done it many times now and I am still not as good as the original, but it is safe and damn tasty.
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  9. #18
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    Blah Blah Blah
    If you think you want to put up some meat...

    1. kill something (let us hope you get 15lbs of meat)

    2. Go to Costco and buy "pork shoulders" which is mostly FAT

    3. Mix your 15lbs of game with the other and you can make some really serious processed meat.

    4. Buy a summer sausage recipe that does 25lbs of meat (hint Cabela's has a good one)

    5. Mix it up, put it in casings and cook it in your oven, it is way better than anything you have ever tried.

    IMO a good summer sausage recipe doing 25lbs of meat for $20 is a good deal
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  10. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by dwight55 View Post
    Don't get me wrong, . . . not judging you, Sonya, . . . but if you are talking about leather britches (strung up, dried green beans) vs. quart jars of properly canned white half runner beans, . . . well, . . . you'd starve in my family.

    I cook white half runners or Ky wonder pole beans straight out of the garden, . . . or out of the quart jar, . . . and there is just almost no difference in the taste whatsoever. And the nutrition is still there, . . . believe me, . . . I grew up on the things.
    True confession: I have never eaten home canned green beans.

    I am from California and we never ate canned anything, it was seen as heresy when the markets were full of gorgeous fresh produce year round. When I moved South I realized Southerners liked their vegetables canned or generally just grey from being overcooked, so I assumed the green beans were the same way. Was also shocked at the often sad looking produce and limited selection at the grocery stores, though that has improved in the last 20 years.

    Will consider canning some and see how they turn out.

    Quote Originally Posted by Redneck View Post
    Sonya, I have an All American Sun Oven with dehydration kit. I personally have yet to use it, but seems like it should work just fine. I'm in the deep south too & in years past, they used to dehydrate apple slices on their metal roofs. The little kids would have the chore of placing the slices & turning them every so often.
    I worked on building a solar oven this summer. Sometimes it worked great, sometimes not. Though at the very least it would be good for prewarming items to save on cooking fuel (like rice or beans soaking in water). That and a haybox would likely save a lot of fuel for longer cooking foods.

    Never tried dehydrating in it though I think the car may also be a good dehydrator even with high humidity. Just guessing since if I leave a couple of cigarettes in the car they are crispy dry within a couple of hours, so that may work for vegetables too and on a larger scale.
    Last edited by Sonya; 12-10-2016 at 06:25 AM.
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  11. #20
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    Knowledge is power. The more options you have, the better your chance of storing and preserving food for when it is needed. I have been considering making a smoke house. Canning is something I was brought up with. dehydration is a good technique also.
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